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Mic Todd

Safale US-05 vs Safale S-33

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I'm about to brew my first batch of Pumpkin Rising and now realize that I do not have any Safale S-33 brewing yeast.  I do, however, have a half packet of fresh Safale US-05 left over from my last (experimental) batch.  My question here for forum posters is what would likely be the issues of substituting the US-05 for the S-33?  OR, should I go with the MRB yeast that came with the Bewitched Amber instead?  What I read about the S-33 is it is a Dry Ale yeast with LOW floculation whereas the US-05, likewise a Dry Ale yeast, has a MEDIUM floculation.  Don't know anything about the MRB yeast cause they never state anything about it on their site.  Thanks -

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If it was me I'd use the US-05. I've only used the MB yeast once or twice but wasn't as happy with it as the US-05 and others. S-33 I've never used.

 

Good idea to keep a small selection of yeasts on hand in a ziplock in the fridge. I always keep some back ups like US-05, 04, and Nottingham. Those will generally suffice for the majority of my brews.

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21 minutes ago, MRB Tim said:

Hey Mic, S-33 and US-05 are about as different as you can get. S-33 is a very low attenuator, meaning it leaves a relatively high amount of residual sugar. so you'll lose a lot of sweetness with US-05. That's neither a good nor a bad thing, it just depends on what you like. 

Hmmm - I didn't know that.  Well, it's kinda what it is I guess, Tim.  The nearest brewing supply store to us is over 70 miles away.  I used the 05 because it's what I had.  Next time I will make sure of the right yeast, tho I still think it may turn out OK.  You guys have almost made things idiot proof for us beginners.  😎

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I think I need to heed the advice of Cato's and build me a small inventory of brewing ingredients for situations just like this.  As soon as I learn more about proper storage techniques for the different ingredients.  I think I need to put together another MRB order soon ~

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Make sure if you're going to build an inventory that you think it through first.  For example, lay out a list of X recipes in the next Y months, and figure out the things you might need.  Yeast and hops are perishable, but stored properly can keep well.  Always buy from a known supplier, and if you can specify on the yeast (newest batch possible).

 

I bought a bunch of stuff in 2016.  Then in 2017 I went and got a brewing education and didn't brew for a year.  When I resumed in Spring 2018, some yeast was long in the tooth.  Proper storage (frig) meant they were all viable.

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1 hour ago, RickBeer said:

Make sure if you're going to build an inventory that you think it through first.  For example, lay out a list of X recipes in the next Y months, and figure out the things you might need.  Yeast and hops are perishable, but stored properly can keep well.  Always buy from a known supplier, and if you can specify on the yeast (newest batch possible).

 

I bought a bunch of stuff in 2016.  Then in 2017 I went and got a brewing education and didn't brew for a year.  When I resumed in Spring 2018, some yeast was long in the tooth.  Proper storage (frig) meant they were all viable.

I second what @RickBeer said above.

 

I have an inventory of dry yeast that I keep in my brew fridge.  But it is only the basics, 1 Nottingham, and a few US-05.  I basically keep them in the event something goes wrong with the liquid yeast I bought for a particular recipe.

 

I also keep left over hops vaccume packed in the freezer.  In addition, I vaccume all of my left over grains from recipes as well. 

 

Then every 6 months or so I put together a recipe that uses my left overs.  Usually not the best beer I brew but always drinkable.

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9 minutes ago, BDawg62 said:

I second what @RickBeer said above.

 

I have an inventory of dry yeast that I keep in my brew fridge.  But it is only the basics, 1 Nottingham, and a few US-05.  I basically keep them in the event something goes wrong with the liquid yeast I bought for a particular recipe.

 

I also keep left over hops vaccume packed in the freezer.  In addition, I vaccume all of my left over grains from recipes as well. 

 

Then every 6 months or so I put together a recipe that uses my left overs.  Usually not the best beer I brew but always drinkable.

 

Same here.  I've had some pleasurable discoveries that way, too, like flaked red wheat and CAL make a good pairing.

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2 hours ago, Shrike said:

 

Same here.  I've had some pleasurable discoveries that way, too, like flaked red wheat and CAL make a good pairing.

 

When you say pairing flaked red wheat with the CAL, what do you mean exact;y?

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57 minutes ago, Mic Todd said:

 

When you say pairing flaked red wheat with the CAL, what do you mean exact;y?

 

I had some leftover flaked red wheat along with some other lighter grains. I made this:

 

-  2oz each 2-row, Munich, and red flaked wheat, mashed for 30 minutes.

-  Add Booster, bring to a boil.

-  1/2 oz Chinook for 20 minutes.

-  1/2 oz each Chinook and Citra for 10 minutes.

-  1 CAL HME.

-  MRB yeast.

-  Dry hop with 1/2 oz Citra a week before bottling.

 

I've made variations on it a few times using different hops.  The wheat gives a nice, subtle tint to the beer and adds to head retention.  Note that it is a bitter beer, but I like a good bitter.  Next time I make it I may use a Pale LME instead of the Booster.

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13 minutes ago, Shrike said:

 

I had some leftover flaked red wheat along with some other lighter grains. I made this:

 

The wheat gives a nice, subtle tint to the beer and adds to head retention.  Note that it is a bitter beer, but I like a good bitter.  Next time I make it I may use a Pale LME instead of the Booster.

 

I didn't know the wheat could/would add to head retention.  This is exceedingly interesting to me.  Thanks Shrike - mind if I bookmark this recipe and do you have a name for it? 

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21 minutes ago, Mic Todd said:

 

I didn't know the wheat could/would add to head retention.  This is exceedingly interesting to me.  Thanks Shrike - mind if I bookmark this recipe and do you have a name for it? 

Here's the description of red wheat flakes from the MRB site:  "Flaked Wheat greatly increases body and head retention in most any beer. Use in small quantities to prevent haze. Use 1-4 oz in ales, 2-6 oz in wheat beers."

When I started getting into PM brews I sat down and read the descriptions of every grain that MRB sells (along with all of their hops).  If you've got the time, I recommend it.  Pour a home brew and expand your knowledge of grains used in brewing.  :)  You'll start to see why certain grains are used with certain styles of beer.  And even better, you'll start to think about crafting your own PMs using grains that'll compliment certain HMEs.  That becomes helpful when you start having leftover grains from recipes that only use two ounces of a four ounce package of grain.

Feel free to bookmark the recipe.  Here's a link to the original post about it, and how I came up with its name, "Crafty Bitch".

 

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50 minutes ago, Shrike said:

Here's the description of red wheat flakes from the MRB site:  "Flaked Wheat greatly increases body and head retention in most any beer. Use in small quantities to prevent haze. Use 1-4 oz in ales, 2-6 oz in wheat beers."

When I started getting into PM brews I sat down and read the descriptions of every grain that MRB sells (along with all of their hops).  If you've got the time, I recommend it.  Pour a home brew and expand your knowledge of grains used in brewing.  :)  You'll start to see why certain grains are used with certain styles of beer.  And even better, you'll start to think about crafting your own PMs using grains that'll compliment certain HMEs.  That becomes helpful when you start having leftover grains from recipes that only use two ounces of a four ounce package of grain.

Feel free to bookmark the recipe.  Here's a link to the original post about it, and how I came up with its name, "Crafty Bitch".

 

 

That's good advice, about learning about the different grains and beer styles.  I guess I hadn't figured on getting that involved when I began this hobby but this is all so interesting to know about.  btw, I like the name you gave your recipe, it might just go well with my 'Gone Dog Brewing, Inc.' lineup!  😊

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40 minutes ago, MRB Tim said:

 

Glad you had this handy so I didn't have to type it all out

 

 

That's kind of a big question. What do you want to know about it?

 

This is why I enjoy the forum so much, lots of knowledgeable brewers on here. 

That said, I can see why MRB uses this yeast: pretty much medium across the board in terms of attenuation, floculation and tolerance to alcohol, plus the wide range of optimum temps.  Perfect for beginners like myself.  I do know this, the MRB yeasts worked just fine on 3 of my 4 batches so far.  On one batch, I substituted US-05 just to play around a bit and experiment.  I'm certainly not throwing any yeast of theirs away when I substitute another for it.  Pretty handy to have on hand.  Thanks to D Kristoff and yourself for the information!

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55 minutes ago, MRB Tim said:

 

Glad you had this handy so I didn't have to type it all out

 

 

That's kind of a big question. What do you want to know about it?

 

I need to learn more about the different yeasts before I can ask an intelligent question.  But for starters there was the case where I was wondering what using the MRB yeast in the can of St Pat's vs the one MRB recommends when brewing the Shameless Stout.  I believe you and Rick both answered that question.  Now, I need to learn more about 'floculation' and why that affects things because this is what seems to be one of the differences between the Coopers/MRB yeast and the S-04.  btw, I have a friend who has offered to pick me up a packet of the S-04 when he goes to Eugene this weekend - that way I won't have to use the one with the can after all.  Eugene, Or is about 90 miles away from our home.  Nice of him to do that for me.

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Beer has 4 components - grain, hops, yeast, water.  You can vary any of them, many ways, and get many results.  The more you change at once, the less you understand about why you got what you got, and your ability to recreate it in the future.

 

I'd recommend you restrict your yeast choices unless there is a strong reason to change, instead focusing on the difference in different steeping grains, and different hops.

 

For example, make several batches of one refill, say CAL, and use different hops to dry hop.  Teaches you in a neutral beer what differences those hops make.  Or, make a batch using a packet of light LME vs. a packet of robust LME.  See if you can tell the difference in a blind test.  See if you can taste the flavors you get.  Learn how to properly evaluate a beer.

 

I've been brewing for over 6 years.  Here is the extensive list of yeast that I have used in that time:

 

- Original (pre-Cooper's) Mr. Beer Yeast

- Cooper's Mr. Beer Yeast

- S-05

- S-04

- Nottingham

- Windsor

- Whatever came with one can I bought of another HME

- A lager yeast for the one batch of lager I made

 

Here is a list of the different water treatments I have tried:

 

- My well water

 

I know I've harped on this theme, and I'll continue to, because I think it's the best way for someone to learn, and I try to learn in everything I do.  

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On Saturday, November 10, 2018 at 8:15 AM, RickBeer said:

Beer has 4 components - grain, hops, yeast, water.  You can vary any of them, many ways, and get many results.  The more you change at once, the less you understand about why you got what you got, and your ability to recreate it in the future.

 

I'd recommend you restrict your yeast choices unless there is a strong reason to change, instead focusing on the difference in different steeping grains, and different hops.

 

For example, make several batches of one refill, say CAL, and use different hops to dry hop.  Teaches you in a neutral beer what differences those hops make.  Or, make a batch using a packet of light LME vs. a packet of robust LME.  See if you can tell the difference in a blind test.  See if you can taste the flavors you get.  Learn how to properly evaluate a beer.

 

I've been brewing for over 6 years.  Here is the extensive list of yeast that I have used in that time:

 

- Original (pre-Cooper's) Mr. Beer Yeast

- Cooper's Mr. Beer Yeast

- S-05

- S-04

- Nottingham

- Windsor

- Whatever came with one can I bought of another HME

- A lager yeast for the one batch of lager I made

 

Here is a list of the different water treatments I have tried:

 

- My well water

 

I know I've harped on this theme, and I'll continue to, because I think it's the best way for someone to learn, and I try to learn in everything I do.  

^^^THIS^^^

Back in January my local homebrew club conducted an experiment to demonstrate to sceptical members how variables affect brewing. 20 people took the same pale ale wort, used the same hops and hop schedule and fermented 5 gallon batches within a 2 degree temperature variation. The biggest variable was yeast selection. 10 different yeasts were pitched. In summary, there were 20 different beers. In side by side comparison of two beers with the same yeast the beers were different. 

You need to know your methods will affect your beer. You need to know how individual ingredients brewed with your methods affect your beer. 

IMHO, the variables are what make this hobby fascinating.

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