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Hazy IPA dry-hopping tips?

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2 hours ago, Shrike said:

 

 

Like Cato said, use the whole packet.  There's no reason to throw away perfectly viable yeast.  Put them to work belching CO2 and pissing Ethyl Alcohol!  😀

 

Well, how I can I not give a big  'Like'  to that?! lo l 😀

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43 minutes ago, MRB Tim said:

 

I do it this way. Yeast is usually pretty cheap. Every now and again I'll bring some home to try throwing it in a sourdough starter and see what it does, but usually I don't bother. 

 

Have you ever just pitched the remaining yeast into the fermenter a few days after you started a new batch?  I'm wondering if it's ever done because I was thinking about doing just that - pitching in the rest of the packet into the 3-day old wort.  Go or No Go?

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13 hours ago, Mic Todd said:

 

Which does bring up a question (if I can be serious for a moment).  Can one open the keg top (briefly!) a few days after the first pitch and pitch some more?  Ie, pitch the rest of the packet.  I ask because there is just a small part of me wondering if I pitched enough yeast since I didn't have a scale to weigh the packet before I pitched and only guessed on how much of the 11g's  I pitched.  I mean, some do open the lid to add hops before the fermentation is complete, why not more yeast?

If you have fermentation after a couple of days, you pitched enough yeast.  Adding more will not help.

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15 hours ago, Mic Todd said:

 

I am a new brewer and I am trying to save 1/2 of my 11g dry packet of Safale US-05 by doing just about what you mentioned, sans the ziplock.  I will try to use the remaining yeast on my next batch in a few weeks.  After reading your post (and others) I think I will avoid purchasing liquid yeasts if they come in a quantity to do 5 or more gallons.  It'd be a shame to just throw away the bottom half because it's not very 'save-able'. 

 

Liquid yeast unlike dry yeast does not have the same amount of viable yeast cells when you buy it as it did when packaged. 

 

Dry yeast (US-05) for example is understood to have roughly 200 billion active yeast cells per 11g packet.  Unless past expiration or handled incorrectly it should still be fairly close to that number when you buy it.

 

Liquid yeast on the other hand is understood to have 100 billion active yeast cells at packaging.  Because it degrades at a certain percentage daily until the expiration (4 to 6 months), there are less than that number when you buy it.  So even though most of my batches are 2.5 to 3 gallons in size and 1.050 or so in gravity, I usually need to make a starter with liquid yeast because there are not enough viable yeast cells there for proper fermentation.  I know the package says that there is enough there for 5 gallons but if you use a pitch rate calculator you will find that you are almost always short. 

 

In homebrewing it is nearly impossible to overpitch your yeast.  So the risk of contamination by saving a packet for later or the risk of yeast not being viable after doing this is too great for me to risk it.  

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1 hour ago, BDawg62 said:

If you have fermentation after a couple of days, you pitched enough yeast.  Adding more will not help.

This is not fully accurate. If there is still sugars to be eaten, then yes pitching more yeast CAN help with that.  The question needing to be asked is “why” more needs pitched?  Was it too hot during fermentation and you killed off your yeasties too soon?  Did you pitch old yeast and while you had signs of fermentation, they couldn’t complete the job?  Are you just a mad scientist that wants to get the hydro reading down to 1.000 or even below?   You need to know why you are doing it because often the kind of yeast you used originally might not be good enough for a 2nd dose.  It has been a while, but I’ve had to repitch a few times over the years. This only happened to me when using dry yeast though and before I started to calculate exactly how much was needed and had been just eyeballing it based on SG.  

 

A buddy of mine made a 20% abv “beer” that I called “Squints” because that is what it made me do when I tried it, and he had to repitch a few times... including using champagne yeast, which is tolerant to higher abv levels than most beer yeast. 

 

Me trying the aptly named “Squints”.  - May 2016. 

425BDF40-B238-4FFD-B604-49C6064B3CDB.thumb.jpeg.50541f17c76c336487366234c6460230.jpeg

 

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2 hours ago, BDawg62 said:

In homebrewing it is nearly impossible to overpitch your yeast.  So the risk of contamination by saving a packet for later or the risk of yeast not being viable after doing this is too great for me to risk it.  

 

So, based on this assessment, saving half a pack of dry yeast (in this case 11g Safale US-05) is riskier than the potential gain.  Either use the packet up or don't buy the 11g packets in the first place? 

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2 hours ago, kedogn said:

Are you just a mad scientist that wants to get the hydro reading down to 1.000 or even below?   You need to know why you are doing it because often the kind of yeast you used originally might not be good enough for a 2nd dose.  It has been a while, but I’ve had to repitch a few times over the years. This only happened to me when using dry yeast though and before I started to calculate exactly how much was needed and had been just eyeballing it based on SG. 

Two points, Kedogn:   First, I asked about this because I have a half packet of the Safale yeast left over, having only pitched half initially (entirely by guess - I don't yet know how to calculate how much I need and only went with the package's statement that it was enough yeast for 5 gallons and I was brewing 2.)  And second, because I AM a 'Wanna-be' Mad Scientific Brewer at heart and am not opposed to the risk of entirely screwing up a batch of fermented beer for experimentation.

 

This experiment involved adding one full pound of DME and one cup of agave nectar to the original MRB can of mix (no booster packs).  Therefore, I reasoned that more yeast might be warranted (given the extra sugars added).  I was a bit worried I may not have added enough initially and if I can't profitably store the remaining packet, why not use the rest now?  That's all -

mad scientist.jpeg

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32 minutes ago, Mic Todd said:

 

So, based on this assessment, saving half a pack of dry yeast (in this case 11g Safale US-05) is riskier than the potential gain.  Either use the packet up or don't buy the 11g packets in the first place? 

Just throwing this out there... I buy a 500g brick of US-05, use what we need and zip lock it shut and back into the fridge it goes until next time. No issues so far.  #KnockOnWood 

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16 minutes ago, Mic Todd said:

why not use the rest now

Yeah, I would. However, with dry yeast I would get it alive and active first.  It’s as easy as a cup of warm water, 2 tbsp of regular sugar and your yeast.  Let it do it’s thing and come alive and then pitch the whole thing. 

 

Btw, yes, I would boil the water first and then cool it before adding sugar/yeast. Also, sanitize the container for the water. :) 

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1 minute ago, kedogn said:

Just throwing this out there... I buy a 500g brick of US-05, use what we need and zip lock it shut until next time. No issues so far.  #KnockOnWood 

 

Wow, 500 GRAMS?  lol, that makes my 11g look like peanuts.  Well, after using ~1/2  I just folded the packet tightly, clamped it with a small kitchen clamp and placed it in the fridge.  I hope that keeps it fresh and contaminate free.

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4 minutes ago, Mic Todd said:

Wow, 500 GRAMS?  lol, that makes my 11g look like peanuts

I also do 35 gallon batches as well, so, it’s relative.  When we make that next jump, up to 10 bbl batches, we’ll use a full 500g brick at a time. Again, all relative. :) 

 

I would also put the yeast in a ziplock bag. A cheap piece of mind. :) 

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2 minutes ago, kedogn said:

I also do 35 gallon batches as well, so, it’s relative.  When we make that next jump, up to 10 bbl batches, we’ll use a full 500g brick at a time. Again, all relative. :) 

 

One of our favorite in-state craft brewers (Bend, OR) is '10 Barrel Brewing'.  (Apocalypse IPA, etc).   When you go to 10 bbl K, you'll have good competition!

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23 minutes ago, kedogn said:

Just throwing this out there... I buy a 500g brick of US-05, use what we need and zip lock it shut and back into the fridge it goes until next time. No issues so far.  #KnockOnWood 

Kedogn,

 

You are a professional brewer with many more batches under your belt than most on this forum.  You also aren't brewing in your kitchen or other area that isn't exclusively used to brew beer.  The risk for you is lower than what it is for a typical homebrewer. 

 

The statement regarding "pitch it all it is not worth the risk" is mainly for the typical homebrew scale with a packet of $4 to $8 yeast depending on dry or liquid.  Saving a couple of bucks doesn't make sense when you are potentially risking an entire batch.

 

Dawg

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25 minutes ago, Mic Todd said:

 

Wow, 500 GRAMS?  lol, that makes my 11g look like peanuts.  Well, after using ~1/2  I just folded the packet tightly, clamped it with a small kitchen clamp and placed it in the fridge.  I hope that keeps it fresh and contaminate free.

 

Lots of folks do that with the dry yeasts.  Liquid?  Pitch it all.  Dry?  Use half a packet if you want (I pitch the whole packet).  But as Kedogn says, a ziploc bag will help preserve the remaining 1/2.

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5 minutes ago, BDawg62 said:

The risk for you is lower than what it is for a typical homebrewer. 

I’m sorry, huh?!  I brew in a garage. At this point I am basically a Homebrewer on some serious steroids.  I don’t have a fancy closed circuit system (yet).  The biggest difference is, other than batch size, is that if the typical home brewer loses a batch it’s a bummer.  If I lose a batch, it hurts my bottom line big at this stage. So to say the risk for me is lower... well.... sorry, I couldn’t disagree with that comment anymore than I currently do. :) 

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I sanitize the packet of dry yeast (if it's waterproof as many are).  I then put it on a sanitized plate that has dried.  I then open it with dry sanitized scissors, and pour 1/2 of the contents onto a coffee filter on my scale (that's how you know it's half...).  I then fold the top several times with my sanitized hands, and place a piece of scotch tape to hold it closed.  I then place the yeast in a ziplock that I wiped out with a sanitized paper towel and let dry.

 

I would not throw an opened yeast packet in the frig, clipped shut or not, and then simply use it.  

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10 minutes ago, RickBeer said:

I sanitize the packet of dry yeast (if it's waterproof as many are).  I then put it on a sanitized plate that has dried.  I then open it with dry sanitized scissors, and pour 1/2 of the contents onto a coffee filter on my scale (that's how you know it's half...).  I then fold the top several times with my sanitized hands, and place a piece of scotch tape to hold it closed.  I then place the yeast in a ziplock that I wiped out with a sanitized paper towel and let dry.

 

I would not throw an opened yeast packet in the frig, clipped shut or not, and then simply use it.  

 

Well, then perhaps I ought to consider this remaining half packet contaminated and forget about it.  It's not as if it will be a big loss $-wise.  I'll know better next time how to safely store it.  Thanks -  still, I hope I added enough to the batch, I should have just gone ahead and pitched it all since I was only guessing on how much went out of the packet.

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For what it's worth, my wife kept a yeast starter (in the fridge) for years and years (for her sourdough bread) in a plain Ball glass jar, capped with a standard lid - NO STERILIZATION what-so-ever.  I'm not saying I don't think sterilization is important but in the sourdough yeast, that same starter probably saw two (if not 3) different refrigerators lifetimes and continued to make sourdough her neighbors were envious of.  Yeast is pretty tough stuff and will be around on this planet well after real Mad Scientists have blown us all to smithereens at last.

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54 minutes ago, kedogn said:

The biggest difference is, other than batch size, is that if the typical home brewer loses a batch it’s a bummer.  If I lose a batch, it hurts my bottom line big at this stage. So to say the risk for me is lower... well.... sorry, I couldn’t disagree with that comment anymore than I currently do. :) 

 

Yeah, I'd say your risk here is much, much higher than someone like me risking a single 2-gallon batch.  It's one reason why I like this small system so much.  A guy almost never has more than $20-40 bucks involved here and that won't even by two people a good dinner in most decent restaurants anymore.  Kudos to Mr Beer and their 2 gallon system, for learning the basics of home brewing...😎

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55 minutes ago, Mic Todd said:

 

Well, then perhaps I ought to consider this remaining half packet contaminated and forget about it.  It's not as if it will be a big loss $-wise.  I'll know better next time how to safely store it.  Thanks -  still, I hope I added enough to the batch, I should have just gone ahead and pitched it all since I was only guessing on how much went out of the packet.

 

You can still get some use out of it.  Next batch you brew, throw the yeast in with the water that you boil. You'll have billions of little yeast corpses in the water to serve as nutrient for the yeast you'll be pitching.

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18 minutes ago, Shrike said:

 

You can still get some use out of it.  Next batch you brew, throw the yeast in with the water that you boil. You'll have billions of little yeast corpses in the water to serve as nutrient for the yeast you'll be pitching.

 

Yeastie Zombies.  You guys are amazing....😜

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5 hours ago, Mic Todd said:

 

One of our favorite in-state craft brewers (Bend, OR) is '10 Barrel Brewing'.  (Apocalypse IPA, etc).   When you go to 10 bbl K, you'll have good competition!

 

Not to offend anyone, but I don't consider 10 Barrel a "craft brewery" because they are owned by AB Inbev and are not eligible for the "Craft Brewed" label from the American Brewers Association. I also wouldn't consider that good competition. They already "lost" when they sold out to ABI.

 

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34 minutes ago, JoshR said:

 

Not to offend anyone, but I don't consider 10 Barrel a "craft brewery" because they are owned by AB Inbev and are not eligible for the "Craft Brewed" label from the American Brewers Association. I also wouldn't consider that good competition. They already "lost" when they sold out to ABI.

 

#WhatHeSaid!  :) 

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1 hour ago, JoshR said:

 

Not to offend anyone, but I don't consider 10 Barrel a "craft brewery" because they are owned by AB Inbev and are not eligible for the "Craft Brewed" label from the American Brewers Association. I also wouldn't consider that good competition. They already "lost" when they sold out to ABI.

 

Oy, same thing happened to Devil's Backbone Brewery here in Virginia.

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