Jump to content
Mr.Beer Community

Recommended Posts

It is not important why this happened, it just is. Question- Will pitching two different yeasts in the same wort have no noticeable effect, or start some sort of yeast battle that will stress out one of the varieties? I’m sure this will result in some interesting comments. Hopefully one that is the truth.....so bring it on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually, blending yeast strains is quite common and shouldn't have any negative effect on your beer. White Labs has a good guide to blending strains if you want more in-depth info on the subject. You can find that HERE (opens as a .pdf file).

 

Let's say you want some esters from one yeast, but the attenuation of another yeast. Blending them will give you both features. Sometimes I bottle certain beers with a wine yeast to give a brighter, and more aggressive carbonation level similar to sparkling wines. I do this for some saisons, sours, etc. And I use a blend of 2 different yeasts for some of my hazy IPAs and pale ales.

 

I also have a yeast/bacteria blend that has 2 Saccharomyces yeast strains, 2 Pediococcus P. strains (bacteria), a Pediococcus D. strain, 2 Lactobacillus P. strains, 6 Brettanomyces bruxellensis strains (wild yeast), 1 Brettanomyces anomalus strain, and a sour dough culture made up of some saccharomyces and an unidentified Lactobacillus strain. So we're talking almost 20 strains of yeast and bacteria in 1 blend. This will be going into a barrel-aged sour golden ale.

 

So, yeah, blend away!
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are also some commercial yeast that you can purchase that is already a blend.  I use a couple from White Labs myself.  WLP080 is their Cream Ale yeast which is suppose to be a blend of Lager and Ale yeast.  Also, WLP060 is their American Ale blend which is a blend of several American Ale yeast.  Both of these yeast perform well and I really like the WLP060, it seems to perform a little better than WYeast 1056 which was my go to American Ale yeast in the past.  I still use it for some recipes that I have had good results with but I use the WLP060 on any new American Ale recipes that I try.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Josh. I may have been an impatient newbie. I pitched US05. That usually produces a vigorous Krausen, but nearly three days later, there was not much bubbling going on. I got worried that it was heat damaged in shipping. I pitched half of a pack of Mr. Beer yeast and it just took off. Looks great now, but I imagined different strains of yeast in there having a turf battle. Then I thought that RickBeer would give me some kind of citation for crimes against bacteria.!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

If you are a brewer that likes experimenting with yeasts, this forum thread is a long saga but I found it fascinating. In the search to find the yeasts in a beloved beer, the thread goes through microbiological analysis and brew testing, and exploration of how yeast is used in industry. Grab yourself a pint. It is a long read.

 

This thread question on mixing yeasts is discussed also in this thread and surfaces in their analysis.

 

https://www.homebrewtalk.com/forum/threads/isolated-yeast-tree-house-how-to-identify-and-characterize.623221/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×