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ewildcat7

Pumpkin Rising

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The holiday season has made me think of pumpkin beer.  I was looking through the Coopers and Mr. Beer recipes and found that they each have a beer called Pumpkin Rising.  They have similarities and differences.  So, I wanted to ask those on here who are more experienced than I am for their option as to which one you all think would be better based on the respective ingredients.  Here are the recipes:

 

https://www.diybeer.com/au/recipe/pumpkin-rising.html

https://www.mrbeer.com/pumpkin-rising-recipe

 

Thanks in advance!

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First off, I am NOT an experienced brewer, having only just made my 5th batch of beer with the LBK.  However, the 4th batch I made (and am cold-crashing now as I write) was MRB's Pumpkin Rising, but with a couple small changes, mostly using a different yeast, a home-made pumpkin puree and home-made spices probably different than what MRB used to provide with this recipe.  Finally, I am considering bottle priming this beer with something other than the carbo drops MRB includes with their kits.  Perhaps brown sugar?

 

I can say this about the MRB recipe:  it smells and tastes delicious, having taken samples (just before pitching the yeast and after fermentation) to check brix readings.  Second, the MRB recipe makes a fairly high-gravity wort with the potential for a beer around 7+%.  Plus, the color of the wort is just about what one would expect: a golden orange, like pumpkin beer should look. ( I'll know more in a couple days when I bottle the beer).

 

I can't speak about the diybeer recipe, but the mrb recipe seems to be good and if the final product tastes like the samples tested, will be really good: not too spicy or over-powering but smooth and flavorful with great aroma.  You probably won't go wrong using either recipe.  Let us know what you decide and how it turns out!  Good luck -

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I know it is the right time of year for pumpkin beer with the holidays being around us.  But I am an American living in Australia, so it is getting to be summer now and it doesn't feel right making a heavier beer.  So, I am going to hold off for a few more months when this beer would be ready for the Australian winter.

 

That said, I think I am going to do a combination of the 2 recipes.  I am going to go with the canned pumpkin from the MRB recipe, rather than using a squash (that is what they call "pumpkin" in Australia), but use the blend of spices from the Coopers recipe, rather than the pumpkin pie spice that MRB calls for.  I am assuming that the differences in the ingredients are because canned pumpkin and pumpkin pie spice are not as readily available in Australia as they are in America.

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Here in America MRB is not offering canned pumpkin with their recipe, nor even the spices any longer.  So, we used my wife's pumpkin that she grew and her own concoction of spices that approximated most store-bought 'pumpkin pie spices' (sans the Allspice and less of the cloves).  Next year, i'm going to make this again but using Butternut squash.  The wife says she's done with growing pumpkins - takes up too much room in the garden.

 

My son-in-law made pumpkin beer a few years ago (5 gal batch) using squash (don't know which type) and champagne yeast.  I don't know what the champagne yeast did but the beer itself was absolutely one of the best beers I had ever tasted, then or since.  It was incredible.  There was only a bare trace of spice on the palette.  If he hadn't told me it was a 'pumpkin beer' I would have never guessed.  Alas, he and his friend only 'winged' it and wrote nothing down as to quantities, brix, times, etc.  As a result, he has never been able to reproduce it to the same quality.  What a shame.

 

I think my own (that I'm crashing now) is going to be pretty good.  But the proof, as they say, will be in the tasting - in about 8-10 more weeks.  When we're drinking it, I'll post a pic of it and my opinion of how it turned out.  I bottle Thursday - so I need to decide on whether to use brown sugar, carbo drops or honey to carbonate with, soon.  I'm open to any thoughts from anyone on this....

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2 hours ago, RickBeer said:

As stated on the other thread, you're wasting your money bottling with anything but table sugar.

 

That's why I was asking around. Carbo drops are kinda spendy, esp if one buys them 22-to-a-pack, at a time.

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14 minutes ago, ewildcat7 said:

do the carb drops ever go bad?  If not, I may stock up when they are on sale (this happens a lot in Australia)

 

Not that I'm aware of, as long as they don't get damp.  However, Rick Beer has convinced me a much cheaper way to go (for bottle priming) is to use plain table sugar.  The MRB instructions list how much to use per size of bottle.  There are also lots of other things you can use as well, like honey, brown sugar, molasses, etc.  There are websites that will calculate how much of each to use, including these two: 

 

PRIMING SUGAR CALCULATOR:  https://www.northernbrewer.com/pages/priming-sugar-calculator

OR:  http://www.thescrewybrewer.com/p/brewing-tools-formulas.html#bpc

A handy thing to keep in mind when using the calculators is that there are 48 teaspoons in 1 cup.  Helps you figure how many tsp to use per bottle.

Carbo drops are very convenient but are probably the most expensive way to go.


 

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When stores in Australia put them on sale, with today's exchange rate, they work out to less than $2 per bag.  While I agree that is more expensive than using table sugar, the convenience makes it worth the slightly elevated cost.  Plus, when free shipping is offered from Coopers, I can always top off my order with enough bags of carb drops to get to the minimum amount to qualify for the free shipping.

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57 minutes ago, ewildcat7 said:

When stores in Australia put them on sale, with today's exchange rate, they work out to less than $2 per bag.  While I agree that is more expensive than using table sugar, the convenience makes it worth the slightly elevated cost.  Plus, when free shipping is offered from Coopers, I can always top off my order with enough bags of carb drops to get to the minimum amount to qualify for the free shipping.

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Each cube is 1/2 tsp.  One cube in a 12oz bottle, two in a pint or 500ml bottle, three in a 740ml bottle.  Cheaper than carb drops and just as easy to use.

 

 

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20 hours ago, Shrike said:

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Each cube is 1/2 tsp.  One cube in a 12oz bottle, two in a pint or 500ml bottle, three in a 740ml bottle.  Cheaper than carb drops and just as easy to use.

 

 

 

Great idea.  I once used several boxes of sugar cubes to make a pyramid for a science-fair project (10-11 years old).  I lathered them in a paste made of flour and water.  It was messy as all get out (dear, ol mom was so understanding and helpful) but it won me a blue ribbon at the fair.  But NOW I have an even better reason to stock back up on these babies!  Thankx!!

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