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Timelordjason

Conditionig tips?

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I just bottled my first batch a week ago.
I was wondering....
Is feeling the bottles if they are firm or not the only way to tell if they are done conditioning?
What are the signs that it is ok to chill and drink?
Any other conditioning advice, secrets, tricks?

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50 minutes ago, Timelordjason said:

I just bottled my first batch a week ago.
I was wondering....
Is feeling the bottles if they are firm or not the only way to tell if they are done conditioning?
What are the signs that it is ok to chill and drink?
Any other conditioning advice, secrets, tricks?

Feeling the bottles will help tell you if they are carbonated. Carbing and conditioning are very different.

 

my tip is to be patient. If 3 weeks is your goal, then go six. Youll drink all of them and theyll be mediocre and the last one will be excellent and youll kick yourself fot not having patience.

 

the lighter the beer, typically the longer the conditioning. 

 

Condition / carb in a spot around 70 degrees to help speed up the process.

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On 1/27/2018 at 6:25 PM, Timelordjason said:

I just bottled my first batch a week ago.
I was wondering....
Is feeling the bottles if they are firm or not the only way to tell if they are done conditioning?
What are the signs that it is ok to chill and drink?
Any other conditioning advice, secrets, tricks?

 

In my experience, the wheat beers I've made (see below) have all been fine at 3 weeks conditioned/3 days chill.  All others I let condition for 4+ weeks.  For some recipes like That Voodoo That You Do and others that recommend an even longer time, try to adhere to those if you can, but at the minimum, 4 weeks seems to be the key.

 

Kevin

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1 hour ago, Timelordjason said:

It's my first batch so it's the basic American light 

 

Classic American light.... Condition that 6 weeks..... trust me....... 

 

BUT for a little learning process... at 4 weeks, put one bottle in the fridge for 3 full days, open and consume on 4th day. Take notes.... then wait 2 more weeks (total of 6) repeat and compare notes you will see.....

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Great advice. I will do that I been taking notes of every single detail no matter how insignificant it may see, lol. 

I had a little more beer than bottles not much so i put the rest in a regular coke bottle but it filled up only half way so i put only one carbonation drop in just to see how different it is than the others. 

 

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On 1/27/2018 at 7:18 PM, Creeps McLane said:

Feeling the bottles will help tell you if they are carbonated. Carbing and conditioning are very different.

 

my tip is to be patient. If 3 weeks is your goal, then go six. Youll drink all of them and theyll be mediocre and the last one will be excellent and youll kick yourself fot not having patience.

 

the lighter the beer, typically the longer the conditioning. 

 

Condition / carb in a spot around 70 degrees to help speed up the process.

 

The lighter the beer the longer the conditioning eh?  Then I have definitely made some incorrect ASSumptions.

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3 hours ago, 76shovel said:

 

The lighter the beer the longer the conditioning eh?  Then I have definitely made some incorrect ASSumptions.

I am confused is that the case or not the case is 3 or 4 weeks conditioning american light enough or is 6 weeks best?

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2 hours ago, Timelordjason said:

I am confused is that the case or not the case is 3 or 4 weeks conditioning american light enough or is 6 weeks best?

The conditioning periods are only rules of thumb which work for most MrBeer recipes. Every beer recipe has a different conditioning period. In the case of the American Lite, 6 weeks minimum. As in every case, if you don't like your first bottle, let it condition longer. Some, like the American Porter are good after two weeks of conditioning, but are amazing after 6 months.

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2 hours ago, Timelordjason said:

I am confused is that the case or not the case is 3 or 4 weeks conditioning american light enough or is 6 weeks best?

Some rules of thumb from my experience and from the collective wisdom of this forum:
1) The lighter the beer, the longer it needs conditioning to eliminate any extract twang (aka Conway Twitty).
2) If you're doing a hoppy beer, #1 does not usually apply.  So things like IPAs and MRB recipes like Witch's Flight and Columbus's Cascading Amber can and should be enjoyed while still young.

3) Weizens don't need to condition long and you can start enjoying them at minimum conditioning time.

4) Darker beers such as stouts and porters are usually quite good right at the MRB recommended conditioning times.  But as with most non-hoppy beers, they improve with age.

5) If it's a high ABV brew it'll benefit from longer conditioning.

When in doubt about whether one of your brews is ready or not, put one in the fridge, let it sit for three days, then drink it.  If it tastes good to you, then the batch is good to go.  If not, let them rest for another few weeks, then try one again.  But even if you think the batch is great as is, it's always a good learning experience to keep a couple of bottles conditioning and trying them after longer periods of aging.  I've done that and learned:
1)  Yes, IPAs ARE best while young.  The hops do fade after a while.  What's left is still tasty but it's not what you'd consider an IPA.

2)  A "meh" beer can become a quite enjoyable beer.  This happened for me with Heavy McWee which was "meh" at minimum conditioning time but became really tasty after another couple of months.
3)  The high ABV brews like Lock Stock & Bourbon Barrel Stout can become absolutely fantastic given time.  It's been 15 months since I bottled my batch, we had some today, and it knocked everybody's socks off it was so good.

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27 minutes ago, Shrike said:

Some rules of thumb from my experience and from the collective wisdom of this forum:
1) The lighter the beer, the longer it needs conditioning to eliminate any extract twang (aka Conway Twitty).
2) If you're doing a hoppy beer, #1 does not usually apply.  So things like IPAs and MRB recipes like Witch's Flight and Columbus's Cascading Amber can and should be enjoyed while still young.

3) Weizens don't need to condition long and you can start enjoying them at minimum conditioning time.

4) Darker beers such as stouts and porters are usually quite good right at the MRB recommended conditioning times.  But as with most non-hoppy beers, they improve with age.

5) If it's a high ABV brew it'll benefit from longer conditioning.

When in doubt about whether one of your brews is ready or not, put one in the fridge, let it sit for three days, then drink it.  If it tastes good to you, then the batch is good to go.  If not, let them rest for another few weeks, then try one again.  But even if you think the batch is great as is, it's always a good learning experience to keep a couple of bottles conditioning and trying them after longer periods of aging.  I've done that and learned:
1)  Yes, IPAs ARE best while young.  The hops do fade after a while.  What's left is still tasty but it's not what you'd consider an IPA.

2)  A "meh" beer can become a quite enjoyable beer.  This happened for me with Heavy McWee which was "meh" at minimum conditioning time but became really tasty after another couple of months.
3)  The high ABV brews like Lock Stock & Bourbon Barrel Stout can become absolutely fantastic given time.  It's been 15 months since I bottled my batch, we had some today, and it knocked everybody's socks off it was so good.

My "meh" recipe was the Churchill Brown Ale. After double the suggested conditioning time, my family was wrestling bottles out of my hands.

The longest I've been able to condition my beer has been 12 months. The temptation has been too great.

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 These days my minimum is 2 months from mix to taste.  3 weeks fermenting, 3 weeks carbination at 70-75, then back to the basement at 65-68 for a minimum of 2 weeks until I choose to cool one off.  If I can behave myself my stouts, porters and such are cellared at least 3 months before I give up. I have two batches of Lock, Stock, and Barrell that should be ready for a taste this coming fall.  I made some Yule Like this Ale should be ready but I am wondering if I can hold off until Christmas 2018. My Voodoo is taunting me. :lol:

 

The above method gets a little expensive with the oxygen barrier 750 ml bottles.

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Most of the above seams to apply for ales.  

 

I have a question regarding lagers.  I brewed the Zombie Fest lager on December 27th.  Fermented at 55 degrees for 3 weeks.  Raised the temp to 65 for 3 days for a di-acetal rest.  I then cold crashed it down to 34 over a few days and racked it to secondary, and it is in secondary at 34 degrees for 4 weeks.  I plan to bottle around Feb 20th.  Clearly I need about 2-3 weeks for carbonation, but do I also still need additional time for conditioning?  Or was the 4 week lagering period considered the conditioning time?

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34 minutes ago, Bad Andy said:

Most of the above seams to apply for ales.  

 

I have a question regarding lagers.  I brewed the Zombie Fest lager on December 27th.  Fermented at 55 degrees for 3 weeks.  Raised the temp to 65 for 3 days for a di-acetal rest.  I then cold crashed it down to 34 over a few days and racked it to secondary, and it is in secondary at 34 degrees for 4 weeks.  I plan to bottle around Feb 20th.  Clearly I need about 2-3 weeks for carbonation, but do I also still need additional time for conditioning?  Or was the 4 week lagering period considered the conditioning time?

I would count that as conditioning time personally. It was off the big yeast cake. Between the 4 weeks lagering and the 2 weeks carbing i think you should be ok to try one after your three days in the fridge of course...

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