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Fire Rooster

Suggestions-Thoughts ?

41 posts in this topic

First post, new brewer.

Received LBK kit for Christmas.

Just started 3rd brew, 1st-Long Play, 2nd-Diablo, 3rd-Bewitched.

 

1. Fermenting temperature range for 3 weeks @ 62-69 (monitoring with 2 stick-on gauges on keg)

2. Warm condition 4 weeks @ steady 71-72 (in cooler with ink-bird & seedling heat pad).

3. Cool condition 4 weeks @ steady 55 (basement floor)

 

Suggestions/thoughts ?

Thanks

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Put one of those Long Plays in the fridge for three days and see how it turned out. If it has conditioned for four weeks, it should be ready to go.

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That's too warm.  I suggest you put a bottle in the frig for 3 days, and then compare it side by side with one you stored on your basement floor at 55.  You'll notice a huge difference.

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RickBeer, thanks

I read most of that but not all, I'll check it out, thanks,

 

I'll take your suggestion and do a side by side comparison.

I'm curious on the outcome, a (40 degree) chilled beer in a room temperature mug vs

a cooled (55 degree) beer into a frozen mug.

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Fire Rooster,

 

I always chill my beers to refrigerator temperature and then depending on the style, either drink them as soon as I pour or let them warm after poured before drinking.  Darker beers are better warmer and lighter colored beers tend to be better colder.

 

Just my 2 cents.

 

Dawg

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BDawg62, thanks

 

Never thought of that, style of beer serving temp.

Personal preference in addition to all this. I seemed

to settle in the Ale category with IPA’s being my favorite.

I’m in no rush, too much time & effort to be sampling not

ready for prime time.

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IPAs don't need as much time to condition. The longer they condition the more the hop bitterness will mellow out. That's why they say you can drink them when they are "young". I just had a Long Play after three weeks bottled and it was delicious. It is not a very bitter beer to begin with. So, it will be interesting to see how it transforms over time.

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Marius, thanks

 

Long play was my first.  I have 5 weeks till I drink my first home made brew.

I'm keeping the LBK busy, when Bewitched is done Oktoberfest is next.

Building an inventory with hopes of a long spell of great tasting beer.

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I hear you. I just brewed my fifth beer and have two little brown kegs going. I will have to slow down at some point because of all the bottles needed to accommodate that much beer. I don't know if my rate of consumption will match the output. It has been fascinating to learn and many of the guys on here are endless kegs of knowledge. Not me- I am new too. Good luck.

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16 minutes ago, Marius said:

I hear you. I just brewed my fifth beer and have two little brown kegs going. I will have to slow down at some point because of all the bottles needed to accommodate that much beer. I don't know if my rate of consumption will match the output. It has been fascinating to learn and many of the guys on here are endless kegs of knowledge. Not me- I am new too. Good luck.

Before @RickBeer steps in here and issues a citation :lol:.  Slowing down because of quantity of beer is not an option.  I have over 500 bottles in my inventory that are either full or waiting to be filled.  If you find you have too much beer to drink yourself, let your friends know you brew and that will never be a problem again.

Bonsai & Brew, Cato, kedogn and 2 others like this

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1 hour ago, Fire Rooster said:

RickBeer, thanks

I read most of that but not all, I'll check it out, thanks,

 

I'll take your suggestion and do a side by side comparison.

I'm curious on the outcome, a (40 degree) chilled beer in a room temperature mug vs

a cooled (55 degree) beer into a frozen mug.

 

Serving beer in a frozen mug is big no-no.  You want the mug room temp, or refrigerated, then flushed with cool tap water, then filled.  Never frozen.

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18 minutes ago, RickBeer said:

 

Serving beer in a frozen mug is big no-no.  You want the mug room temp, or refrigerated, then flushed with cool tap water, then filled.  Never frozen.

If that is how he (or anyone) likes it... how can it be wrong?

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Two sealed gallons of refrigerated spring water are used for the LBK process.

There is a small amount of water left in 2nd gallon when filled to second line.

 

Is there an issue if filled a little over the 2nd line on the LBK ?

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2 hours ago, Fire Rooster said:

RickBeer, thanks

I read most of that but not all, I'll check it out, thanks,

 

I'll take your suggestion and do a side by side comparison.

I'm curious on the outcome, a (40 degree) chilled beer in a room temperature mug vs

a cooled (55 degree) beer into a frozen mug.

 

Keep in mind that you'll want to put the beer in the fridge for three days before drinking.  This allows the CO2 to get absorbed back into the beer.

Like BDawg62, I drink mine at different temperatures depending on the style.  Lighter beers I pour straight out of the fridge.  Stouts and Porters sit on the counter for 15ish minutes before I uncap and pour.  IMNSHO they taste much better when allowed to warm up a little bit before drinking, with complexities and subtleties that are otherwise not present when drank straight from the fridge.

Oh, and welcome to the hobby!

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I have a neighbor who home brews and he never refrigerates. Bottle conditions for 4 weeks, moves them to the basement where it's upper 50's and drinks them. To each his own I guess.

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20 minutes ago, gophers6 said:

I have a neighbor who home brews and he never refrigerates. Bottle conditions for 4 weeks, moves them to the basement where it's upper 50's and drinks them. To each his own I guess.

 If it works, it works, and who's to tell him different.

 

I have some lagers sitting in an old wine fridge at 54*.  When they're ready to drink, maybe I'll do an experiment and put one in the beer fridge for three days. Then I'll take it and one straight from the wine fridge and pour them and do a side-by-side taste test.

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Looks to me like you got it all squared away.  Hey, welcome to the group.  Oh, I don't use any soap on my beer glasses and I never chill the glass.  That is my preference, if yours makes you happy, march on and make more beer.

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8 hours ago, RickBeer said:

That's too warm.  I suggest you put a bottle in the frig for 3 days, and then compare it side by side with one you stored on your basement floor at 55.  You'll notice a huge difference.

They say 12 deg C for storage in the article for conditioned beer. That is 53.5deg F . Hmm.

They do not say what temp tp store it at when you are conditioning - am I being pedantic? lol.

I also am not sure about the beer gushing if stored to warm, providing one refrigerates the beer before opening. Unless the beer is heated or cooled to be dormant or dies, I would expect it to eat all the sugar it can. The major difference will be how fast it does it. If it gushes there is too much fermentable sugar - or you are opening it at too high a temperature. Refrigerating (which the article does not recommend) allows the carbonation to settle in and also reduces chance of gusher.

If you plan on opening it at 55 deg, you need less carbonation drops.

 

 

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8 hours ago, BDawg62 said:

Fire Rooster,

 

I always chill my beers to refrigerator temperature and then depending on the style, either drink them as soon as I pour or let them warm after poured before drinking.  Darker beers are better warmer and lighter colored beers tend to be better colder.

 

Just my 2 cents.

 

Dawg

I would pour it cold and let it warm in the glass. Less gushing opportunity. It will get a little flatter though.

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1 hour ago, RickBeer said:

So, because others think it’s wrong, doesn’t mean people shouldn’t enjoy the way they want to?  Hmmm. I fully disagree. 

 

Yes, I get that “studies show”... but then again, I enjoy damn near all my beers from a “Pint Glass” and if you are true to your form, you will say that’s a, how’d you say it, “No-No”!  

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7 minutes ago, kedogn said:

So, because others think it’s wrong, doesn’t mean people shouldn’t enjoy the way they want to?  Hmmm. I fully disagree. 

I agree, any blanket statement made about how you should enjoy your beverage is borderline snobbery in my opinion. I encountered this a lot in the craft beer scene. Lot of people telling you what you aught to be enjoying. I think some get so caught up in etiquette and this view of what beer should be that they forget to just enjoy it. Hundreds of thousands of people drink Budweiser directly out of a can every day and are satisfied with it. Are they wrong? I don't think so. Since taste is so subjective it's hard to tell anyone their way is wrong.

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