Ryan gardner

Fermenting

17 posts in this topic

If you can put the towel to your mouth and blow air through it,  it will not impact the CO2 gassing off. It will get the LBK warmer which maybe your intention.

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not necessary.  The LBK is designed to filter out the infrared light that might affect the beer.  Unless you were fermenting outside in direct sunlight, I wouldn't worry.  Most of us use LED or florescent light bulbs in our fermenting rooms for lighting, and they have no affect on the beer that is fermenting.

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But if I understand this right. It's fine to leave it on a counter near a window. So the natural light will not hurt it. But watch the temp as it's sitting on the counter 

MiniYoda likes this

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Not sure about your setup, but some natural light should not be a big factor (I could be wrong, those who know are welcomed to reply).  If possible, just to be on the safe side, block some of the light.  It sounds like the light might be causing the temp to be high.  Usually, especially the first week of fermentation, the temp of the beer is warmer than the temp outside the keg.  If there is any way possible, it might be recommended to put something cool near the keg, like ice bottles, cold wet towels, or my estranged wife (strike that last one).  Try to keep things cooler than 70.  Your beer isn't ruined, but it won't have the taste that would melt your toenails.

 

 

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Just a couple of things. General information - Brown plastic and glass do a very good job of blocking U.V. light which can quickly "skunk" a beer. But, it is best to avoid keeping the LBK in direct sunlight. Secondly - The cabinet temperature may have been 73 deg F, but that is ambient air temperature, and not the temperature of the fermenting wort. Temperatures in the 70's tend to favor "cider-like" flavors and other off tastes such as "butterscotch' and "band-aid plastic" (from chlorine). Mid 60's seem ideal for most M.B. ales made with M.B. yeast. Brewing is a learning process, and I'm not sure that we ever stop learning and improving. 

RickBeer and Shrike like this

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You definitely want to keep the lbk out of the sun. If you can't, try putting a black plastic garbage bag over it loosely.

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4 years ago or so when i first came here i was worried about light too. someone posted this:

 

"Beer is not a vampire."

 

light is not the enemy of beer. UV light is. normal house light unless it is some compact florescent bulbs,  does not generate uv radiation.   SUNlight is a source of UV.

 

hop oil reacts with uv to produce the skunky quality i think from sulfur compounds caused by exposing the oil to uv.

 

the ONLY reason i ferment in a chiller box is for better temperature control. . . not for shielding it from light.

hotrod3539 and Shrike like this

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I am one week into fermenting my first batch, so it's too late now. But....for future batches, does anyone know of a low cost way to keep the LBK cool enough during fermentation? I am in the south and spring time house temperature will be averaging 72 - 74 during the day. I was thinking of using a large ice chest with ice packs. Could that work? Will it be hard to keep a consistent temperature? Does everyone have a fermentation refrigerator? Thanks

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I'm in the south also.  Before I got a dedicated fermentation mini-fridge I used the cooler+frozen bottles method:
 

 

Marius likes this

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