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45 minutes ago, andy73 said:

How much hops do you need to add to get big hop flavor.

Depends on how you add them. Either Late Boil, or just simply do a “Hop Stand” , “steep” or “whirlpool”. 

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For reference, here are the recipes that Mr. Beer lists as having a "hoppy" flavor profile.  The ones that I have brewed on that list that had hop additions called from anywhere from two to four 1/2oz. packages of hops (well, I haven't brewed Thunder Bay yet which calls for four packets of hops, but it's seventh in my brew queue).  Most of the ones using hop additions are pale ales.  Witch's Flight and Santa Rita Pale Ale both use two packets of hops and are two of my favorite hoppy beers (I had some family visit a few weeks ago and the Santa Rita was a favorite of everyone's, even preferred over some beers we had while out at dinner several times).  I highly recommend either of those recipes if you want to taste what hops added at flame-out or as a dry hop can add to a recipe.

If you're looking at trying your own thing, you'll want to reference the handy dandy hop chart.  For maximum flavor, you'll see that a hop boil of 20 minutes is used.  But even a short hop boil for aroma or as previously mentioned added at flame-out or dry-hopped will augment flavor.  This is because aroma adds so much to taste.
 

Hop Chart.jpg

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Also - Research the different hop varieties. They differ greatly in hop "character" and in their use. Some are more citrus like, others earthy. Some are better for bitterness, others for aroma. Some complement English Brown ales, others lighter lagers. Often, if you are after a certain beer "clone", the hop variety can make all the difference (as well as how it is used). 

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3 hours ago, kedogn said:

Depends on how you add them. Either Late Boil, or just simply do a “Hop Stand” , “steep” or “whirlpool”. 

 Sorry if this is a dumb question but what does whirlpool mean? I've seen it multiple times on this forum and also from different breweries and I'm just curious to know what exactly it is.

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1 hour ago, Brian N. said:

Also - Research the different hop varieties. They differ greatly in hop "character" and in their use. Some are more citrus like, others earthy. Some are better for bitterness, others for aroma. Some complement English Brown ales, others lighter lagers. Often, if you are after a certain beer "clone", the hop variety can make all the difference (as well as how it is used). 

I can make a 60 IBU beer with cascade and citra with little to no bitterness or i can make a 60 IBU beer with simcoe and galena and have a hop bomb. Perceived bitterness and co-humulone, those are what you look at vs just alpha acid levels.

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10 hours ago, youdontknowme311 said:

 

 Sorry if this is a dumb question but what does whirlpool mean? I've seen it multiple times on this forum and also from different breweries and I'm just curious to know what exactly it is.

 

When the pump is is set to pull wort from the bottom side and bring it back on the side, creating a whirlpool which makes all the trub pile in the center.

 

This is a picture of the pile of trub on a 7 barrel batch.  The wort is slowly draining out the side after the completing of whirlpool.

 

 

IMG_20170124_171416984.jpg

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I got plenty enough hops to be quite distinctive in Cooper's Draft, augmenting with a 10 min boil of a mix of Zythos, Amarillo and Nelson Sauvin (0.25 oz each) and a 1 week dry hop of same mix amount. ( I was using up old hops but it turned out good.)

So that adds up to a total of 1.5 oz. in an LBK batch.

 

I just made a Cooper's PIlsener with added Saaz hops  and as experiment added following hop treatments dividing the 6 gal batch into 3 LBKs

Yeast was Coopers packet (a mix of ale and lager yeasts that came with the kit)+ 1 pkt of 34/70 all mixed up and divided 3 ways. 

1. added 0.5 oz at flameout.  (fermented in low 60's)

2. added 0.5 oz 15 min boil (then removed) and  added 0.5 oz at flameout  (left in LBK).  (fermented in low 60's)

3  added 0.5 oz 15 min boil (then removed) and  added 0.5 oz at flameout   (left in LBK) then added 0.5 oz dry hop 1 week. (fermented in 50's)

I have found that lagers I have had recently have not had the stiff hopping of some European lagers that I like so I wanted to see what this did.

 

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11 hours ago, youdontknowme311 said:

 

 Sorry if this is a dumb question but what does whirlpool mean? I've seen it multiple times on this forum and also from different breweries and I'm just curious to know what exactly it is.

Thanks for asking, so glad I was able to answer this for you lol ;) 

But yes, what they both said is true...  however, I was referring to Whirlpool hops, since your question was about hop flavor.  So, with that said, the basis is that you lower your wort temp some so that you don't get the bitterness from the hop, only the flavor/aroma.   Most of our IPAs use a 30-40 minute long whirlpool.  To get the desired effect, you need to be really heavy handed with your hops though.  Sadly, this can up the price of your beer by a lot (especially if you are not buying in bulk, but if it is what you want, then its worth it, yeah?). 

In a couple weeks we will be doing a SMaSH using Maris Otter and El Dorado (should come in at 6%).  It will only have a very small amount for bittering, with the rest of it back loaded HEAVY to get the flavor where we want it (aka big @ss hop flavor!).   I am really looking forward to that one to see how it turns out.  :) Btw, yes, even during whirlpool, you will still pull some bitterness, thus adding to the IBUs, but it wont be as much.  I've seen where brewers have ONLY done late addition/whirpool hopping to hit their marks.  I have yet to really try that (as the amount of hops you need REALLY goes up)... but I will... soon enough :)

Btw, as Rick said, when you whirlpool it also helps cone up the trub in the middle of your kettle for you.  which allows you to pull off a much cleaner/clearer wort... that is a very good thing.  This can be done with a pump (as we do - you can see in this pic the 2 ports.  We pull from the bottom one and it flows out, via the pump and back in via the top port, which sprays it along side of the kettle, thus spinning the wort into a whirlpool).  You should see this on a 15 BBL system... OH MY! :)

Notice the huge mound of hops/trub. None of that will end up in our fermenter, thus making a cleaner/clearer beer.
whirlpool.thumb.jpeg.08e388c92f99c7bf9a3c7193591142c2.jpeg

 

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I recently brewed an all grain New England Tropical IPA and I added most of my seven ounces of hops as late addition. Bittering hop was Citra at 60, flavor and aroma hops were Stonefruit, Simcoe and Mosaic at 15 minutes and the rest were flameout and dry hop. Sorry, the recipe is a closely guarded secrete so I will not post. 

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A quick question. I would like to try and do a hoppy addition in my next batch. I know that the hops need some malt in the boil to adhere to, but are you better off doing your hop additions with a small amount of wort or a large amount? From what I've read I under stand that keeping the wort SG below 1.04 helps bring out more hop bitterness and flavor. The higher the SG of the wort the hop presence decreases. Is this correct? Maybe some of you more expierienced brewers could help out with what youv've tried and succeeded at.

 

I love IPA's and would love to do a copycat of the Lagunitas Born Yesterday IPA. They were using Amarillo, Simcoe, Mosaic, and 1 other that I can't think of at this time. Of course the entire hopping schedule is an unknown, but it was very floral without being overly bitter. Best IPA I've had with GreenFlash brewing West Coast IPA Soul style number 2.

 

Thanks

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4 hours ago, C-Note 1959 said:

A quick question. I would like to try and do a hoppy addition in my next batch. I know that the hops need some malt in the boil to adhere to, but are you better off doing your hop additions with a small amount of wort or a large amount? From what I've read I under stand that keeping the wort SG below 1.04 helps bring out more hop bitterness and flavor. The higher the SG of the wort the hop presence decreases. Is this correct? Maybe some of you more expierienced brewers could help out with what youv've tried and succeeded at.

 

I love IPA's and would love to do a copycat of the Lagunitas Born Yesterday IPA. They were using Amarillo, Simcoe, Mosaic, and 1 other that I can't think of at this time. Of course the entire hopping schedule is an unknown, but it was very floral without being overly bitter. Best IPA I've had with GreenFlash brewing West Coast IPA Soul style number 2.

 

Thanks

The more malt the less utilization youll get. Its called “the bigness factor”. You’ll need some malt in your boil to get the hops to do what they do. Volume wont matter, im sure your speaking in terms of how much water to add to a soft pack or dme. Then i guess volume would matter... if youre following me. Im not sure how much water to add since thats not how i brew. Personally if you’re only going for the flavors then id just dry hop it and not worry so much of the boil. A ten minute boil or a nice dry hop addition, you choose

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