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oldbagobones

American Ale problem

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Been brewing an American Ale for the past three weeks.  Got ready to cold crash it and noticed that there was a large amount of yeast still at the top of the keg.  My previous brews the yeast had all dropped to the bottom.  I tasted a small bit and it seemed cidery.  One other thing, the expiration date was this past month and now I am wondering if the whole batch might be bad.  Any thoughts?

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1 hour ago, oldbagobones said:

Been brewing an American Ale for the past three weeks.  Got ready to cold crash it and noticed that there was a large amount of yeast still at the top of the keg.  My previous brews the yeast had all dropped to the bottom.  I tasted a small bit and it seemed cidery.  One other thing, the expiration date was this past month and now I am wondering if the whole batch might be bad.  Any thoughts?

if it's been 3 weeks, then I would go ahead and cold crash it. i'll bet that the stuff on top with settle out. what temp did you ferment for 3 weeks? also make sure and sanitize the spigot again if that's where you got your sample from. i have found that HME to be a bit cidery so more than likely it's nothing you did wrong. that's just how it tastes. some might argue otherwise.

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I brewed at a temp fluctuating between 64 - 68 degrees for the third week.  Tried to maintain a constant 68 but the temp cooled at night and I had to warm the room back up to 68 in the AM for about a week.  Our temps got low and I had no back up heat for two days and put a heater in the room for the remaining days until the three week time.

 

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35 minutes ago, oldbagobones said:

I brewed at a temp fluctuating between 64 - 68 degrees for the third week.  Tried to maintain a constant 68 but the temp cooled at night and I had to warm the room back up to 68 in the AM for about a week.  Our temps got low and I had no back up heat for two days and put a heater in the room for the remaining days until the three week time.

 

i aim for low 60's. especially that 1st week of fermentation. some say target 65 deg. the most basic way to control the temp would be a camping cooler with frozen water bottles in it. change them out once per day. I would just cold crash it and see whatcha got!

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Checked on the LBK this morning and it looks like no change in the floating stuff on the surface.  I'm beginning to think maybe the yeast was no good or maybe I have an infection.  I'll let this continue on it's cold crash for a couple more days and see if there is any change.

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Here's some advice.  STOP LOOKING.

Those are likely yeast rafts.  Hopefully you're not taking off the lid to look...

 

Cold crash for 3 days.  Bottle.  If they are floating when you bottle, it doesn't matter.  If they are not floating when you bottle, it doesn't matter.

 

RDWHAHB.

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Rickbeer why are you yelling? Lol.  I look because it is in a refrigerator that I use daily.  No, I didn't take off the top.  I am concerned due to the date on the can in my previous post.  It was past the buy by date and I was worried that the yeast may be bad.  Just looking for some knowledge about it.  Thanks for the encouragement tho!

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I think it's actually stated by a Mr. Beer rep.  I can tell you that I've brewed 2 year old cans myself.  They may be a tad darker, but Mr. Beer brews are always darker than style.

 

When you're ready to bottle, take a small taste.  If it tastes like uncarbonated beer, you're good.  Then bottle away.


And remember with cold crashing, you setup, remove it from the frig, and bottle.  Don't let it sit on the counter for an hour while you get ready to bottle.  

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By the way, I put "stop looking" in big type (should have been upper and lower case so it wasn't taken as shouting" as tongue-in-cheek because often new brewers "perv" their LBK multiple times a day.  "I see bubbles" (thanks Lawrence Welk) or "there's a bunch of crud on the bottom, what's that?" or "I stuck in my frog to test it...".


The cure is to not look.  If you ferment at the right temp, let it sit for 3 weeks and then cold crash (if you want) and bottle.  I've never, cough, cough, looked at my beer during the fermentation period.  Not once.  Not 7 times.

 

I've made 128 batches.  I have not looked 128 times...  

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7 minutes ago, RickBeer said:

The cure is to not look.  If you ferment at the right temp, let it sit for 3 weeks and then cold crash (if you want) and bottle.  I've never, cough, cough, looked at my beer during the fermentation period.  Not once.  Not 7 times.

 

I've made 128 batches.  I have not looked 128 times...  

 

Now brewing my 4th, Rick and I confess I did look, at my first batch, once.  It's not easy to see anything happening thru the brown plastic of the LBK and so I just gave up doing it on the next three batches.  But it's pretty hard not to want to see what the heck is going on in there the 1st time you try this!!  lol  😎

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I get that "don't look" thing.  I have brewed several of the LBK's now and I don't as a rule poke it, look in it, or any of the other colloquialisms that we can come up with.  I admit I am not a seasoned old brewer, but I have enough sense to listen to what the experienced people have to say.  My only concern was, it did not look like my past brews did when I was ready to cold crash, and just needed to hear from others that may have experienced the same thing.  Just being cautious, and didn't want to waste my time.  Thanks for your replies.

 

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Lol, I'm in the other camp. I want to know what's going on, particularly that first week!

 

 I always perv mine with a flashlight during krausen if its in an LBK to make sure fermentation has started. After I'm satisfied that its kicked off and a day or two later it hasn't overflowed then I don't until its time to cold crash or dry hop as long as the inkbird readings are okay. My other fermenters are ss, so nothing to be seen but the tube bubbling in the blow off jar. I perv those as well during krausen for the same reason to make sure fermentation has kicked off and also no overflows from the jar. I perv my inkbird  every couple of days.

 

A good deal of that is ingrained from over 25 years in production management where you can't assume everything is fine without verifying by putting your own eyeballs on it.

 

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