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youdontknowme311

NEIPA Bottle Conditioning

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So I have a batch of American Resolution fermenting and The Best Haze Of Our Lives up on deck. I've been reading a lot of negative things about bottle conditioning the NEIPA style because of oxidation and the beers turning a brown muddy color only after a few weeks in the bottle.  I've read that most people prefer to keg this style of beer to avoid that. So my question is why does that happen so often with this style and any advice on how to avoid it?

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8 hours ago, youdontknowme311 said:

So I have a batch of American Resolution fermenting and The Best Haze Of Our Lives up on deck. I've been reading a lot of negative things about bottle conditioning the NEIPA style because of oxidation and the beers turning a brown muddy color only after a few weeks in the bottle.  I've read that most people prefer to keg this style of beer to avoid that. So my question is why does that happen so often with this style and any advice on how to avoid it?

 

I couldn't tell you why it happens, but I can say that it didn't happen to any of my American Resolution.

 

Keep in mind that this style of beer is meant to be enjoyed young, while the hop aroma is still strong.  I started drinking mine around 26 March, a mere two weeks after bottling.  I have one left.  The ones I've had the past two weeks are noticeably different than the first ones I had.  They're still very good, but that wonderful hop aroma has started to fade.

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12 hours ago, youdontknowme311 said:

So I have a batch of American Resolution fermenting and The Best Haze Of Our Lives up on deck. I've been reading a lot of negative things about bottle conditioning the NEIPA style because of oxidation and the beers turning a brown muddy color only after a few weeks in the bottle.  I've read that most people prefer to keg this style of beer to avoid that. So my question is why does that happen so often with this style and any advice on how to avoid it?

 

To minimize oxidation, use a bottling wand rather than filling straight from the spigot. You can also add ascorbic acid (vitamin c) to the batch at bottling. The rate would be half a teaspoon per 2 gallons. Vitamin C is an antioxidant and will help preserve the hop oils. While kegging is preferred for this style of beer, you can still bottle it successfully as long as you keep the carbonating temps moderate. Don't go above 75 or this will promote oxidation. Also, glass bottles or Oxy barrier bottles might help prevent oxidation.

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41 minutes ago, MRB Josh R said:

 

To minimize oxidation, use a bottling wand rather than filling straight from the spigot. You can also add ascorbic acid (vitamin c) to the batch at bottling. The rate would be half a teaspoon per 2 gallons. Vitamin C is an antioxidant and will help preserve the hop oils. While kegging is preferred for this style of beer, you can still bottle it successfully as long as you keep the carbonating temps moderate. Don't go above 75 or this will promote oxidation. Also, glass bottles or Oxy barrier bottles might help prevent oxidation.

 

Thanks Josh. Just curious how would I add vitamin C to the batch? I always use a bottling wand and carbonate in glass around 68-70 so I should be good in that aspect. Is the way you dry hop this style that the hops oils seem to oxidize much faster? 

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1 minute ago, youdontknowme311 said:

 

Thanks Josh. Just curious how would I add vitamin C to the batch? I always use a bottling wand and carbonate in glass around 68-70 so I should be good in that aspect. Is the way you dry hop this style that the hops oils seem to oxidize much faster? 

 

No. Dry-hopping during active fermentation doesn't introduce oxidation at all due to the amount of Co2 present. You'd need to either batch prime and add the vitamin c with your priming sugar then or split up half teaspoon between the bottles. Either way, do it at bottling.

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15 hours ago, RickBeer said:

A 20+ year brewer swears by a pinch of cinnamon in all his batches to prevent oxidation.  #OldBrewerTale?  Charlie Papazian also does it.  

That is interesting, Is the cinnamon introduced after fermentation?

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