Jump to content
Mr.Beer Community
Squirley Mic

New (essential?) Equipment

Recommended Posts

22 minutes ago, Mic Todd said:

 

No wonder you know so much about this business.  I, on the other hand, know almost nothing, as Rick has so often made a strong point of.  Is your brewery in my state (Oregon)?   Because, if it is, I'd certainly like to patronize it and meet you sometime.

We are currently only doing wholesale distribution. We are based in Issaquah, WA (for now) and have 6 accounts from North Seattle to North Bend down to Kent.  We do the House Beer at a place called Brewmaster’s Taproom in Renton and might be doing the same for a different location (different beer) fairly soon. We are in the process of scouting for a location for a full brewery/taproom.  If all goes even close to right, we should be open by 10/15/19. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, kedogn said:

Buy local, drink local!

 

Its still a hang up for me, and I fail occasionally, but I do avoid some companies entirely.  With Elysian being local, that’s tough (man I miss Space Dust), but luckily we have plenty of local, non sell out, true craft breweries to chose from around here, so that’s nice. 

elysian space dust is a great beer, and I will still buy it. it's also possible for a company to thrive even after "selling out" to a large company. That's what Warren Buffet does. He buys great businesses and let's them continue to do the things that made them great. I understand the negatives of selling out, but it doesn't necessarily ruin the product going forward. I support my local HBS and local craft breweries in my area, Shannon, Revolver, Rahr, Community....etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Mic Todd said:

It also sounds like everything I've tried to do, to this point, has drawn criticism from the forum.  My use of adjuncts to experiment with, my use of a refractor instead of a hydrometer (tho I own both) my decision to use brown sugar, (even tho MRB uses brown sugar in many of their recipes, themselves), my decision to cold crash for 24 hours (I ended up doing 72 hrs) and my decision to experiment in the first place after only my 3rd batch brewed.  And my decision to try dry-hopping in the bottle with a self-brewed hop tea.

 

You guys are a tough bunch on beginners like myself!  LOL

Don't worry about it. Its your beer and you can do what you want and put anything you want in there. After all you've always got store bought beer in case your experiment didn't work out.

 

After all it is a hobby and so should be fun, so do it any way that it pleases you. Seriously, its your beer have fun with it.

 

For me I see learning the brewing craft is no different than learning how to cook really well, or play music, or build furniture. There's basics to learn, so you start out a bit simple, you learn your spices, your chords and scales, how to build a simple box or table,  or your grains, hops, adjuncts. Once you've tasted some success you get that feel of confidence and you can start choosing your own complimentary spices, playing in different keys, or brewing more complex recipes with a reasonable expectation of success and good drinkable beer in 2-3 months.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Mic Todd said:

 

!) I followed the instructions exactly on my 1st two batches.  So far, so good.  - CHECK

2) Gone all Mad Scientist?  I've tried one experiment (so far) by using a MRB mix and adding 2 adjuncts.  Hardly 'Mad Scientist'  - CHECK

3) Has no clue what results might be by adding X...  Do you really think I did that Rick?   I checked here with the forum, read on-line and asked friends that brew.  - CHECK

4) Doesn't have patience, organizational skills or time.  Nope, I am exercising great patience.  Most of my 1st batch is still conditioning in bottles 2.5 months after brewing.  CHECK

 

Brown sugar... no idea that the yeast will eat the sugar....?  Why do you think I was going to add it to the mix in the 1st place, to make my beer taste like candy?  I got the idea from reading about the affects of adding various types of fermentables to the wort - including Mr Beer's advice.  If it always makes beer taste like licorice, why does anyone ever add it? 

 

I think you must think me stupid and not someone trying to learn new things and try new things.  Good news is, you won't have to try my experiments - that's what the wife is for!

And I mean this with my tongue in my cheek.  I appreciate your advice and have followed almost all of it.  Drink more beer - Be Happy!  Cheers 😎

 

It doesn't make beer taste like licorice.  It adds subtle notes of it which in less robust beers can be unpleasant (more of a molasses flavor to me, but palates vary.  Flavors will also vary depending on the type of brown sugar used.  Dark brown sugar is much more assertive than light, for example).  Why would anyone add it to a brew?  Speaking only for myself, I add about 1/2 cup when making a coffee stout solely because to my taste it helps cut the bitterness of the coffee.  I don't use it in any other of my brews.  I've had it in other recipes and really don't care for the taste of it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, Jdub said:

I understand the negatives of selling out, but it doesn't necessarily ruin the product going forward.

I hope I haven’t made anyone think I refrain because their product isn’t good any more.  No, it’s still good, I’m sure, but I just try my best not to put my $ into their parent companies.  #DrinkLocal 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Cato said:

Don't worry about it. Its your beer and you can do what you want and put anything you want in there. After all you've always got store bought beer in case your experiment didn't work out.   After all it is a hobby and so should be fun, so do it any way that it pleases you. Seriously, its your beer have fun with it.

 

For me I see learning the brewing craft is no different than learning how to cook really well, or play music, or build furniture. There's basics to learn, so you start out a bit simple, you learn your spices, your chords and scales, how to build a simple box or table,  or your grains, hops, adjuncts. Once you've tasted some success you get that feel of confidence and you can start choosing your own complimentary spices, playing in different keys, or brewing more complex recipes with a reasonable expectation of success and good drinkable beer in 2-3 months.

 

Exactly, Cato.  Thanks -

I'm in this hobby now for beer and for fun...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Shrike said:

 

It doesn't make beer taste like licorice.  It adds subtle notes of it which in less robust beers can be unpleasant (more of a molasses flavor to me, but palates vary.  Flavors will also vary depending on the type of brown sugar used.  Dark brown sugar is much more assertive than light, for example).  Why would anyone add it to a brew?  Speaking only for myself, I add about 1/2 cup when making a coffee stout solely because to my taste it helps cut the bitterness of the coffee.  I don't use it in any other of my brews.  I've had it in other recipes and really don't care for the taste of it.

 

Well, I side-stepped the issue by going with agave instead.  Got a pretty good OG out of that and the DME.  Now, to see if I got the flavor I was after

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, kedogn said:

I hope I haven’t made anyone think I refrain because their product isn’t good any more.  No, it’s still good, I’m sure, but I just try my best not to put my $ into their parent companies.  #DrinkLocal 

no i hear you. always best to support small business when you can. you can't blame a business who probably started from scratch in their garage or something for taking the money during a buyout. that's the american dream. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Jdub said:

no i hear you. always best to support small business when you can. you can't blame a business who probably started from scratch in their garage or something for taking the money during a buyout. that's the american dream. 

Don’t get me wrong, I’ve said “If the check is as fat as I am or fatter” I’d take it too. :) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, kedogn said:

Don’t get me wrong, I’ve said “If the check is as fat as I am or fatter” I’d take it too. :) 

i can see the conversation now....."we'd like to offer you $100,000,000 for Manfish....." nah.....i'm good. just want to stay true to craft brewing. LOL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, Jdub said:

i can see the conversation now....."we'd like to offer you $100,000,000 for Manfish....." nah.....i'm good. just want to stay true to craft brewing. LOL

LOL!  Yeah, right!  You’d see this fat guy RUN for the first time in his life.... right to the bank!  Lol 😂 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Mic Todd said:

I suppose this would be my response to Rick about why so many fall out of the hobby:

 

I remember when I built my first skateboard.  did I go to the library (On-Line wasn't invented, yet) to read all about it before I just built one?  No.  I just built it.

When the skateboard wobbled badly, did I go to the library to find out why?  No, I figured out a better way to align and attach the wheels.

When the board warped badly, did I go to the library or ask the manufacturers of them why?  No, I figured out a way to make them by laminating different woods.

When the wheels wore out fast, did I......... No I went to the parks and watched others with better boards and found out what they were using.

When I tried making my boards of different sizes, shapes and styles, did I follow instructions of others?  No.  I just did it, going with what worked best.

 

And finally, when I could no longer make them fast enough to satisfy all my friends who wanted to buy them (they were the best on the block)  - I moved on to motorcycles and found a new hobby.  But that's just me, Rick.

All Rick was trying to explain was, in general, if I may use your skateboard analogy, too often after falling off multiple times the enthusiast got discouraged. When the boards warped instead of trying to improve them by laminating, the skateboard enthusiast quit. None of his comments were intended to be taken personally. Not everyone perseveres.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Shrike said:

 

It doesn't make beer taste like licorice.  It adds subtle notes of it which in less robust beers can be unpleasant (more of a molasses flavor to me, but palates vary.  Flavors will also vary depending on the type of brown sugar used.  Dark brown sugar is much more assertive than light, for example).  Why would anyone add it to a brew?  Speaking only for myself, I add about 1/2 cup when making a coffee stout solely because to my taste it helps cut the bitterness of the coffee.  I don't use it in any other of my brews.  I've had it in other recipes and really don't care for the taste of it.

I added it to early versions of my coffee stouts and porters. Now that they're approaching two years old the licorice flavor is IMO VERY pronounced. I like licorice but IMO those beers didn't age well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, D Kristof said:

I added it to early versions of my coffee stouts and porters. Now that they're approaching two years old the licorice flavor is IMO VERY pronounced. I like licorice but IMO those beers didn't age well.

 

I've only done it twice and neither batch lasted that long.  :)  I'm going to keep that in mind, though, for future batches, and probably omit the brown sugar.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Jdub said:

no i hear you. always best to support small business when you can. you can't blame a business who probably started from scratch in their garage or something for taking the money during a buyout. that's the american dream. 

 

Totally agree.  When you create something, and at some point have the ability to monetize your creation to that degree, who wouldn't sell out?

 

If you look at the list of breweries that sold, and you go back and research things their owners said at points prior to selling, you'll find at least one brewery (Wicked Weed) that was very vocal about breweries that sold out.  Very vocal.  Then they did.  I get why they sold, but they shouldn't be surprised at the criticism, or boycotting, they got afterwards given their outspoken opposition prior to selling.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Shrike said:

 

I've only done it twice and neither batch lasted that long.  :)  I'm going to keep that in mind, though, for future batches, and probably omit the brown sugar.

 

I see that MRB's 'That Voodoo That You Do' recipe calls for their Bewitched Amber Ale mix,  a pack of LME and 1 cup of brown sugar.  This was one of the first recipes that I wanted to try making.  I have a can of the BAA that I bought last month but have decided to put it to use making a pumpkin beer instead.  So, there's at least one recipe using brown sugar - have any of you here ever tried making this?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Mic Todd said:

 

I see that MRB's 'That Voodoo That You Do' recipe calls for their Bewitched Amber Ale mix,  a pack of LME and 1 cup of brown sugar.  This was one of the first recipes that I wanted to try making.  I have a can of the BAA that I bought last month but have decided to put it to use making a pumpkin beer instead.  So, there's at least one recipe using brown sugar - have any of you here ever tried making this?

 

I did not care for it at all.  It's pretty much the only BAA-based recipe I've made that I didn't like.

 

There are others that love it, though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, D Kristof said:

All Rick was trying to explain was, in general, if I may use your skateboard analogy, too often after falling off multiple times the enthusiast got discouraged. When the boards warped instead of trying to improve them by laminating, the skateboard enthusiast quit. None of his comments were intended to be taken personally. Not everyone perseveres.

 

I suppose this hobby is like others: many start, few stay interested long enough to get as good at it as most of you guys seem to be.  Pretty normal.  In my case, if all I did was brew beers like MRB's CAL, straight-up without experimenting, I'd probably get bored too - real quick.  But I think I'm in this hobby for a long time - I love craft beer and I love trying all kinds of different types

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Mic Todd said:

I suppose this would be my response to Rick about why so many fall out of the hobby:

 

I remember when I built my first skateboard.  did I go to the library (On-Line wasn't invented, yet) to read all about it before I just built one?  No.  I just built it.

When the skateboard wobbled badly, did I go to the library to find out why?  No, I figured out a better way to align and attach the wheels.

When the board warped badly, did I go to the library or ask the manufacturers of them why?  No, I figured out a way to make them by laminating different woods.

When the wheels wore out fast, did I......... No I went to the parks and watched others with better boards and found out what they were using.

When I tried making my boards of different sizes, shapes and styles, did I follow instructions of others?  No.  I just did it, going with what worked best.

 

And finally, when I could no longer make them fast enough to satisfy all my friends who wanted to buy them (they were the best on the block)  - I moved on to motorcycles and found a new hobby.  But that's just me, Rick.

Mic Todd,

 

So based on this skateboard analogy that you have spelled out it sounds as if it is a waste of time to give you any advice because you are just going to do what you want to anyway.

 

I can respect that but I will also probably not be giving any advice to your questions since you are going to only listen to it if you think it is the right thing to do.

 

Remember, those of us that help out a lot on this forum have made the mistakes, researched the hobby and or spent countless hours learning about the hobby from others.  I have listened to hundreds of hours of podcasts and brewed nearly 100 batches of beer and mead.  I have won many medals in beer competitions and am now also a BJCP beer judge.  I don't brew Mr. Beer batches any longer, in fact I have converted to All Grain brewing.  But I still take time on this forum to assist others who are just getting started in this hobby.  I have seen countless post from users on this forum that have asked for advice and not taken it or have gone all mad scientist with their brewing.  I have also seen many of them disappear from this forum.  Maybe they just moved on or more likely they quit the hobby. 

 

So when @RickBeeror any of us who have been here for a period of time give advice that you may not like. Understand that we are trying to keep you form the members who have disappeared from the hobby.  There is nothing personal in what some think are attacks.

 

Dawg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Shrike said:

 

I've only done it twice and neither batch lasted that long.  :)  I'm going to keep that in mind, though, for future batches, and probably omit the brown sugar.

 

If you omit brown sugar, as you say, what would you replace it with?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, Mic Todd said:

 

If you omit brown sugar, as you say, what would you replace it with?

Booster. 😛

ACTUALLY, I would play around with the MrBeer malt extacts in CAL to gain an idea of what each adds to the brew. Then try a few hop additions and steepong grains. From there, you're ready to fly on your own.

If you choose to go your own route, using your skateboarde analogy you'll likely have one wood wheel, one rubber wheel, two steel wheels one with ball bearings and one without.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, BDawg62 said:

Mic Todd,

 

So based on this skateboard analogy that you have spelled out it sounds as if it is a waste of time to give you any advice because you are just going to do what you want to anyway.

 

I can respect that but I will also probably not be giving any advice to your questions since you are going to only listen to it if you think it is the right thing to do.

 

Remember, those of us that help out a lot on this forum have made the mistakes, researched the hobby and or spent countless hours learning about the hobby from others.  I have listened to hundreds of hours of podcasts and brewed nearly 100 batches of beer and mead.  I have won many medals in beer competitions and am now also a BJCP beer judge.  I don't brew Mr. Beer batches any longer, in fact I have converted to All Grain brewing.  But I still take time on this forum to assist others who are just getting started in this hobby.  I have seen countless post from users on this forum that have asked for advice and not taken it or have gone all mad scientist with their brewing.  I have also seen many of them disappear from this forum.  Maybe they just moved on or more likely they quit the hobby. 

 

So when @RickBeeror any of us who have been here for a period of time give advice that you may not like. Understand that we are trying to keep you form the members who have disappeared from the hobby.  There is nothing personal in what some think are attacks.

 

Dawg

 

Not at all!  I have about 150 posts here asking questions, lots and lots of questions.  Rick's initial responses to me, (and many after that) was to read, study, go to his blogs, etc etc etc.  He was losing patience with me cause I was asking so many questions, I guess.

 

Well, I was doing a lot of reading, but then he told me to ignore some of those sources - one he even called a 'dark' site.  LOL  OK....

 

So, I came back about my wanting to learn as much as I could, from as many sources as I could and I didn't really know what was a "dark" site and what wasn't.  In the post about the skateboard analogy  I was stressing that I'm the type of person who likes to experiment (and will) in this hobby.  But by no means do I ever ignore others who know more than I - it's why I was asking so many questions in the first place.  I guess Rick wanted me to get my answers from the blog sites.  He seemed critical of my wanting to experiment and by asking so many questions. 

 

Now, I appreciate any advice I can get, from just about anyone kind enough to offer it.  You guys know a heck of a lot more about this hobby that I do and I am smart enough to know that!!  😎

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I probably need a few more batches under my belt before I begin steeping grains and things.  Plus, I need more equipment.  I have my eye on a good, stainless steel 6-qt stock pot that I need to pick up before I can do steeping but, yeah!  Steeping grains is definitely something I want to learn to do some day.  Baby steps first.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, RickBeer said:

If you look at the list of breweries that sold, and you go back and research things their owners said at points prior to selling, you'll find at least one brewery (Wicked Weed) that was very vocal about breweries that sold out.  Very vocal.  Then they did.

Elysian too. The whole “Corporate Beer Sucks” thing.  I get why Dick sold, the $ was just too good to say no to, so he took it.  Steve, his head brewer (creator of such beers as Space Dust), moved on and opened Cloudburst. Great guy, amazing beer. 

 

I get why why people do things. Like Arod taking 252 Million from TX after saying he will always be a Mariner and “It’s not all about the $”.  Yeah, well, 252 Million reasons can change someone’s mind for sure. 

 

My thing is dont be a HYPOCRITE!  Take me, I say #DrinkLocal and #DrinkCraft all the time, but admit that I am not infallible (but I’ve really been trying, especially lately). I also fully admit that if the check is fat enough, I’m gonna run to the bank with it as fast as my 2 fat handicapped legs can carry me (lets be honest,  in case it ever happens so I’m not part of a similar discussion down the line, I’m gonna drive to said bank!)  :) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Steeping grains and mashing are neither difficult or require special equipment. If you can boil water you're almost there. LOL. Only difference is holding the water temperature between 140-160 degrees for 30 to 60 minutes. I often still use our Farberware pots one the kitchen stovetop.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×