Jump to content
Mr.Beer Community
Sign in to follow this  
Bigjak

New guy

Recommended Posts

I acquired a Mr Beer kit and followed the instructions so far, my question is the instructions say to leave brew in the 8 gallon keg for 7 days then bottle, I read somewhere else up to 3 weeks before bottling, I’m confused

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

welcome aboard! they make an 8 gallon keg??? oh! the 7.9g fast ferment conical thing!

 

 

try to keep the temperature around your keg as close to 64f as you can for most ales. if your house gets hot, the fermenter temps will go up and the yeast might make apple cider flavors.

 

lots of good info on these forums.. a good place to start is with the sticky posts in rickbeer's signature block.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On Friday, July 20, 2018 at 2:55 PM, Bigjak said:

I acquired a Mr Beer kit and followed the instructions so far, my question is the instructions say to leave brew in the 8 gallon keg for 7 days then bottle, I read somewhere else up to 3 weeks before bottling, I’m confused

Welcome to our shared addiction and happy to know you found this forum. You've discovered the age old conflict between marketing and reality. For most contributors on these forums, the first batch wasn't the greatest, but it was beer; beer they had made. After that first batch they began the quest to learn how to improve their second batch. For some, we got lucky but couldn't repeat the results. As suggested above, seek out RickBeer's posts. Rick's posts summarize the knowledge of many who have gone before us.

You will discover temperature control is vitally important for all brewers. Yeasts have specific temperature ranges they love, ranges they'll tolerate and ranges they really don't like. When in doubt, for best results, hold your temperatures as close to the low end of the recommended temperature range. Yeast doing their thing during fermentation generate heat. When the temperature strays outside the recommended range, the yeast will produce compounds which you may not like or do not fit the style of beer.      

Patience and perseverance. If your first batch doesn't please you as much as you had hoped, set the bottles aside and wait. Often, the yeast will devour the off flavor compounds created during that first week of fermentation. Don't allow disappointment discourage you. Humans have brewed beers for nearly 10,000 years. In other words, it ain't rocket science, but it does require knowledge to repeatedly brew tasty brews. Appreciate the processes required to brew those beers you love. Homebrewing can be a very enjoyable hobby or disappointing and discouraging work. Ask questions and you'll be surprised by the help received. As a community we look forward to your contributions to these forums.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome! As others have pointed out, we currently recommend 3 weeks in the fermenter for best results. 

 

16 hours ago, D Kristof said:

You've discovered the age old conflict between marketing and reality.

 

Not quite accurate, I'm afraid. As many here will be able to verify, 7-10 days in the primary fermenter was conventional brewing wisdom for a long time. This is an issue of outdated instructions, rather than shady salesmanship. You'll note our newer kits have 3 weeks in big bold letters on the outside of the box. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, MRB Tim said:

Welrecommendation have pointed out, we currently recommend 3 weeks in the fermenter for best results. 

 

 

Not quite accurate, I'm afraid. As many here will be able to verify, 7-10 days in the primary fermenter was conventional brewing wisdom for a long time. This is an issue of outdated instructions, rather than shady salesmanship. You'll note our newer kits have 3 weeks in big bold letters on the outside of the box. 

@MRB Tim, not my intention to imply shady salesmanship, but thank you for bringing that misunderstanding to my attention. How long has the conical fastferm been offered with the old "rule of thumb" recommendations?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tim - a question for you. How long do the "Big Name" brewers let their "typical" middle of the road (so to speak) ales ferment for? This might be an impossible question to answer, but any guess? My feeling is that is less than 20 days, and closer to 14. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Brian N. said:

Tim - a question for you. How long do the "Big Name" brewers let their "typical" middle of the road (so to speak) ales ferment for? This might be an impossible question to answer, but any guess? My feeling is that is less than 20 days, and closer to 14. 

 

Actually, they can usually have these beers out of primary in 7-10 days. They have pressurized, temperature-controlled systems that can promote a full fermentation without off-flavors so it's a lot easier for them to ferment a large amount of batches in shorter periods of time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, MRB Josh R said:

 

Actually, they can usually have these beers out of primary in 7-10 days. They have pressurized, temperature-controlled systems that can promote a full fermentation without off-flavors so it's a lot easier for them to ferment a large amount of batches in shorter periods of time.

My last lager was temp controlled for the first week at 5 PSI then i let the temps go where they wanted and turned the PSI up to 10. After two weeks i kegged it. Its been sitting in a keg for three weeks and it pours crystal clear with no yeast esters detectable by my senses. Im very happy with fermenting under pressure 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I notice now the Cooper's DIY beer do not state fermentation time in their recipes now or sometimes FG.

They do indicate you need SG stability (using hydrometer) over 24 hours before bottling. 

You might likely get there before 3 weeks, but 3 weeks is fairly safe and I find it easy to schedule and plan the brewing process that way.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i like the 3 weeks time guideline because it gives the yeast a chance to clean house. on the last week i move the fermenter to someplace around 70f to encourage the yeast to stay busy. it also gives any crud that washed into the beer from the side walls a chance to settle out...usually.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×