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Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/07/2019 in all areas

  1. 4 points
    Write down everything. Write down everything. Write down everything. 😀
  2. 4 points
    I remember last year, one day i walked out in the yard and it smelled like woodstock 1969. Thats when i knew they were ready. I havent had that with this years crop but i havent been over by them twice a day, staring, shining a flashlight at night, telling them bed time stories like i did last year. Im either gonna use gulo ale yeast, saisonsteins monster or 05 if i have it. Gulo would be nice, that stuff cranks out a beer in days. I input the recipe in beersmith, i figured 3 oz of each hop at 30 minutes would be good. Im at 92 ibus. I hope thats not accurate
  3. 2 points
    CORRECTION! : I started with 32 cups (2 gallons). After the boil I was left with 18 cups, for a loss of 14 cups. So for 1 gallon I will lose 7 cups, or about .4 of a gallon per hour. Now the figures in BIAB Calculator are almost exactly what @Creeps McLane provided. Almost to the very numbers.
  4. 2 points
    I'm thinking Pre-Prohibition American Pale Ale -- Rahr 6-row, flaked corn, a little Crystal and fermenting with K-97. I grabbed a couple hop cones, checked out their lupulin and am picking up on some herbal notes, a hint of light sage, and some resiny aromas. This will be interesting...
  5. 1 point
    it can also depend on how strong your boil is. my kitchen stove vs. my turkey fryer burner are 2 different outcomes potentially.
  6. 1 point
    1st of all, if @Creeps McLane told you something, you can take that to the bank! LOL. I believe that the default in BS is .5 gallons per hour for the boil off rate. I would argue that mine is higher, so I agree with you. sounds right. I usually start off with almost 5 gallons (4.7) and struggle to get 4 gallons into my fermenter....trying to leave some of the hop sludge behind.
  7. 1 point
    @StretchNM buy 1 year of beersmith. you'll be hooked! write everything down in the notes tab on BS.
  8. 1 point
  9. 1 point
    Beersmith costs money. Its super nice if you plan on brewing AG. After a few batches you input your systems figures and then you never have to woory about it again. I dont measure anything anymore, the program does is all for me
  10. 1 point
    I find this easy to use - http://www.biabcalculator.com/ I found my rates different. Instead of 1.25 gallons per hour boiloff, I get 0.7, probably due to my stove not being as hot as a big propane flame. I also find my grain absorption to be different, instead of .045 gallons per pound, I use .075 gallons per pound. Of course, without exact measurements one doesn't know whether it's boil off, or absorption, but I seem to now routinely get 3.45 gallons pre-boil and around 2.6 - 2.75 gallons post boil, with 2.5 gallons going into the LBK. I found I needed to double crush my grains, and change QBrew's efficiency from 75% to 65%. I don't sparge at all, but I do squeeze.
  11. 1 point
    Mash water + displacement of grains lets you know your volume which would let you know how full your kettle is gonna be. Youll lose water absorbing into the grains so you should be left with 1.6 when you lift out your bag and give it a slight squeeze. If you want to have 1 gallon at bottling then you’ll need the lbk. Assuming a slight loss to trub in the glass carboy youll end up with maybe 0.8ish gallons at bottling. Beersmith assumes a boil off rate. Thats dependant on your kettle and vigor of boil. I triple the assumed loss with my set up which includes loss in the lines and pump. I put the hops for your recipe at 60 minutes just because you really didnt say what you intended to do for a hopping schedule. Stupid question but your grains are milled right?
  12. 1 point
    @StretchNM Using beersmith stove top mini biab, batch size changed to 1 gallon, mash profile of biab medium body (obviously no sparge) OG: 1.057 FG: 1.014 ABV: 5.7% SRM: 7 IBU: 40 mash water: 1.76 Volume needed: 1.94 preboil: 1.6 post boil: 1.3 into fermenter: 1.3 bottling / trub loss: 0.3 bottling volume: 1
  13. 1 point
    Whatcha planning there bud? Im gonna go with mostly golden promise, a touch of oats, rye and munich
  14. 1 point
    This Saturday itll be me and a big kettle of wort and hops getting picked straight from the bine continuously for the duration of the boil. Question is, do i make 10 or 15 gallons? No idea how potent my hops are but theres quite a few of them to be picked.
  15. 1 point
    This is definitely true. My brewery only brews Belgian styles and we step mash every recipe, but 1 (our Belgian style IPA). Most recipes go through 2 rests, but our wit has 3 rests. Step mashing is also very beneficial when brewing single malt beers because it adds complexity and depth to the base grain you're using. Step mashing basically utilizes different enzymes to break down different starches into sugars. Single infusion mash beers are only utilizing 1 enzyme because the other enzymes were destroyed above certain temps. But by stepping your mash at different temps for different time periods, you are utilizing more types of enzymes, which also results in better mash efficiency and better attenuation in the end.
  16. 1 point
    I'm still brewing mash-in-sack on the stovetop and have been doing step-mashes per your link to the Devil's Backbone mash schedule posted some months ago -- 20 min. at 136 F, 20 min. at 148, and 20 min. at 158 F. I don't know that it's made a noticeable difference in my all-grain recipes but I do enjoy the challenge of trying to hit those stops.🍻
  17. 1 point
    "The delicious Belgian malt flavor profile comes more from the rests in the mashing than from special, difficult to source, expensive malts." hmmm.....🤔
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