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On Saturday, November 17, 2018 at 5:47 PM, Cato said:

Actually I think we're probably fine with extract and extract pm recipes. It's the all grain recipes that may need slight water adjustments.

I don't doubt that a bit. All I am clumsily trying to say is if you can add one step to your AG mash, I don't see how you or I could be far off from that number. Mother Nature, the maltster and chemistry do the work. In my inexperienced opinion, PH adjustments are for people who don't want to add that step.

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@Bonsai & Brew

May be of interest or not. A forum members response post from another site, where the OP had very low ph readings , 4.89, in his samples taken early in a cooler mashtun, but then got a 5.39 ph from the preboil wort in the BK. No sparge mash in the cooler mashtun for a pale ale.

 

I had not considered when would be the recommended time to take the mash ph readings, so I need to do some further readings, and to also see if the post below carries any weight. Good thing that I've got a little break before my next brew session!

"Pale malts are "effectively" basic with respect to typical mash pH targets. There is clearly no mechanismaside from acid addition or acid malt addition which could conceivably result in such a false low pH reading. I presume this might likely be a case whereby the requisite and pre-determined acid addition was made directly to the mash, and not to the mash water pre the mash, whereby it could receive adequate mixing to uniformly disperse it. Or a case of inadequate stirring during the mash. Or both. It is assuredly a case of premature sampling, which inevitably will yield a false low pH reading to begin with (whereby the solution to this delema is to never sample until at least 30 minutes have gone by in the mash, and to stir, stir, stir). If the pre-boil pH was 5.39, this reading is a much better reflection of the actual mash pH conditions. My preferred time to sample mash pH is at the 60 minute mark of the mashing step, but others agree that 30 minutes is the earliest sampling point with any level of validity.

Other reasons for a false low pH reading include:
1) Stirring the sample with the pH probe and taking the pH reading while stirring
2) Not allowing the pH probe to sit in an undisturbed sample for up to several minutes to fully stabilize
3) Reading pH on a sample that is above room temperature, and incorrectly presuming that ATC will correct for this."
 
 

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I guess I'll plan on getting a ph meter at some point but my spring water tests at 5 on the test strips and I checked my mash on this last batch after adding the appropriate amount of 5.2 stabilizer and it read 5 as well.

Whether the stabilizer had significant effect or not, I'll have to check next time without adding any stabilizer.

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On ‎11‎/‎17‎/‎2018 at 2:15 PM, Squirley Mic said:

Does anyone here (Rick?) know what substituting Safale US-04 for 05 will do the the Surley Dog recipe?  With my limited knowledge, I  really don't know if I should try it.  But I have no more 05 left.  I did find this, so maybe I answered my own question:

"English yeast (US-04) will attenuate less, leaving a higher final gravity for a more malt-focused beer and the American yeast (US-05) will attenuate more, resulting in a lower final gravity for a dryer beer. "  Briarcliff Brewing      Does he know what he's talking about?

😟

This is why the Mr B yeast makes malty brews isn't it, as it attenuates less than US-05?

 

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45 minutes ago, BDawg62 said:

Cato,

 

Test strips aren't very accurate.

 

PH meter is the better way to go.  And I will tell you my cheap one is more frustration to me than it is worth.

 

Dawg

Thanks! I've been looking at an Apera digital that has a replaceable sensor. Seems to get good reviews @Creeps McLane.

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5 hours ago, Nickfixit said:

This is why the Mr B yeast makes malty brews isn't it, as it attenuates less than US-05?

 

 

Oh!  Well, now I've learned something else new.  I mean, I have not been able to locate any substantial data on what (exactly) is inside those MRB yeast packets, but I have seen a lot of recipes of theirs that call for something else and this could be why.  I'm slowly accumulating a small jar of MRB yeast packets and a much larger one of MRB Booster packs.  Thanks Nickfixit

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9 hours ago, Nickfixit said:

This is why the Mr B yeast makes malty brews isn't it, as it attenuates less than US-05?

 

Funny thing. I brewed a black ipa last weekend. I wanted a nice sweetness to the finished product. Traditionally you would use a north west yeast strain, but i went with london ale III because i wanted some english fruity sweet flavors. Turns out, london III attenuates more than northwest ale yeast... SOB

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Oy, also aiming for less attenuation in my current ale fermenting. Trying S-04 for the first time. Seems to take off fast, pitched in the morning and at bedtime blowoff jar was gurgling.

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S-04 is a fickle yeast as are most English strains.  Be sure to not let the wort cool below the current fermentation temperature or the yeast will drop out and go to sleep to early.  I always allow my English strains to raise 1 degree per day during fermentation to ensure that it doesn't drop early.

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9 minutes ago, BDawg62 said:

S-04 is a fickle yeast as are most English strains.  Be sure to not let the wort cool below the current fermentation temperature or the yeast will drop out and go to sleep to early.  I always allow my English strains to raise 1 degree per day during fermentation to ensure that it doesn't drop early.

Thanks for the heads up, Dawg! Temp controller set for 65 and 1 degree differential set for the heat side. That'll hold it 64 as a low and 66 as a high.

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The recipe builders can give indication of the yeast attenuation when you select the yeast. I found it interesting to see the variations on FG. But it will also affect residual sweetness.

Look at the range, from a saison or champagne yeast at 90%, to ale yeasts at 70%.

 

https://www.brewersfriend.com/homebrew/recipe/calculator

 

The "Cry Havoc" liquid yeast gives pretty sweet/malty result and you can use it for ales and lagers too.

 

 

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