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robo1

I screwed up Bindlestick Hoppy Wheat...what did I do?

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Hey all,

 

I'm not a total noob anymore, but still pretty new.  I made the Bindlestick Hoppy Wheat exactly as the recipe said (followed it exactly).  I finally got it bottle conditioned and ready to go, and it was so bad.  It is so unbelievably bitter and hoppy that you can't stomach a whole beer.  It is spit take worthy when you take the first drink. 

 

What on earth could have happened to have this be the result of the brew?  I really want to learn what I did wrong, because EEK...

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6 minutes ago, MRB Josh R said:

Did you let it age at room temps for 2 weeks after it was carbonated?

 

 

Oh yes. Its been about 5 weeks now, and it still tastes the same. 

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Sounds like it may have an infection. Can you describe the flavor better? Hops do not get more bitter over time, they do the complete opposite. This beer is only 38 IBUs and shouldn't be bitter at all unless you have some sort of infection.

 

Also, some people simply perceive bitterness more than others so it could just be your taste buds, too.

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15 hours ago, MRB Josh R said:

Sounds like it may have an infection. Can you describe the flavor better? Hops do not get more bitter over time, they do the complete opposite. This beer is only 38 IBUs and shouldn't be bitter at all unless you have some sort of infection.

 

Also, some people simply perceive bitterness more than others so it could just be your taste buds, too.

 

I was worried about it being infected, but I've never had a brew get infected before so I wasn't sure what to look for other than bottle bombs (which didn't happen). 

 

The flavor tastes like it is 100 IBU's.  It tastes just like you pick up a handful of bittering hops and started chewing on them.  That's the only way I know how to describe it.  Remember the Keystone Light bitter beer face commercials?  That's what your face does when you taste it. 

 

The only concern I had while brewing was that maybe the temp wasn't low enough during fermentation, as it was before I had really gotten my temperature regulation method panned out. However, I'm unsure if this would be the result of a fermenting temperature issue.

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8 hours ago, epete28 said:

I have this recipe waiting to be brewed. It may be my next batch. I'm excited about it so I hate to hear you've ended up with a bad result.

 

Well, carry on and brew a delicious beer.  I can assure you that this is totally my fault, I just wanted to pinpoint exactly what went wrong.

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15 hours ago, MRB Josh R said:

Sounds like it may have an infection. Can you describe the flavor better? Hops do not get more bitter over time, they do the complete opposite. This beer is only 38 IBUs and shouldn't be bitter at all unless you have some sort of infection.

 

Also, some people simply perceive bitterness more than others so it could just be your taste buds, too.

 

Oh, I forgot the last part.  I absolutely love hops (when done properly) and drink mostly IPA's.  I don't think it's a taste bud issue, but just my opinion.

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1 hour ago, robo1 said:

 

Oh, I forgot the last part.  I absolutely love hops (when done properly) and drink mostly IPA's.  I don't think it's a taste bud issue, but just my opinion.

Have you had other people taste it and see what they think?

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35 minutes ago, gophers6 said:

Have you had other people taste it and see what they think?

 

Against my better judgement, yes.  They felt the same way I did.

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I made this recipe too and I found that it was more bitter than expected. But it was also riddled with acetaldehyde. So maybe if you fermented too warm & the combo of hops turned up the bitterness idk. I think that's what happened to me. I definitely wanna try this recipe again tho.

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Not sure what could have caused the extra bitterness unless you added too much hops for the 10 minute boil, or you boiled too long. I double checked the numbers on this recipe and confirmed that it is only 38 IBUs. When we brewed it here, it wasn't bitter at all.

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UPDATE:

 

On this beer (and my others), I've just never been able to get them right.  They all had either just off flavors or were very acidic.  I have been really thinking about my process, and what I could possibly have been doing wrong, and I think I figured it out, and it proves that I'm a total noob. 

 

I think that I have been pitching my yeast (every time) when the wort was too damn hot.  I know I have been.  I really really hope that this is what is causing my beers to suck, because I was about to give up.  BTW, It was never hot enough to kill the yeast, because fermenting always happened.

 

I have an oatmeal stout fermenting right now that I brought the wort down to 70 degrees before I pitched (first thing I made since I had my realization).  Only time will tell if I am right.   I really hope I'm right, or I may just have to stop trying.  Too many bad batches.

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4 minutes ago, robo1 said:

UPDATE:

 

On this beer (and my others), I've just never been able to get them right.  They all had either just off flavors or were very acidic.  I have been really thinking about my process, and what I could possibly have been doing wrong, and I think I figured it out, and it proves that I'm a total noob. 

 

I think that I have been pitching my yeast (every time) when the wort was too damn hot.  I know I have been.  I really really hope that this is what is causing my beers to suck, because I was about to give up.  BTW, It was never hot enough to kill the yeast, because fermenting always happened.

 

I have an oatmeal stout fermenting right now that I brought the wort down to 70 degrees before I pitched (first thing I made since I had my realization).  Only time will tell if I am right.   I really hope I'm right, or I may just have to stop trying.  Too many bad batches.

Stressing yeast can cause them to produce off flavors. I always try to pitch under the max temp range of the yeast. Ideally the yeast should be slightly cooler than the wort temp.

Since I use US-05 a lot I'll typically have my yeast at room temp 72-73 in summer and pitch my yeast typically in 74-77 temp range before putting it in the mini fridge.

That Oatmeal Stout should be fine.

I've had a couple occasions where I had to chill the wort overnight and pitch the next morning and the beer turned out fine.

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1 hour ago, Cato said:

Stressing yeast can cause them to produce off flavors. I always try to pitch under the max temp range of the yeast. Ideally the yeast should be slightly cooler than the wort temp.

Since I use US-05 a lot I'll typically have my yeast at room temp 72-73 in summer and pitch my yeast typically in 74-77 temp range before putting it in the mini fridge.

That Oatmeal Stout should be fine.

I've had a couple occasions where I had to chill the wort overnight and pitch the next morning and the beer turned out fine.

 

I have sometimes done that too to pitch cool. But on the other hand sometimes I follow other suggestions which say = if it below 90 you can pitch and then cool it. Their idea being better to have the yeast in eating the fermentables than risk infection.  I do not have a good correlation recorded between results and actions.

 

I think Fermentis has changed its instructions though since I last looked. I could swear they had listed 90 deg max for making a starter.

Current instructions 

➢ Direct Pitching Pitch the yeast directly in the fermentation vessel on the surface of the wort at or above the fermentation temperature. Progressively sprinkle the dry yeast into the wort ensuring the yeast covers all the surface of wort available to avoid clumps. Ideally, the yeast will be added during the first part of the filling of the vessel; in which case hydration can be done at wort temperature higher than fermentation temperature, the fermenter being then filled with wort at lower temperature to bring the entire wort temperature at fermentation temperature. 
 
➢ With prior rehydration Alternatively, sprinkle the yeast in minimum 10 times its weight of sterile water or boiled and hopped wort at 25 to 29°C (77°F to 84°F). Leave to rest 15 to 30 minutes, gently stir and pitch the resultant cream into the fermentation vessel. 
 

 

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