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Jim Doherty

Left over yeast packs

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I have a bunch of left over yeast packs, not too old, from recipes that called for a different yeast. Was wondering what to do with them. I was wondering if I could use them to ferment some apple cider/ apple juice. Does anyone know if that would work? Then the next question would be, how much cider in the LBK. Should it be diluted with water? Maybe time to experiment.........

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Jim,

 

You can use the old yeast packs for many things.  First of all, keep them stored in the refrigerator to preserve them and they should remain viable for about 2 years. 

 

1.  You can use them to ferment cider, mead, other beers

2.  You can add them to your water that you boil to be used as yeast nutrient, boiling them will kill them and then the yeast you pitch will feed on them.

3.  Just hang onto them as a backup in the event you find that you have a bad pack of yeast and of course the LHBS is closed.  Use these in this type of emergency.

 

Dawg

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Thanks Dawg! Do you think 2 gallons of store bought apple cider would work to make it like a Hard Cider? And if so, would I follow the same 3 in the keg, 3 in the bottle to carb and then 3 or more weeks to condition rule would apply?

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22 minutes ago, Jim Doherty said:

Thanks Dawg! Do you think 2 gallons of store bought apple cider would work to make it like a Hard Cider? And if so, would I follow the same 3 in the keg, 3 in the bottle to carb and then 3 or more weeks to condition rule would apply?

Jim,

 

I have never made cider so I will have to pass this on to one of the cider makers here so that I don't give you bad information.

 

Dawg

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9 hours ago, Jim Doherty said:

Thanks Dawg! Do you think 2 gallons of store bought apple cider would work to make it like a Hard Cider? And if so, would I follow the same 3 in the keg, 3 in the bottle to carb and then 3 or more weeks to condition rule would apply?

 

From someone who had done this..... Make sure your cider is only been UV light treated or pasturized ONLY! If it has preservatives in it it will not work since one of the preservatives loves to kill yeast.

 

That said, No need to Dilute with water, or add anything but yeast. I like to use cider from a local orchard and it turns out great, not too dry but not as sweet as say a Reds (see linked post above by Rickbeer)

 

I follow the 3-4-3 with my cider... 3 weeks ferment, 4 weeks carb/condition minimum, 3 days in fridge before drinking.

 

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Thanks everyone for the advice! Question for hotrod3539- do you follow the same rule as for carbonating beer? For example, I use 3/4 tablespoon per 12 oz bottle as per the chart on the website. Organic apple cider, pasteurized, is on sale this week at the local grocery store so will give it a shot.  Not much to lose if it doesn't work but about $3.00.

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7 hours ago, Jim Doherty said:

Thanks everyone for the advice! Question for hotrod3539- do you follow the same rule as for carbonating beer? For example, I use 3/4 tablespoon per 12 oz bottle as per the chart on the website. Organic apple cider, pasteurized, is on sale this week at the local grocery store so will give it a shot.  Not much to lose if it doesn't work but about $3.00.

 

Jim, Depending on how you like your carbonation level, 1/2-3/4 tablespoon would be just fine, any more than that and you might get really overcarbonated and possibly bottle bombs... which is not fun. For me and the wife, we like it a little less carbonated so 1/2 Tablespoon worked perfect for us. You could test which you like better by doing some 1/2 and some 3/4 (make sure you mark which bottles are which) so you would know for next time you do it. Cheers!

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