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Gutterbunnie

First partial mash attempt & newbie mistakes

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Just wondering if anyone else has experienced any of these rookie mistakes & still had their beer turn out OK?  on Saturday afternoon, for my 9th batch, I  attempted a 2 gallon batch of Black Beer'd Porter for my first partial mash. Dry pitched 11g Nottingham yeast at 60F. First mistake, while steeping, I tried to keep temps between 155-165 - when I moved pot the dial on thermometer moved up to 170 but I think that was just briefly. I hope. Don't want any astringency. Steeped for 30 minutes. 2nd mistake, when I was cooling wort in ice bath in sink, lid off, I accidentally dropped an ice cube into my cooling wort. Wasn't thinking & plucked it out with fingers after I dunked them in sanitizer. I realized my mistake immediately after but it was like a reflex. Probably would have been better off just leaving the ice cube in there. Placed LBK into cooler with several frozen water bottles because we're having a heat wave  temps soared to over 80 in the house. No AC. So After 30 hrs of no activity, I checked the temps of cooler at the base & it was at about 47F! I was worried I put the yeast to sleep early on in the fermentation since I pitched at 60.  I took out the frozen bottles & replaced with some bottles filled with hot water to wake things up a bit.  I checked back in a few hours & fermentation seemed to take off - along with a slightly musty smell. Took out water bottles, then replaced with 2 frozen water bottles this morning. Today 52 hrs post-pitching, fermentation is strong & Krausen is almost reaching the lid of fermenter. Ambient temps in cooler are 61.  Just wondering what all the crazy spikes in temps are going to do to my beer in the end. Will have to wait  & see. I'll drink it anyway, and then do better next time:rolleyes:

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-  Momentarily hitting 170 shouldn't cause too much trouble.  If you'd stayed there for a while, that would be a different story.  I've done the same thing twice before and never noticed any astringent flavors.

-  Sanitizing your fingers before grabbing the ice cube was a good idea.  Putting your fingers in hot wort, on the other hand...well, just be glad it wasn't too hot.

-  I'm not an expert on yeast behavior, but those temp swings probably stressed out the yeast a bit.  That can cause off flavors.  The good thing is that BBP has some pretty complex, robust flavors.  So any off flavors might be very subdued.

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I have an electric range. When it's off, the burners are still hot and continue heating the pot. I knew that but figured I'd have time to set up a space on the counter with a couple old dish towels. My temps were over 180. No noticeable astringency. 

I agree with Shrike. In a complex beer like that, it's more forgiving of mistakes. Next time you make it you might think the 2nd batch just isn't as good as the first. LOL.

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On 6/5/2018 at 2:08 AM, Gutterbunnie said:

Just wondering if anyone else has experienced any of these rookie mistakes & still had their beer turn out OK?  on Saturday afternoon, for my 9th batch, I  attempted a 2 gallon batch of Black Beer'd Porter for my first partial mash. Dry pitched 11g Nottingham yeast at 60F. First mistake, while steeping, I tried to keep temps between 155-165 - when I moved pot the dial on thermometer moved up to 170 but I think that was just briefly. I hope. Don't want any astringency. Steeped for 30 minutes. 2nd mistake, when I was cooling wort in ice bath in sink, lid off, I accidentally dropped an ice cube into my cooling wort. Wasn't thinking & plucked it out with fingers after I dunked them in sanitizer. I realized my mistake immediately after but it was like a reflex. Probably would have been better off just leaving the ice cube in there. Placed LBK into cooler with several frozen water bottles because we're having a heat wave  temps soared to over 80 in the house. No AC. So After 30 hrs of no activity, I checked the temps of cooler at the base & it was at about 47F! I was worried I put the yeast to sleep early on in the fermentation since I pitched at 60.  I took out the frozen bottles & replaced with some bottles filled with hot water to wake things up a bit.  I checked back in a few hours & fermentation seemed to take off - along with a slightly musty smell. Took out water bottles, then replaced with 2 frozen water bottles this morning. Today 52 hrs post-pitching, fermentation is strong & Krausen is almost reaching the lid of fermenter. Ambient temps in cooler are 61.  Just wondering what all the crazy spikes in temps are going to do to my beer in the end. Will have to wait  & see. I'll drink it anyway, and then do better next time:rolleyes:

I made BBP earlier this year. I was adding heat to my pot during the steeping process and got distracted. Next thing I know the temp is 180-ish for a short while. I was really concerned. Beer turned out great. Better now that it’s several months conditioned. By the way I don’t cool the wort down ( ice bath ). The cold water in the lbk is sufficient for that unless you use excessive water for steeping. Good luck!

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Thanks for advice. As Pappazian says, you have to work really hard to screw up making homebrew! Best advice,  just RDWHAHB! Which I am able to do now that I have my pipeline going, some ready, some waiting to condition longer like the Kolsch & 1776 Ale. Kolsch after 3 wks conditioning is not bad but is young & needs to carbonate more. I ran out of fiz drops & used boiled DME. that was new! Which I heard can take a bit longer to carbonate. Live & learn:)

 

Will consider not doing ice bath next time. But it's a good way to get temps down fast if using slightly more water with the partial mashes. I started with about 2 quarts of water to steep but most boiled off after DME/hop boil.

 

So I took Scouterbill's advice & had a Voodoo. Yum!

20180528_175448.jpg

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Reporting back that it seems, despite my mistakes, BBP turned out pretty awesome:) I took hydrometer reading today which was at 1.008 after adjustments & decided to bottle before the heat wave this weekend. The sample was very tasty & I'm really happy the yeast was able to do it's job afterall! So it's seems that Notty is not a bad yeast to work with, and it settled nicely in the bottom of the LBK. I didn't even cold crash. And after bottling, the yeasty sample I tried  was really quite good so I think that Notty might be a go-to Ale yeast for me. The only thing I'm not too sure of  is if I used enough priming sugar. This time I boiled corn sugar  in about a cup of water & then added that liquid individually to each bottle. But I didn't break down the amount to go into each 12 oz bottle correctly & had some priming solution left over. It yielded 22 twelve oz bottles from this batch &  had about 8 tsp of the priming solution remaining - enough to put into 4 12 oz bottles. I don't have a priming bucket so I don't batch prime. Well, even if it's not super-carbonated, I'll drink it anyway because it tasted too good to waste. If anyone wants to chime in on carbonation for Porters - are they still good even if less carbonated? What I mean is are there some beers that are better less carbonated or more carbonated? Thank you to everyone who has encouraged & offered me advice along the way. I'm really enjoying this hobby (as you might have surmised). It's given me a good creative outlet outside of work, and luckily my hubby is very tolerant;) Just got my  somewhat used  *old motel*  mini fridge  - up & running in garage - already put a few beers in it to cellar  and/or lager until ready to drink or share. Cheers guys!

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I've never batch primed either, but had pretty good luck with those sugar dots, equal to 1/2 tsp, in 12 oz bottles. I like that Nottingham and US-05, as they are described as neutral yeasts with low esters.

 

Glad your beer turned out well!

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12 hours ago, Gutterbunnie said:

Reporting back that it seems, despite my mistakes, BBP turned out pretty awesome:) I took hydrometer reading today which was at 1.008 after adjustments & decided to bottle before the heat wave this weekend. The sample was very tasty & I'm really happy the yeast was able to do it's job afterall! So it's seems that Notty is not a bad yeast to work with, and it settled nicely in the bottom of the LBK. I didn't even cold crash. And after bottling, the yeasty sample I tried  was really quite good so I think that Notty might be a go-to Ale yeast for me. The only thing I'm not too sure of  is if I used enough priming sugar. This time I boiled corn sugar  in about a cup of water & then added that liquid individually to each bottle. But I didn't break down the amount to go into each 12 oz bottle correctly & had some priming solution left over. It yielded 22 twelve oz bottles from this batch &  had about 8 tsp of the priming solution remaining - enough to put into 4 12 oz bottles. I don't have a priming bucket so I don't batch prime. Well, even if it's not super-carbonated, I'll drink it anyway because it tasted too good to waste. If anyone wants to chime in on carbonation for Porters - are they still good even if less carbonated? What I mean is are there some beers that are better less carbonated or more carbonated? Thank you to everyone who has encouraged & offered me advice along the way. I'm really enjoying this hobby (as you might have surmised). It's given me a good creative outlet outside of work, and luckily my hubby is very tolerant;) Just got my  somewhat used  *old motel*  mini fridge  - up & running in garage - already put a few beers in it to cellar  and/or lager until ready to drink or share. Cheers guys!

 

Nottingham is a beast of a yeast.  It does its job and does it well.

As far as carbonation goes, I too use Domino Dots.  One cube is perfect for 12oz bottles for me, two for a pint or PET bottle.  So it's even easier to do than batch priming.

For my tastes, darker beers like stouts and porters and high ABV beers don't need to have a large amount of carbonation.  

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notty is a beast.. .but...  i found out at higher temps can produce banana esters. keep it cooler. treat it like us04's cousin.

 

remember every mistake you make has been done by just about everyone at one time or another.

 

partial mashing is a great way to gauge if you want to go all grain.  if you can handle pm, you can handle all grain. same thing just on a larger scale and with chemistry for water additions.

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18 hours ago, zorak1066 said:

notty is a beast.. .but...  i found out at higher temps can produce banana esters. keep it cooler. treat it like us04's cousin.

 

remember every mistake you make has been done by just about everyone at one time or another.

 

partial mashing is a great way to gauge if you want to go all grain.  if you can handle pm, you can handle all grain. same thing just on a larger scale and with chemistry for water additions.

You can say that again!

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Me too with the Dots. For some beers seasonals usually that overcarb for me - not that there are many of those left)  I will even do 1/2 dot per 12 oz 1 dot per 500/750 and 2 for 1L.,

Seems like you are on a good track. I use the warmer area on the stove to do the PM.

I use a kettle to get 175 deg water and after I pour it on the malt bag it ends up at 150-160. deg.

Occasionally it needs a boost from a regular burner to come up to temp but usually OK.

 

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