Jump to content
Mr.Beer Community

All Activity

This stream auto-updates     

  1. Today
  2. Here in Texas, Martin House have created a beer called Puppy Chow and it is amazing! To my mouth anyway. On the can it says "Stout with powered sugar, chocolate, peanut butter and chex". It's an 8%ABV, dark and thick. How would I even start to brew one of these myself?
  3. Last week
  4. Looking something like this. Don’t disagree, i already ordered the ingredients.
  5. I agree with all decisions that make beer! Otherwise, I'm no help. Sounds solid. I would love to vote for the pale ale, but I think the hops take a backseat to the malt with your choice of a golden ale.
  6. Anyone agree or disagree with this decision. Golden ale would be tradition for bittering, centennial, and EKG later on. Liberty bell yeast. otherwise dont tempt me with a pale ale. Or saison!
  7. After. I rarely cold crash, so when I do I just let the bottles sit for a few hours before wiping them down and slapping the labels on.
  8. Yall put your labels on before or after filling? Yours are probably room temp if you dont cold crash though so theres no sweat on the bottle
  9. A friend once shipped me some kits and one was an excellent golden ale. Perhaps that will be the ticket
  10. Earlier
  11. the key to this recipe is to try to replicate a beer. It was a wheat beer aged in a tequila barrel. The flavor of agave was amazing. I need to research the ABV and IBU of it, to make sure I don't go overboard on either one.
  12. Why not https://www.mrbeer.com/thomas-coopers-preacher-s-hefe-wheat-refill-pack alone in your LBK, or https://www.mrbeer.com/wild-wheat-recipe with a sachet of US-06? Personally, I'd either try the wild wheat route first.or substitute a Canadian Blonde HME for the CAL. From the description it doesn't sound like it would need the steeping grains of the Lock Stock and Barrel. This is probably a @Nickfixit question.
  13. Welcome back Hoppy. Nice job hijacking @MiniYoda's post 😃.
  14. Rick's short term memory is not good concerning Wolverine football.
  15. WOW. Just WOW. Can anyone tell me if the Big 10 has cancelled football this year? I'd ask Rick, but he probably doesn't remember what that is.
  16. American Blonde Ale? I keep coming back to session beers that are easy to brew...
  17. Disclaimer: I have a classic style bias. We need input from others that have the imagination to come up with an innovative, creative recipe. Like @Creeps McLane said, we don't want this beer to be boring!
  18. Other than being lager-based and a little more effort, it just seems that an amber Kellerbier would be a good match for my 'continental' home-malt. Order some Spalt hops, Mangrove Jack's M76, and you're good-to-go! From the BJCP: A very common seasonal summer beer brewed by many of the Munich area breweries and served in the beer gardens, where they are very popular. Overall Impression: A young, fresh Helles, so while still a malty, fully-attenuated Pils malt showcase, the hop character (aroma, flavor and bitterness) is more pronounced, and the beer is cloudy, often with some level of diacetyl, and possibly has some green apple and/or other yeast-derived notes. As with the traditional Helles, the Keller version is still a beer intended to be drunk by the liter, so overall it should remain a light, refreshing, easy drinking golden lager. Aroma: Reflects base style. Typically has additional yeast character, with byproducts not frequently found in well-lagered German beers (such as diacetyl, sulfur, and acetaldehyde). Appearance: Reflects base style. Typically can be somewhat hazy or cloudy, and likely a little darker in appearance than the base style. Flavor: Reflects base style. Typically has additional yeast character, with some byproducts not frequently found in well-lagered German beers (such as diacetyl, sulfur, and acetaldehyde), although not at objectionable levels. Mouthfeel: Reflects base style. Has a bit more body and creamy texture due to yeast in suspension, and may have a slight slickness if diacetyl is present. May have a lower carbonation than the base style. Comments: Young, unfiltered, unpasteurized versions of the traditional German beer styles, traditionally served on tap from the lagering vessel. The name literally means “cellar beer” – implying a beer served straight from the lagering cellar. Since this serving method can be applied to a wide range of beers, the style is somewhat hard to pin down. However, there are several common variants that can be described and used as templates for other versions. Sometimes described as Naturtrüb or naturally cloudy. Also sometimes called Zwickelbier, after the name of the tap used to sample from a lagering tank. History: Originally, Kellerbier referred to any Lager beer being matured in the caves or cellars under the brewery. In the 19th century, Kellerbier was a strong, aged beer meant to last the summer (Sommerbier), stored in rock cellars and served straight from them. But when refrigeration began to be used, the term shifted to describing special beers that were served young, directly from the cellar or lagering vessel. Today some breweries use the term purely for marketing purposes to make their beers appear special. While a kellerbier is sometimes considered more of a serving style than a beer style, the serving technique is still predominately used with certain styles in certain regions (such as Helles around the Munich area, or a Märzen in the Franconia region). Entry Instructions: The entrant must specify whether the entry is a Pale Kellerbier (based on Helles) or an Amber Kellerbier (based on Märzen). The entrant may specify another type of Kellerbier based on other base styles such as Pils, Bock, Schwarzbier, but should supply a style description for judges. Kellerbier: Pale Kellerbier A very common seasonal summer beer brewed by many of the Munich area breweries and served in the beer gardens, where they are very popular. Overall Impression: A young, fresh Helles, so while still a malty, fully-attenuated Pils malt showcase, the hop character (aroma, flavor and bitterness) is more pronounced, and the beer is cloudy, often with some level of diacetyl, and possibly has some green apple and/or other yeast-derived notes. As with the traditional Helles, the Keller version is still a beer intended to be drunk by the liter, so overall it should remain a light, refreshing, easy drinking golden lager. Aroma: Moderately-low to moderately-high spicy, floral, or herbal hop aroma. Very low to moderate diacetyl, possible very low green apple or other yeast derived notes. Pleasantly grainy-sweet, clean malt aroma, with possible low background note of DMS. Appearance: Slight haze to moderately cloudy, but never extremely cloudy or murky. Medium yellow to pale gold color. Creamy white head with good persistence. When served on cask, can have low carbonation and very low head. Flavor: Moderately malty with a rounded, grainy-sweet profile. Low to moderately-high spicy, floral, or herbal hop flavor, with a moderate hop bitterness that can linger. Finish is crisp and dry, but the aftertaste remains malty. Very low to moderate diacetyl, which should always remain at a pleasant, drinkable level that balances somewhat with the other characteristics of the beer; overwhelming diacetyl is not appropriate. Possible very low green apple or other yeast derived notes, and possible low background note of DMS. Mouthfeel: Medium body. Low to medium carbonation. Depending on the level of yeast in suspension, it may assist in creating a slightly creamy texture. A slight slickness on the tongue may be present from the diacetyl. Comments: Most Pale Kellerbiers are young, unfiltered, unpasteurized versions of Munich Helles beer, although Pils or a different, custom golden lager beer designed specifically for serving young could also be used. The best examples are served only on tap at many of the Munich area breweries. Bottled versions are not likely to have the freshness, hop character and young beer notes exhibited by the draft versions. History: Modern adaptation from the traditional Franconian style, using Helles instead of Märzen. Today, a popular summer seasonal beer. Characteristic Ingredients: Pilsner malt, German hops, German lager yeast; same as a Munich Helles. Style Comparison: Most commonly, a young, unfiltered and unpasteurized version of a Munich Helles, though it can be a young, unfiltered and unpasteurized version of other golden German lagers, such as a Pilsner or a seasonal golden lager made specifically for serving young. Vital Statistics: OG: 1.045 – 1.051 IBUs: 20 – 35 FG: 1.008 – 1.012 SRM: 3 –7 ABV: 4.7 – 5.4% Commercial Examples: (local) Paulaner, Paulaner Brauhaus, Hofbrau, Tegernseer Tal. (bottled) Ayinger Kellerbier, Hacker-Pschorr Munchner Kellerbier Anno 1417, Hofbrau Munchner Sommer Naturtrub, Wolnzacher Hell Naturtrüb Tags: standard-strength, pale-color, bottom-fermented, central-europe, traditional-style, balanced, pale-lager-family Kellerbier: Amber Kellerbier The original style of Kellerbier from the Franconia area of Germany. A much older style compared to the relatively more recent pale Helles-Style Kellerbier that is popular in the Munich area today. Overall Impression: A young, unfiltered, and unpasteurized beer that is between a Helles and Märzen in color, spicier in the hops with greater attenuation. Interpretations range in color and balance, but remain in the drinkable 4.8% ABV neighborhood. Balance ranges from the dry, spicy and pale-colored interpretations by St. Georgen and Löwenbräu of Buttenheim, to darker and maltier interpretations in the Fränkische Schweiz. This style is above all a method of producing simple drinkable beers for neighbors out of local ingredients to be served fresh. Balance with a focus on drinkability and digestibility is important. Aroma: Moderate intensity of German malt, typically rich, bready, somewhat toasty, with light bread crust notes. Moderately-low to moderate spicy peppery hop aroma. Very low to low diacetyl, occasionally low to moderately-low sulfur and very low green apple or other yeast-derived notes. Caramel, biscuity, or roasted malt aroma is inappropriate. Appearance: Moderately cloudy to clear depending on age, but never extremely cloudy or murky. Gold to deep reddish-amber color. Off-white, creamy head. When served on cask, can have low carbonation and very low head. Flavor: Initial malt flavor may suggest sweetness, but finish is moderately dry to dry, and slightly bitter. Distinctive and complex maltiness often includes a bready-toasty aspect. Hop bitterness is moderate to moderately high, and spicy or herbal hop flavor is low to moderately high. Balance can be either on the malt or hop side, but the finish is not sweet. Noticeable caramel or roasted malt flavors are inappropriate. Very low to low diacetyl. Possible very low green apple or other yeast-derived notes. Smooth, malty aftertaste. Mouthfeel: Medium body, with a creamy texture and medium carbonation. Fully fermented, without a sweet or cloying impression. Comments: The best examples of Amber Kellerbier are served only on tap at many of the small Franconia area breweries (as this is a beer best served fresh and the serving style being an important part of the style). Bottled versions are not likely to have the freshness, hop character and young beer notes exhibited by the draft versions. History: This was the classic, historical style before it was adapted in other areas. This original, older style of Kellerbier would have simply been beer served from local taverns that did not lager long enough to drop bright. Many breweries in Franconia would use some of this young beer during the summer months, for festivals such as the Annafest (est. 1840) in July in Forchheim, where it was traditional to drink directly from the lagering vessels. Characteristic Ingredients: Grist varies, although traditional German versions emphasized Franconian pale and color malt. The notion of elegance is derived from the high-quality local ingredients, particularly the malts. Spalt or other typically spicy local hops are most common. Frugal Franconian brewers rarely used decoction brewing due to the cost of energy. Style Comparison: Most commonly, this style is a young, unfiltered, unpasteurized, hoppier version of Munich Helles or Märzen. Fränkische Schweiz versions can edge up to dark amber or brown. Vital Statistics: OG: 1.048 – 1.054 IBUs: 25 – 40 FG: 1.012 – 1.016 SRM: 7 – 17 ABV: 4.8 – 5.4% Commercial Examples: (local) Greif, Eichhorn, Nederkeller, Hebendanz (bottled) Buttenheimer Kaiserdom Kellerbier, Kulmbacher Monchshof Kellerbier, Leikeim Kellerbier, Löwenbräu Kellerbier, Mahr’s Kellerbier, St. Georgen Kellerbier, Tucher Kellerbier Naturtrub Tags: standard-strength, amber-color, bottom-fermenting, central-europe, traditional-style, balanced, amber-lager-family
  19. i like roggenkellerbier. something about Keller. I think i have been to that Texas town before? LOL
  20. I was also thinking roggenkellerbier. First thing that popped in my mind. Or a roggendunkelweizen international pale lager ale. I win
  21. Maybe a Kölsch? Saison w/rye? Biere de Garde? Roggenkellerbier perhaps?
  22. You could either go for a clean bittering hop or I'd always recommend one of the noble hops for taking a backseat to the malt.
  23. I guess im down for anything. I want a light bodied, flavorful beer that showcases the malt. But nothing boring. Champagne taste...
  24. Are you looking to lightly hop with a noble hop?
  25. 9 lbs pale, 1 lb rye... haven’t decided. Id like to be lowly hopped to let the malt shine through. anyone got suggestions?
  26. Those numbers should get you close, somewhere between Pilsner and Pale malt.... Got a style in mind?
  27. So @Bonsai & Brew run this by me again. What did your tests show on the stats of this grain. 1.037 extract potential and 4 srm? I could look it up but its funner this way
  1. Load more activity
×
×
  • Create New...