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ge964a

Bottles Overflowing

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I’ve been having this problem after I’ve bottled my beer.  Some of the bottles overflow after a week or so.  The remains of the bottle taste fine, so I know that they are not spoiled.  I am careful not to put too much sugar in.  I was thinking that the problem was that my basement does not get much above 60 degrees, so maybe they were still fermenting.  I kept my last batch in the keg for 4 weeks before bottling, but the same thing happened.  Any ideas to help me keep more of my beer?

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1 hour ago, ge964a said:

I’ve been having this problem after I’ve bottled my beer.  Some of the bottles overflow after a week or so.  The remains of the bottle taste fine, so I know that they are not spoiled.  I am careful not to put too much sugar in.  I was thinking that the problem was that my basement does not get much above 60 degrees, so maybe they were still fermenting.  I kept my last batch in the keg for 4 weeks before bottling, but the same thing happened.  Any ideas to help me keep more of my beer?

How much sugar are you adding? What size bottle?

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Are you using the plastic MB bottles? I find that I occasionally have the same, and

I am positive that I did not add too much priming sugar. Always seems to happen with "dark" beers too. My best guess is that the bottle, suddenly "vents" when the pressure builds. The sudden release of pressure causes the CO2 to come out of solution (as the bottles are not cold) which causes the bottle to vent even more. The result is the bottle loses 1/3 or more of the beer as it vents. Why dark beers? Perhaps as mentioned, there are residual sugars, even after three weeks of fermentation. However the other beers of the same batch are not overly carbed and it seems odd that just one would have residual sugar and not the others. My feeling is that some bottles deform a tiny bit at the neck (not enough to notice by eye) which breaks the seal at the cap, and whoosh. That is one reason that I mostly bottle in glass now. 

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since my last plastic epic bottle failure (read Apollo rocket launch) i inspect the bottles and caps multiple times during the carb process. this time i noticed on day 2, bubbles forming on top of the beer. (clear bottles make this easy).  this told me co2 was escaping. i rechecked the top of the cap where it is fused to the riser of plastic and there it was...  a very thin seam forming a hairline break.

 

there has been on multiple forums, people having problems with bottle bombs. the only common thread was that they all involved a dark english grain...cant remember which. uk chocolate? it was thought that multiple batches of grain may have been harvested wet? or exposed to a contaminant or bug?  if you arent over carbing, and you are sure fermentation is done at bottling, all that is left is bottle failure or a bug... 

 

if i could i would get a mess of corny kegs and just use a co2 tank to pressurize the beer. too costly and too much work for me atm.

 

 

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Thanks, everyone.  I've been using MB bottles - and some similar ones from Bitter Lemon bottles - and am very careful with the sugar (I even have a MB sugar measure).  And yes, I almost always brew dark beers.  It probably is the that the bottles/caps are forming cracks.  I've thought about glass, but I was worried that they would shatter and send out shrapnel.  That used to happen to my grandfather when he bottled his own Root Beer many years ago.   

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Cut the tamper resistant plastic ring off the bottles. After the bottles have been used several times the cap will come in contact with the tamper resistant plastic ring causing a improper seal. I have had no issues since getting rid of the rings.

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Definitely remove those rings.

 

There's a difference between a Tablespoon & Teaspoon.

There's also a difference between a level Teaspoon vs a rounded Teaspoon.

Proper way to measure is to run a knife over Teaspoon to scrape off excess.

 

As a test use less sugar (1 Teaspoon, 1 1/2 Teaspoon, 1 3/4 Teaspoon) in a few bottles and label them (painters tape ?)

so they don't get mixed up.

 

My seemingly crazy/random thoughts anyway.

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I use sugar dots/Mr B carb pills. These are premeasured. 

I still get gusher sometimes with dark beers especially even after 3 weeks in LBK,   even using dots. So I have had to add less.

If I see bubbles in the bottle while carbing  agree - there is a leak, so I change the cap to a new one and add another sugar dot.

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