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76shovel

3 days worth chillin'

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I often read "only chill what you'll drink in 3 days"  Why? Is it to allow your beer to (possibly) develop more or are you doing it harm by long term refrigeration? 

I assume this is in reference to the ales because I also read I should keep the lagers cold.

 

Mark

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9 minutes ago, 76shovel said:

I often read "only chill what you'll drink in 3 days"  Why? Is it to allow your beer to (possibly) develop more or are you doing it harm by long term refrigeration? 

I assume this is in reference to the ales because I also read I should keep the lagers cold.

 

Mark

 

I do it to allow the ales to continue conditioning.  With the exception of really hoppy beers and weizens, every ale I've made has improved over time.

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1 hour ago, Shrike said:

 

I do it to allow the ales to continue conditioning.  With the exception of really hoppy beers and weizens, every ale I've made has improved over time.

Having just had my whispering wheat come online into the drinking rotation, are you saying that it gets worse over time? Or just doesn’t get better? Just had one with an orange slice last night. Pretty darn good. A little extract twang but tasty. 

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1 hour ago, Jdub said:

Having just had my whispering wheat come online into the drinking rotation, are you saying that it gets worse over time? Or just doesn’t get better? Just had one with an orange slice last night. Pretty darn good. A little extract twang but tasty. 

 

They don't get worse, they just doesn't seem to improve much if any.  One of the good things about Weizens (along with IPAs) is that they're ready to drink relatively quickly.  My Whispering Wheat hit minimum conditioning time 8 February and I had my first one that day.  I had the second-to-last one last night and it tasted pretty much like the first one.

I'm getting in the habit of not hanging on to Weizens and IPAs for months on end like I do with other brews.  I've been doing that with IPAs for the most part (the hoppiness is what they're about; why let them sit around for months and lose that?) but am starting to do it with the wheats, too.  No sense taking up space aging beers that get no benefit from it.

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6 hours ago, Shrike said:

 

They don't get worse, they just doesn't seem to improve much if any.  One of the good things about Weizens (along with IPAs) is that they're ready to drink relatively quickly.  My Whispering Wheat hit minimum conditioning time 8 February and I had my first one that day.  I had the second-to-last one last night and it tasted pretty much like the first one.

I'm getting in the habit of not hanging on to Weizens and IPAs for months on end like I do with other brews.  I've been doing that with IPAs for the most part (the hoppiness is what they're about; why let them sit around for months and lose that?) but am starting to do it with the wheats, too.  No sense taking up space aging beers that get no benefit from it.

  I found I have some rather old, like 6-7 months old, ThunderBay IPAs so I've been slowly using those up.  I have an American Hazy batch chilled and another Thunder Bay conditioning. I have no plans to brew more IPAs until those are dwindled.  The top level of my basement  fridge is IPAs and Wheats, The bottom is all Lagers, the racks next to the fridge are all stouts doing their time and some Ales I'm just not sure about yet. 

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11 hours ago, 76shovel said:

I often read "only chill what you'll drink in 3 days"  Why? Is it to allow your beer to (possibly) develop more or are you doing it harm by long term refrigeration? 

I assume this is in reference to the ales because I also read I should keep the lagers cold.

 

Mark

Beers are best stored, transported and conditioned cold. Lots of breweries will only distribute through people who ensure this will happen and will not sell to stores where their beer will be stored on the shelves unrefrigerated. This goes for ales and lagers.

 

You’re refrigerating them for three days to lock in the CO2. Ive never been able to taste the difference. 1 day, 1 month, all tastes the same to me. 

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19 hours ago, Shrike said:

 

They don't get worse, they just doesn't seem to improve much if any.  One of the good things about Weizens (along with IPAs) is that they're ready to drink relatively quickly.  My Whispering Wheat hit minimum conditioning time 8 February and I had my first one that day.  I had the second-to-last one last night and it tasted pretty much like the first one.

I'm getting in the habit of not hanging on to Weizens and IPAs for months on end like I do with other brews.  I've been doing that with IPAs for the most part (the hoppiness is what they're about; why let them sit around for months and lose that?) but am starting to do it with the wheats, too.  No sense taking up space aging beers that get no benefit from it.

I’ve already noticed my Thunder Bay ipa is losing its hoppiness. It was prominent at 1st but a month later the American ale hme flavor has taken over. 

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1 hour ago, Jdub said:

I’ve already noticed my Thunder Bay ipa is losing its hoppiness. It was prominent at 1st but a month later the American ale hme flavor has taken over. 

+1 on that! I'm thinking that as soon as those Hoppy beers are carbed enough to drink, they belong in the fridge to keep them fresh. My bottles of Deschuttes Fresh Squeezed IPA are bottle conditioned and it's printed on the label they must be kept refrigerated.

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On 5/26/2018 at 4:51 AM, 76shovel said:

I often read "only chill what you'll drink in 3 days"  Why? Is it to allow your beer to (possibly) develop more or are you doing it harm by long term refrigeration? 

I assume this is in reference to the ales because I also read I should keep the lagers cold.

 

Mark

 

At room temperature, Co2 is a gas, but at cold temps, it is a liquid. By allowing it to liquefy and lock into the beer, this guarantees a good carbonation from first to last drink. If you just refrigerate it overnight instead of a few days, you may have good carbonation when the beer is opened, but this will dissipate as you drink it, leaving the beer flat halfway through or so. This isn't always the case. Sometimes, it will stay carbonated just fine. But it's still always a good idea to let that Co2 lock into solution, just in case.

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The reason I say "only what you'll drink in 3 days" is often people say their beer needs more conditioning time, and that's best done at 70 or higher.  If you refrigerate all your beer (besides having a full fridge and a mad wife), the beer stops conditioning.


Once it's "perfect", then  yes, you'd want to keep it as cool as possible.

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56 minutes ago, MRB Josh R said:

 

At room temperature, Co2 is a gas, but at cold temps, it is a liquid. By allowing it to liquefy and lock into the beer, this guarantees a good carbonation from first to last drink. If you just refrigerate it overnight instead of a few days, you may have good carbonation when the beer is opened, but this will dissipate as you drink it, leaving the beer flat halfway through or so. This isn't always the case. Sometimes, it will stay carbonated just fine. But it's still always a good idea to let that Co2 lock into solution, just in case.

This is the best damn explanation I've heard in my three years on the forum. Don't get me wrong, I've followed the mantra and I knew it was best; I just didn't know the exact science of it (and I'm too lazy to look it up). 

Follow-up question: Does this only come into play with priming sugar/bottle carbing? 

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No, it comes into play for any carbonated beverage.  CO2 likes cold.  In cold, it combines with liquids.  As it warms, it comes out of suspension in the liquid.  That's why a warm beer tap line foams.  A commercial beer cooler (i.e. at a brewpub) had foam in the first glass of each pour each day.  Answer was that the 6 inches of hose between the cooler and the tap (i.e. the indent in the wall) was too warm.  A small fan mounted on the wall blew cold air into the indent and solved the problem.

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32 minutes ago, Big Sarge said:

This is the best damn explanation I've heard in my three years on the forum. Don't get me wrong, I've followed the mantra and I knew it was best; I just didn't know the exact science of it (and I'm too lazy to look it up). 

Follow-up question: Does this only come into play with priming sugar/bottle carbing? 

 

No, it is true for kegging, too. But when kegging, you need to chill the beer before adding the Co2 anyway so it dissolves into solution much faster than with priming.

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