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Lorenzai

Bready beer?

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Does the proprietary ale yeast that Mr. Beer includes with their cans of HME contribute a bakers yeasty / bread smell to your beer? Or is my beer just too green still? I've noticed that in my newest batch that's still in the LBK finishing up. On top of that, I had one bottle from my 1st batch that was only about 1/5th full or so. It got stiff quicker than the others so I threw it in the fridge for awhile so I could give it a taste. It wasn't actually carbonated and the beer was cidery and weird tasting. Is that from the little secondary fermentation that happened from the carb drop? The only way I can describe it is that it tasted like dumpster water lol. I haven't cracked any of the full bottles yet because they're not ready but I wanted to see how it was coming along so I chose the partial bottle for a taste.   I'm really hoping that taste clears up and that my second batch doesn't taste like a loaf of bread with hops (or worse) - lol. 

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34 minutes ago, RickBeer said:

Had it been in the bottle 4 weeks?

Nope, just about 2 or a little over. There was so little in that last bottle of the batch I figured it would be oxidized from all the headspace in the bottle so I just went ahead and chilled it and gave it a try. I'm mainly hoping that the rest of the batch doesn't come out that way after it goes another 2 weeks.  The full bottles are starting to firm up pretty well.

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cidery = fermented too hot

 

bready = youre probably getting trub kicked up in your beer.. slow steady pours

 

too much head space that produces oxidation =  cardboard or how some describe wet dog fur smells (at least that's how I perceive it)

 

best thing new brewers can learn besides patience and following instructions, is temperature control. 

 

 

 

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16 hours ago, zorak1066 said:

cidery = fermented too hot

 

bready = youre probably getting trub kicked up in your beer.. slow steady pours

 

too much head space that produces oxidation =  cardboard or how some describe wet dog fur smells (at least that's how I perceive it)

 

best thing new brewers can learn besides patience and following instructions, is temperature control. 

 

 

 

I learned something about the cidery taste myself. After 2 weeks fermentation there was a cidery taste to it but after 3 weeks the cidery taste vanished. I think sometimes the cidery taste can come from the batch not being ready yet. 

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On 2/7/2018 at 3:38 AM, zorak1066 said:

cidery = fermented too hot

 

bready = youre probably getting trub kicked up in your beer.. slow steady pours

 

too much head space that produces oxidation =  cardboard or how some describe wet dog fur smells (at least that's how I perceive it)

 

best thing new brewers can learn besides patience and following instructions, is temperature control. 

 

 

 

Zorak I think that you might be right. I think my beer was fermented too hot. I was under the impression that a normal room temp of 66-72f would be fine, and it would be if fermentation did not generate it's own heat. I was reading that fermentation can kick temps up an additional 10f for really vigorous fermentation and so even if your room temp is where it should be, that doesn't necessarily mean that your fermentation is at that temperature.  That would be a nice tid-bit of info to include in the Mr. Beer pamphlet that comes with kits in the future. Regardless, I think I'll be able to get away with it for my second batch because it has a quite hoppy profile. Hopefully it will mask my newb mistake and come out passable. I'm investing in a bottle capper and going to glass bottles so if it needs to sit for a good long time to mature it will be able to.

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2 hours ago, Lorenzai said:

Zorak I think that you might be right. I think my beer was fermented too hot. I was under the impression that a normal room temp of 66-72f would be fine, and it would be if fermentation did not generate it's own heat. I was reading that fermentation can kick temps up an additional 10f for really vigorous fermentation and so even if your room temp is where it should be, that doesn't necessarily mean that your fermentation is at that temperature.  That would be a nice tid-bit of info to include in the Mr. Beer pamphlet that comes with kits in the future. Regardless, I think I'll be able to get away with it for my second batch because it has a quite hoppy profile. Hopefully it will mask my newb mistake and come out passable. I'm investing in a bottle capper and going to glass bottles so if it needs to sit for a good long time to mature it will be able to.

 

66-72 is the sweet spot. We are always referring to ambient temps, not the temps inside the keg.

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50 minutes ago, MRB Josh R said:

 

66-72 is the sweet spot. We are always referring to ambient temps, not the temps inside the keg.

Well you give me hope then! Hopefully the beer is just too young and it will be wonderful when it matures. Thanks.

I ordered a fermometer so I can track and control the temps more accurately than that yeast thermometer thing.

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1 hour ago, RickBeer said:

Yeast thermometer?

 

Picture if you will, mother yeast at the trubside of little baby yeast, "I don't feel good mama yeast", so the dutiful mother yeast pulls out the yeast thermometer and takes his yeasty temperature.  Ahhhhhh, a veritable beery Norman Rockwell moment brought to you by Malt, grain and Mr. Beer.

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1 hour ago, SilverBrewerWI said:

 

Picture if you will, mother yeast at the trubside of little baby yeast, "I don't feel good mama yeast", so the dutiful mother yeast pulls out the yeast thermometer and takes his yeasty temperature.  Ahhhhhh, a veritable beery Norman Rockwell moment brought to you by Malt, grain and Mr. Beer.

HA!

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when i first started mr beer kits my fermentation room was an enclosed shower full of tile. we keep the ac in the  house around 66f ... so while i was brewing (in florida 'winter') my ambient temp was about 64-66f. during that time i had many wild fermentations , and i cant recall ever getting that green apple cider taste.  even the fromunda yeast from under the lid, can go a little warm in the lbk and you will still be fine.  even older fromunda yeast never gave me much trouble.  the one yeast i have used that was quick to make apple cider was us04.  it naturally produces fruity esters as it gets hot so ferment at the lower end of the optimal temps. . . unless you like apple cider.  it also eats like a monster.  i would guess that about 90% of the time that i have used us04, i have had ballistic fermentations that generated a lot of heat. since that first ciderfest in a stout i strive for my chiller box to be about 58f when using it , at least for the first week. 

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On 2/7/2018 at 3:38 AM, zorak1066 said:

cidery = fermented too hot

 

bready = youre probably getting trub kicked up in your beer.. slow steady pours

 

too much head space that produces oxidation =  cardboard or how some describe wet dog fur smells (at least that's how I perceive it)

 

best thing new brewers can learn besides patience and following instructions, is temperature control. 

 

 

 

You were right. It was a trub bottle that I originally drank.  I just tried a full bottle out this time and it was MUCH much better. The carbonation was OK but not quite there yet. The beer was weak as can be considering it was only the 1 can of HME and nothing else, but it was drinkable for sure. I drank it no problems nice and cold. As I got down to about the last 2 inches some sediment stirred up and it tasted exactly the same as what I was complaining about before. It was just nasty yeast flavor. So I gotta be careful about my pours and it'll all be good! I'm just happy that I tried it and it's passable, so I guess that means I'm a 'real' brewer now! Lol.

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just remember your first kits are more to learn than to make great beer.  mr beer starter kits make things as simple as possible. once you get a few kits in, and develop good brewing habits you'll start getting into more complicated kits and additions... and making awesome beer. 

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My package arrived from Mr. Beer today. A day early I might add. Got a bottle capper, 144 caps, bottle cleaning brush, hydrometer, proper temperature strip, a muslin bag, and some extra sanitizer.   I wasn't able to get an initial hydrometer reading of my beer since I didn't have one yet, but I just pulled a sample a minute ago and it is very close to what QBrew says my final gravity should be. I drank the sample too and it was pretty darn good! You can taste the bitterness from the .75oz of willamette that I boiled for 30 min and the .25oz I added at flameout. It has a nice subtle floral aftertaste that goes pretty well with the can of American Light + 1LB of Briess Amber DME. It's like a light beer version of a pale ale. I think it's ready to go into bottles whenever I'm ready!

photo_2018-02-14_16-51-41.jpg

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