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Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/10/2019 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    I agree. I brewed 10 gallons this weekend, 5 gallons AG wouldve taken just as much time, 2 gallons wouldve taken just as much time. Brew more now so you dont have to brew later. Split yeasts, add fruit, experiment and youll learn twice as fast
  2. 2 points
    @StretchNM if you don't mind me asking, why do you want to brew 1 gallon batches? to each his own, but it's no more effort to fill up your LBK (2 gallons) and have more beer.to drink. especially if you really like it....know what i mean? i used to think that the LBK was way too much beer, and now I'm questioning the concept of 4 gallons. go figure.
  3. 1 point
    I'd suggest that in the future you sit down and plan what you want to do. For example, brew a 2.5 gallon batch in an LBK (which will hold 2.5 gallons just fine). Or a 2 gallon batch. Then find a recipe that you like online (there are thousands of extract recipes), convert it to the size you're going to brew, come up with a list of ingredients, and then go buy the ingredients (or order online). I come up with my recipes and the list of ingredients, and because my store is online also I cost them out. I then go and pull my grains for recipe #1, crush them, and seal the bag, labeling it. Then I go do #2. And so on. When I check out, if the bill is different I have them review what they entered wrong... Just buying stuff while at a store is backwards.
  4. 1 point
    I agree with you both, @Jdub and @Creeps McLane. Sometimes I don't think straight, so when I bought the grain at the supply store, well, that was one of those times. I was just browsing and marveling and slobbering around at that place that it was a spur of the moment idea. I was thinking that first 1-gallon batch tasted so good ("thin" though it was) 'what if I duplicated it but added this much grain and that much of that'. I should have got maybe 4 pounds of 2-Row with 6oz of Crystal 40 or something, and just tried that for 2 full gallons. I really want to get a 7 gallon bucket at ritebrew and brew some larger batches, I just haven't pulled the trigger yet. (Oh but I did order and receive a new LBK a while back, so now I could do 4 gallons. It's standing by like a good soldier, all shined up and ready when I want it)
  5. 1 point
    Don't overthink it @StretchNM! You boil your 2 gallons for an hour and it cools and you have 1.5 gal left then your boil off rate is .5 gal per hour. Now that you have that approx. rate per hour then next time you want to make a recipe that requires an hour boiling grains, LME, whatever then you know that you need to add an extra .5 gal to your kettle to compensate the loss. You can always boil longer if you over compensated, or if you find that you boiled off too much you can add some water back. I find it handy in Beersmith to check my gravity post boil before I pump into the fermenter. Beersmith will usually say something like my post boil should be 1.046 and so if I find that I'm at 1.033 I might dissolve a .5-.75 lb of LME into the kettle and take another read before pumping into the fermenter. Of course if I'm on the money with BS or slightly above the post boil gravity I have no worry and proceed to pumping into the fermenter. At least use Qbrew to fill in those blanks if you're not using BS yet. Qbrew will be pretty close with you losses to boil off , hop additions, and trub loss.
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