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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/07/2019 in all areas

  1. 4 points
    OK. You've brewed a couple dozen MrB recipes. Good. If you want to learn the science find a copy of John Palmer's book. If you want to make the magic happen, we can help you do that. Malt extracts are made by allowing barley to begin germination and heating it to stop the growth and to dry it out. How they heat it, how hot they heat it, and how long affects the color, the taste and it's ability to convert starch into sugars. There are many sources available online which will explain the processes in detail. For a self education course you only need a few ounces of a base grain such as 2 row, Maris Otter, Pilsner, etc. MrBeer sell them in small quantities for additions to their recipes. The process from there is quite simple actually. If you have a large pyrex measuring cup heat 2 cups of water to 160 degrees. Add the grain to the water in the measuring cup and stir it to wet all of the grains. The next step is the hard part, you wait. After 10 minutes stir the grain and water again with an ordinary teaspoon. Taste a spoonful. Wait 10 more minutes and repeat. What you should experience is an amazing transformation. As time passes, the water will begin to taste sweeter. The malted barley contains enzymes which convert the starches in the barley seeds into sugars. The brewer controls the temperature of his mash to create the types of sugar. At temperatures near 160 degrees the sugars being created are typically not consumed by most brewers yeasts. These sugars give the brewed beer texture (I tell people to think of how whole milk feels in their mouth). At temperatures around 145 degrees most of the sugars created are easily consumed by yeast. The resulting beer will be drier (Think of how skim milk feels in your mouth). Most recipes typically call for the water to be held at 152 degrees to create a balance. The end result is wort similar to what you have with malt extracts. Simply stated malt extracts are dehydrated wort. This is an oversimplification but it's enough to get you started down the path to having a more thorough understanding of brewing.
  2. 2 points
    LME and DME are made from grain, so they comply with Reinheitsgebot. Mr. Beer HMEs contain LME, and hops, and complies. Beer uses yeast (definitional). There is nothing about brewing a Mr. Beer can of HME that is not compliant. Some Mr. Beer recipes add adjuncts, those would not be compliant. Unclear if OP wants to comply with Reinheitsgebot, or simply brew all grain.
  3. 1 point
    I'm on the "if it ain't broke, don't fix it" band wagon. I've been doing the 3 weeks fermentation/4 week carbonation, 3 days cold crash. My beer has been turning out very good. I would be afraid to change my process now.
  4. 1 point
    Great weekend! I was very proud that I have been able to create some really good beer. We went camping this weekend and I brought 3 of my brews along to enjoy while relaxing at the river. My brother in law asked if he could try one. Of course he could! After a bottle of Octoberfest and a bottle of American light, he decided that these were the best beers he'd ever tried! He asked if I would brew him a case! That made my whole weekend! It's great when you brew a batch that turns out really good. But then when someone asks you to make some for them, that really makes you feel good!
  5. 1 point
    Carbonating in bottles happens because the yeast remaining in the beer from fermentation eats sugar you add, and because the bottle is sealed. The amount of sugar added - table sugar, LME, DME, honey... - is insignificant. Given you are not focused on being Reinheitsgebot crazy, simply use table sugar as with Mr. Beer. I also highly recommend you get a CURRENT copy of Palmer's book, the free online version is over 20 years old and obsolete. My library has many brewing books.
  6. 1 point
    Two things come to mind: 1) Contact MRB and ask them which HMEs conform. Brew it. Done. Or 2) Do an all-grain batch. You can probably find hundreds of recipes online. Most will be for a five-gallon batch so you'd need to scale it down to two. As a side note, barley is what's used to make most LME/DME.
  7. 1 point
    They sell less kits if they say it takes longer. It would be disappointing if they are changing the instructions to specify less time, but not surprising. I suspect business is off considerably from what it was a few years ago.
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