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oldbagobones

Cold crashing and bottle carbonating

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Hi gang, I have recently cold crashed two LBK's with two different types of beer.  My question is that previously I had not cold crashed an LBK and the end result was a good carbonated beer in the bottles.  I recently tried one of the bottles that was cold crashed after five weeks conditioning and it seemed to lack the carbonation of the un-cold crashed one.  Is the absence of the yeast in the cold crashed ones causing  a lack of carbonation or did I need to compensate with an additional amount of priming sugar for the bottles?  I may not have let the conditioning take as long as I should have but it seems there was a significantly less than the non cold crashed LBK.  Thoughts?

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19 minutes ago, oldbagobones said:

Hi gang, I have recently cold crashed two LBK's with two different types of beer.  My question is that previously I had not cold crashed an LBK and the end result was a good carbonated beer in the bottles.  I recently tried one of the bottles that was cold crashed after five weeks conditioning and it seemed to lack the carbonation of the un-cold crashed one.  Is the absence of the yeast in the cold crashed ones causing  a lack of carbonation or did I need to compensate with an additional amount of priming sugar for the bottles?  I may not have let the conditioning take as long as I should have but it seems there was a significantly less than the non cold crashed LBK.  Thoughts?

There will almost always be plenty of yeast in your beer to carbonate even after cold crashing.

 

either your beer simply does not want to carbonate or you did something wrong. Ive had both happen to me. I assume you followed the carb for 3 weeks around 70 degrees and then refrigerate for 3 days before drinking? Its gotten colder here by me. 5-10 degrees can make a huge difference 

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The temp has been a fairly constant 72 degrees.  The bottles have been conditioning for over 4 weeks.  I just tried one bottle that was 3/4 full at the end of the last bit of wort.  It may be that the bottle did not contain enough primer or simply not enough in the bottle.  My concern is the cold crash affecting the outcome. Creeps you say no, so hopefully my other batches will be OK.

 

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3 minutes ago, oldbagobones said:

The temp has been a fairly constant 72 degrees.  The bottles have been conditioning for over 4 weeks.  I just tried one bottle that was 3/4 full at the end of the last bit of wort.  It may be that the bottle did not contain enough primer or simply not enough in the bottle.  My concern is the cold crash affecting the outcome. Creeps you say no, so hopefully my other batches will be OK.

 

I’ve lagered beers for a month and a half and still had enough yeast to carb my bottles. So yes, you’ll be ok.

 

I had had a batch one time that took months to carb. Not sure why. But then all of a sudden one day, they were carbed. It’s never happened before, and it’s never happened again. However, I am a firm believer that brewing is a science and any attribute in my beer is there because of something I did in the process. 

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On October 17, 2018 at 11:30 AM, Creeps McLane said:

I’ve lagered beers for a month and a half and still had enough yeast to carb my bottles. So yes, you’ll be ok.

 

I had had a batch one time that took months to carb. Not sure why. But then all of a sudden one day, they were carbed. It’s never happened before, and it’s never happened again. However, I am a firm believer that brewing is a science and any attribute in my beer is there because of something I did in the process. 

I tend to attribute it to magic on most occasions. Definitely magic. How could science be the sole reason beer tastes so majestic?

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1 hour ago, Big Sarge said:

I tend to attribute it to magic on most occasions. Definitely magic. How could science be the sole reason beer tastes so majestic?

 

It's much more romantic to think of it that way.  Maybe I should change my dream of being a 'Mad Scientific Brewer' wanna-be to a 'Mad Magician Brewer' wanna-be;  a little esotericism to help the yeastie beasies do their magic.  👿

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On 10/17/2018 at 9:55 AM, oldbagobones said:

Hi gang, I have recently cold crashed two LBK's with two different types of beer.  My question is that previously I had not cold crashed an LBK and the end result was a good carbonated beer in the bottles.  I recently tried one of the bottles that was cold crashed after five weeks conditioning and it seemed to lack the carbonation of the un-cold crashed one.  Is the absence of the yeast in the cold crashed ones causing  a lack of carbonation or did I need to compensate with an additional amount of priming sugar for the bottles?  I may not have let the conditioning take as long as I should have but it seems there was a significantly less than the non cold crashed LBK.  Thoughts?

ive been brewing for less than 1 yr, but i cold crash every batch. not for beer clarity, but for compacting the trub so I get more yield  (beer in bottles). I bottle in 12 oz glass with 1/2 tsp of sugar and I condition/carb for at least 4 weeks at 70+ deg. I have never had an undercarbed beer. Using PET bottles, I have experienced that. I blame faulty caps, didn't screw them on tightly enough, i'm an idiot....one of those reasons. i find that the bottle caps make a tighter seal. at least for me, but what do i know. i just love beer.

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