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Lionfan67

Miller Lite

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Water.

 

Sorry, but if I didn't say it, a dozen other's here would.  And Miller Lite is my go-to beer when I just want a good buzz

 

Miller Lite is a lager, which would take extra equipment for a brewer, such as temperature control device and a dedicated fridge.  You'd have to at least start with the CAL HME, and step some light grains, then ferment with a lager yeast.  I have strong feelings that it isn't possible to make a Miller Lite with what Mr. Beer sells online.

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Try brewing the Classic American Lite a.k.a. CAL straight up. Won't be Miller Light, but it won't be Bud Light either. As Miniyoda said, it will be an ale not a lager, but that's just a yeast difference.

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@RickBeer please feel free to correct anything I'm stating that is wrong.

 

1)  Miller Lite is a lager, not an ale.  Basic recipes on Mr. Beer's site, and most other kits on other locations, are ales.  To me, Lagers are more crisp tasting than ales.

2)  I've brewed CAL as an ale, and while the color is off and it is more opaque than an American Adjunct Lager, it didn't come out that bad.

3)  It is very difficult, if not somewhat impossible, to brew a beer based on only Mr. Beer recipes/ingredients and clone a commercial beer. 

 

That being said, the beers you can make from Mr. Beer's recipes are very good, and with some time, skills and patience, they can be excellent.  Enjoy your new hobby.  When I started, I wanted to brew beer cheaper than I could by it in the store.  I discovered the art of the science and the science of the art, and a LOT of new beer styles, and what make them that way.

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14 hours ago, Lionfan67 said:

What is the best recipe that is closest to Miller Lite?

 

Go to a horse barn.  Hold a bucket under a horse and wait for them to fill it with piss...  Then add water for Miller "Lite".  True fact - Bud Light is regular Bud with water added.  

 

As has been stated, you're not going to clone a commercial beer with a Mr. Beer recipe.  

 

For Miller (or Bud), in addition to the responses posted, both are brewed with adjuncts (corn, rice) in addition to barley.  These adjuncts allows the beer to be lighter than a beer brewed from malted grain.  Bud uses rice, Miller uses corn.  Miller also uses a proprietary hop compound.  Corn and rice were used in brewing early in this country's founding because they were cheaper than using barley, and the barley grown in the US was very different than the barley that European immigrants were used to in their countries.    Corn and rice are generally cheaper than using equivalent amounts of barley, partly because they don't have to be malted.

 

If you're a Miller or Bud drinker, i.e. you like them and want to brew them, then being a homebrewer is probably not for you.  While it does take great skill to brew these "beers" consistently from facility to facility, they don't compare in taste, flavor, or aroma to a well-made craft beer, or a homebrewed beer.  

 

https://www.thespruceeats.com/why-do-some-brewers-use-rice-or-corn-in-their-beer-353284

 

If you appreciate the quality of craft beer, you should consider WHO you give your money to.  AB InBev is a company that is determined to take all the possible shelf space and drive the craft brewers out of business.  They've been buying up craft brewers, and the average consumer has no idea that these breweries are not owned by a family or small company.  In addition, they've been buying up homebrew stores.  I don't give them my money.


AB InBev owns Northern Brewer and Midwest.


AB InBev owns the following "craft brands" or former craft breweries (they are no longer considered craft beer due to 25%+ ownership by a non-craft brewery:

 

Elysian (Seattle)

32% ownership of Craft Brew Alliance (Portland) - Kona Brewing Company, Redhook, Widmer Brothers, and a few others

10 Barrel Brewing Company (Bend, Oregon)

Golden Road (LA)

Breckenridge Brewing (Breckenridge, CO)

Blue Point (Patchogue, NY)

Wicked Weed (Asheville, NC)

Goose Island (Chicago, IL)

Karbach (Houston, TX)

Four Peaks (Tempe, AZ)

Devil's Backbone (Roseland, VA)

 

Fake craft brands, always owned by the big brewers:

 

Blue Moon

Rolling Rock (bought in 1987)

Shock Top

Landshark

George Killian's

Grolsch (bought in 2007)

 

I'm sure this list is not complete.

 

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15 hours ago, Lionfan67 said:

What is the best recipe that is closest to Miller Lite?

Lionfan67,

 

First of all, welcome to the forum.  I hope you stick around after being beaten up with your first post.

 

Don't listen to the grumpy old man above.  If you are a Miller Lite drinker and want to brew something similar then so be it.  That is the great thing about being a homebrewer, you can brew what you want.

 

With regard to a recipe that is closest it would be Classic American Light straight up from Mr. Beer.  In homebrew competitions this beer style is rarely attempted because of the hatred but also because it is difficult to brew well, but it can be and is done.

 

Most craft beer people hate AB InBev and Miller/Coors as do I, but as a brewer I also have a great deal of respect for them.  Think about it, no matter where in the US that you buy a Budweiser, Bud Light, Miller Lite or Coors each one will taste exactly the same.  As a brewer being able to achieve this in multiple batches not to mention from multiple breweries is an awesome accomplishment. 

 

Dawg

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What these guys said.  Try the CAL (Classic American Light).  Then try it with a little extra stuff, like additional malt extract.  Then again with some extra hops.  Then again, but this time start with steeping or mashing some grains.  Next thing you know you'll be a homebrew fanatic.  :)

 

You can make some great beers with MRB.  I hope you stick around and try it.

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22 minutes ago, zorak1066 said:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AB_InBev_brands

 

easier to ask what dont they control...

 

how is this not a monopoly????

wow.....had no idea about some of my favorite brands. don't know if I will stop buying modelo negra and space dust, but good to know. more likely to support my local HBS or MRB and buy the ingredients to try and replicate brews that i really like.

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Ive waited, and i bit my tongue but now i will speak. 

 

I agree with @RickBeer. If you’re getting into homebrewing and you want to mimick bud light or coors, youre better off buying it in the store for the ridiculous cheap price. Wasnt this hobby a way for beer lovers to make the beers that they couldnt just run out to the store and buy? I get that these days its hard to not be able to find any style of beer in the liquor store but then most times i can brew any style for a fraction of the cost of the craft beer mark up. 

 

I guess i should mind my own business. Maybe the OP was asking because he wants to make a beer that he can share with others and be proud that he can make an easy drinking beer like a bud light. I did the same thing when i started so i could drink my homebrew with my father who has cheap taste.

 

Im just sayin that if a person enters this hobby soley to brew a bud light like beer then theyre going to find out in a hurry that it is not economical, especially with MRB prices to do so and that person will more than likely leave the hobby quickly. Brew what makes you happy, youre the one drinking it, just be realistic in your expectations. 

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On 12/4/2018 at 5:08 PM, Lionfan67 said:

What is the best recipe that is closest to Miller Lite?

@Lionfan67, welcome to the forum, if your still here after such an opinionated reception.

 

We should all be here to help and encourage new brewers and not be judgemental about anyone's beer preference whether it be a commercial or craft beer. 

 

When I'm looking for a clone recipe I Google for it and also go to the manufacturer's web page to get any details they can provide. Some vendors will have clone extract kits that you can purchase. I usually end up combining ingredients from one or more recipes to try and clone the beer and it's usually a mix of grains and liquid malt extract.

 

So, if you want to brew Miller lite, I'd suggest getting your feet wet with a couple of the Mr Beer kit cans if that's what you have, just to get familiar with the process of brewing, sanitation, fermenting at correct temperatures(which will likely differ from your instructions), and bottling.

 

Don't expect great results at first. Most of us had poor to disastrous first batch or so. If you get great results,lol, then you'll be way ahead on the learning curve.

 

It's a fun hobby and you can brew beer, good beer, in a number of ways with very little in the way of equipment up to very sophisticated and anywhere in between.

 

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hoppy, stop wasting perfectly good vodka in coffee.  you put rock and rye in coffee.. or seagrams.

incidentally- discovered McCormick Distillery's 360 Vodka. cheap.. smooth... no headache. good stuff. i would rate it better than luksasova.

 

as for sticker shock with mr b kit prices.. when you do the math for cost per gallon, yeah.  it's not cheap... but when you consider that they have done most of the work for you....

 

i used my mr b days to build up skills enough to do 5 gallon kits (which are still not very economical).. and this lead to all grain. AG brewing once you gather all the equipment is dirt cheap. lots and lots of work..  but the savings are good.

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7 hours ago, zorak1066 said:

hoppy, stop wasting perfectly good vodka in coffee.  you put rock and rye in coffee.. or seagrams.

incidentally- discovered McCormick Distillery's 360 Vodka. cheap.. smooth... no headache. good stuff. i would rate it better than luksasova.

 

as for sticker shock with mr b kit prices.. when you do the math for cost per gallon, yeah.  it's not cheap... but when you consider that they have done most of the work for you....

 

i used my mr b days to build up skills enough to do 5 gallon kits (which are still not very economical).. and this lead to all grain. AG brewing once you gather all the equipment is dirt cheap. lots and lots of work..  but the savings are good.

Well said! It's a winding road from extract, partial mash, and AG. I've followed it for learning but certainly have noticed the difference in price and volume output between grain and extract.

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On ‎12‎/‎7‎/‎2018 at 2:02 AM, zorak1066 said:

 

 

as for sticker shock with mr b kit prices.. when you do the math for cost per gallon, yeah.  it's not cheap... but when you consider that they have done most of the work for you....

 

i used my mr b days to build up skills enough to do 5 gallon kits (which are still not very economical).. and this lead to all grain. AG brewing once you gather all the equipment is dirt cheap. lots and lots of work..  but the savings are good.

 

 

With all due respect, @zorak1066, I'm going to have to challenge this statement.

 

Today I bottled the Winter Dark Ale....19 bottles.  The price of the HME is $22.  Add two gallons of water from the store (less that $2), 19 bottle caps (2 cents each), some expense from the electricity when boiling the water (none from washing/sanitizing, as I don't pay the water bill), taxes and shipping costs to get the HME, etc, etc, etc.  But overall, I can't imagen having spent $38, or $2/bottle for this recipe.  Would you go to your favorite liquor store and spend $2 for a bottle of a beer of this style?

 

Tomorrow I am brewing the Abbey Dubbel.  The kit is $33.27. again add about $1.75 for two gallon jugs of water, 18 cents for the bottle caps, etc, etc, etc.  I still don't see it costing more than $47.50 overall for 19 bottles of this (20, if I'm lucky).  That's $2.50/bottle.  Try to find this beer in a bottle for that price in the store.

 

Sometimes I brew 5 gallon batches from Brewer's Best.  Online I can find them for less than $40.  5 gallons is 640 oz, which is about 53 bottles.  Now, for easy math, let's say I spent $48 to buy the kit and have it shipped, taxes, jugs of water, bottle caps, etc, etc, etc, and let's say I only got 48 bottles, (trub, etc, etc, etc).  That's about $1/bottle.  Rather nice price for a craft beer.

 

Now, you are going to say "hey...….ignore the bottling.....it's $5 to $8 for a pint of a craft beer at the local breweries".  True.  But now you are talking larger batches, and all grain, kegging, CO2, etc, etc, etc.  I'm not going to do the math on that because I don't do all grain.

 

If you get Mr. Beer on one of their sales (I bought both the Winter Dark Ale and the Abbey Dubble on 30% off), yea, I can see where even brewing beer with Mr. Beer kits is actually cheaper than buying it commercially.  There are other ways to think of savings:

 

- If I brew the beer, you grill the burgers, and we'll chill out by the pool.  Free food for me, free beer for you.

- If I brew six different recipes, I'll give you a 6-pack of different beers for Christmas.  How much do you spend on Christmas gifts for friends/family.

 

Overall, I still think home brewing, be it Mr. Beer kits, online 5 gallon kits, etc, is cheaper than buying in the store or at the local brewery.  Plus, you can share with family/friends, and earn bragging rights.

 

P.S.  I'm only referencing craft beers.  Yes, it would be hard to brew an over-produced American Lager at home for the price you can buy it in the store.

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3 zombies partial mash kit- $35

divided over your 19 bottles- $1.84 per bottle / $11.04 per sixer

3 Floyd’s Zombie Dust is probably like $14 for a sixer? I’m guessing

thats $2.33 per bottle. Not bad

 

my ipa I’m brewing tonight cost me $3.12 per six pack. Let’s just say that a sixer of two hearted is $10? I just bought a crap ton of beer from Tavour for approx $18 for a sixer. 

 

Im just kinda typing out loud right now. Following along at home. 

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On 12/7/2018 at 10:43 PM, Big Sarge said:

Hoppy strikes again, comes out from under his rock every 27 1/2 weeks or so. 

How the hell are ya?

Doing good Sarge! Just working all the time from my so called promotion! Lol! Thought finally I earned the respect from 33 years in the industry! Nope! Lol! Finally getting to brew some beer now!!!

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havent bought mr beer kits in about 3 years.. yes, cheaper than buying craft beer by the bottle ready made, but cost per gallon at least for me was less practical than doing a 5 gallon batch. a 5 gallon all grain cream ale can be done for about 28 bux...   53 bottles of beer for 28 dollars. thats about $4 a 6 pack? i think. sales are always good.

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Two sides to every story (perhaps three or four). If someone likes a particular beer, so let it be. Brewing MB recipes may be a learning process in two ways. First, learning to brew. Secondly, a sophistication of the taste buds and learning to appreciate more flavorful styles of beer. RickBeer  is correct, AB InBev may control much of the market, but hey I like some of those beers anyway. I've grown since my college days drinking Rolling Rock, but still drink a couple every now and then. BTW -just thought that I would add that I graduated college in 1979 - long before Rolling Rock was bought out. 

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1 hour ago, Brian N. said:

Two sides to every story (perhaps three or four).

 

I was once told that if you put 20 economy experts in a room and asked them one question, you would get 25  different answers.  :-)

 

I will again apologize to the OP, @Lionfan67.  I didn't mean to insult this person.  I was hoping to point out that brewing classic American lagers isn't easy, it's not something that can be done with Mr. Beer's recipes, and most home brewer are in the hobby for craft style beers.

 

If you would forgive us, @Lionfan67, we would be happy to help you with starting a hobby of brewing beer.  Understand that something like Miller Lite won't be something you will brew your first year, but with practice, you can brew some tasty beers.  You might even enjoy different flavors and styles of beers, and sharing them with your friends could start a friendly competition amongst you that could grow.  Classic American Lagers are cheapest bought in the store.  Craft beers outside that style are easy to make on your own, and something you be proud of.

 

MY

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