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Showing content with the highest reputation since 07/02/2019 in Posts

  1. 7 points
    Write down everything. Write down everything. Write down everything. 😀
  2. 6 points
    Gentlemen, This mead recently received a bronze medal at a competition. Ciders and meads were combined in the category and it was the only mead to medal.
  3. 6 points
  4. 5 points
    And with that, brewing at Copper State with my Dad is scheduled! Super excited. Probably wont even hit me until im walking in.
  5. 5 points
    I have the grains for a chocolate ale waiting, perhaps trying to squeeze in a brew day on Sunday. It's going to be a busy weekend, though. I first have to find time to transfer the oatmeal stout to the secondary because I want to dry bean some coffee. And I need the fermenter.
  6. 5 points
    my wda is a success. i bottled on tuesday 11/12 after cold crashing for 3 days. filled 10 750ml bottles and i had about 8 oz left over. it had a great taste. i'll try the trub bottle after 4 weeks. thanks for all the help folks, i was close to tossing this batch.
  7. 5 points
    Boy i tell you, this week... unexpected $800 car bill, my toilet is clogged, we got put on mandatory overtime, ITS WINTER ALL OF A SUDDEN. All these things dragging me down. But then the ups man shows up with an early xmas present from a friend and theres two beer kits in the box. Things are looking up
  8. 5 points
    Brewed my FREE MB WDA yesterday (expiration Nov 2019). What a monster fermentation after just 24 hours. Looking forward to a really yummy beer. Have not brewed in a few months, but now is the season!
  9. 5 points
    I ran across this 2017 Mr Beer article and while there are many hops not on this list, it's a great reference list that might help tickle your thought process when choosing your hops whether your brewing extract or AG. https://www.mrbeer.com/blog/post/aroma-hops-bittering-hops-dual-purpose-hops
  10. 5 points
    This is definitely true. My brewery only brews Belgian styles and we step mash every recipe, but 1 (our Belgian style IPA). Most recipes go through 2 rests, but our wit has 3 rests. Step mashing is also very beneficial when brewing single malt beers because it adds complexity and depth to the base grain you're using. Step mashing basically utilizes different enzymes to break down different starches into sugars. Single infusion mash beers are only utilizing 1 enzyme because the other enzymes were destroyed above certain temps. But by stepping your mash at different temps for different time periods, you are utilizing more types of enzymes, which also results in better mash efficiency and better attenuation in the end.
  11. 5 points
    Making this beer this weekend. Sub extract for 4lbs wheat and 4lbs pilsner. Also sub hallertau for liberty. The LHBS was out. Never used this yeast before, i have always used omegas hefe yeast in the past.
  12. 5 points
    I'm on the "if it ain't broke, don't fix it" band wagon. I've been doing the 3 weeks fermentation/4 week carbonation, 3 days cold crash. My beer has been turning out very good. I would be afraid to change my process now.
  13. 4 points
    Thinking about a double brew day today. I have all the ingredients for a recipe I stole from @Jdub. It was gonna be called “jackin jdub“ but I quickly realized that was the worst possible name ever. Also, “Jackin Jesters” got changed to “Jester King Yeast”. In my language jacking means stealing but I believe theres a second meaning out there also. anywho, the vienna lager isnt doing the greatest in competition so Im not going to waste my money sending that to NHC.
  14. 4 points
    planning on brewing an APA in the morning. should be good weather. the only obstacle will be the wife and potential honey do's since i'm off tomorrow. #homebrewproblems
  15. 4 points
    Ordered some grains and yeast today after finalizing my recipe for "Wiscohops." I ordered from MHBS this morning and they shipped this afternoon and will be delivered tomorrow afternoon! @Creeps McLane I did drop the wheat from my recipe and tweaked the hops and SRM in BS a tad. I know it's likely to be a bit or a lot different from "Hopulation", but that's okay. It'll still be a Pale Ale and a fun recipe.
  16. 4 points
    have a Community Yessir Pale Ale clone ready to brew. all the grains, hops...etc. I love the beer, and it's seasonal, so I can't get it right now, so I e-mailed the brewmaster and he e-mailed me right back! gave me everything except for the most important part, the hop schedule. having to guess on that. oh well, i will make beer! wish i had time to brew right now. damn work!
  17. 4 points
    I just ordered all the grains for the second vienna lager fire brick clone. Last batch was may sweeter. I am using different yeast but i know its because of my mashing technique. I got er under control now, hopefully. Well see when i can sneak this beer in
  18. 4 points
    He'll answer you...in six months.
  19. 4 points
    Well my queue consists of my next PA. However, I have fleshed out the recipe and have a name for it. BOOTY CALL. Heck I even have some label art to go with it. After that well I did buy some NZ hops called Rakau, so another PA at some point will feature those, and a name too. Rakau Rumble. My queue for the moment.
  20. 4 points
    I was thinking to myself today "cant you sneak in a brew day during the week? I mean the pipeline is awfully low". So I said, Self, that's a damn good idea. Went home, drew up a recipe fpr a simple 5 gallon BIAB. Prepare tomorrow, Brew on Wednesday. Well, then my phone buzzed and an event was added to the family calendar. Apparently my wife will be with my sister tomorrow night, kids will be at my parents so of course Ill be brewing tomorrow. Salts are measured, kettle is clean, grains are milled, should be set. Oh hell yeah!!!
  21. 4 points
    I remember last year, one day i walked out in the yard and it smelled like woodstock 1969. Thats when i knew they were ready. I havent had that with this years crop but i havent been over by them twice a day, staring, shining a flashlight at night, telling them bed time stories like i did last year. Im either gonna use gulo ale yeast, saisonsteins monster or 05 if i have it. Gulo would be nice, that stuff cranks out a beer in days. I input the recipe in beersmith, i figured 3 oz of each hop at 30 minutes would be good. Im at 92 ibus. I hope thats not accurate
  22. 4 points
    This Saturday itll be me and a big kettle of wort and hops getting picked straight from the bine continuously for the duration of the boil. Question is, do i make 10 or 15 gallons? No idea how potent my hops are but theres quite a few of them to be picked.
  23. 4 points
    I want smell-o'vision so bad!!!
  24. 4 points
    2nd year crop of an unknown cultivar. Yes, they are growing on my downspout and yes, they are gonna get brewed!🍻
  25. 4 points
    Ordered Pilsen, Maris Otter, Carapils, Nottingham yeast, and 5 or 6 different hops. Falconers Flight for a LBK of Witches Flight with some PM tweaks, and then some Willamete, Fuggles, EKG, and Styrian Celia for my attempt at St. Austells Tribute Pale Ale. For some reason I ordered some Galaxy hops with no recipe in hand but will figure out something. After that I think I'll make a 4-5 gal batch of Altbier just to keep a better stock amount than what I brewed for the German Stein comp. Still pretty hot for the AG brewing in the garage but I'm going to have to just deal with it.
  26. 4 points
    not brewing till next weekend, but went to LHBS today and got the parts for a 4 gallon batch of all grain Hopslam clone. lots of hops bought today.
  27. 4 points
    The last time I shipped beer, im guessing the hazys exploded. UPS notified me there was damage, discarded the exploded beers, and packaged up the ones that were still good and shipped them back to me. Also included was a report and several tips on how to safely package beer. Its 2019, i dont think they care anymore
  28. 4 points
    You must ship via ups or fed ex. Tell them nothing, they shouldn’t even ask. package at home. Ship to a business if possible. Youll save money that way wrap the bottles well in bubble wrap and then stick 1-2 in gallon ziplocks, whatever will fit line the whole box with a trash bag as leakage insurance tape it up real well. Especially the bottom avoid shipping yeasty beer in the summer
  29. 4 points
    Agreed 100%. Reinheitsgebot was implemented with only three ingredients in mind - water, barley, and hops. Yeast was yet to be discovered 500 years ago, yet we now know there are many varieties of them and how much they impact beer. So to be in compliance with the original law, you'd have to brew a lambic. But other than "because I want to make a 'pure' beer", what reason is there to comply with Reinheitsgebot? Why does the definition of "purity" as assigned to beer by some 16th Century minor Bavarian government bureaucrat matter? One of the three driving reasons behind the law was to ensure that grains more valuable for use in bread - mainly wheat and rye - weren't "wasted" brewing beer. So Reinheitsgebot can more accurately be viewed as a "Bread Preservation and Anti-Starvation Law" than as a "Beer Purity Law". Additionally, Reinheitsgebot was not just about "purity" of ingredients and protecting the grains used in bread. For some reason that seems to be the only part of the law ever discussed. But there were other parts of the law: the German government setting the price of beer... and far more importantly the taxation rate of beer. So Reinheitsgebot essentially was the government telling brewers "You can only use these particular ingredients because we want better grains to go to other uses, you can only charge this amount per beer, and this is the amount you'll be paying us to sell your beer." Plus, Reinheitsgebot is no guarantee of quality. I was fortunate enough to spend almost nine years living in Germany. There are many great beers that comply. There are many crap beers that also comply. There are many great beers that DON'T comply...and also crap beers that don't. Some German styles that don't comply with Reinheitsgebot, and the styles are world-renowned: Hefeweizen, Roggenbier, Gose, Dunkelweizen, and Berliner Weisse. IMNSHABHAO (In my not so humble and borderline haughtily arrogant opinion) and not trying to denigrate the OP's intent, complying with Reinheitsgebot is more about bragging than anything else. I look at it this way: Belgian brewers have been crafting absolutely amazing beers for centuries caring not a bit about "German purity laws".
  30. 4 points
    OK. You've brewed a couple dozen MrB recipes. Good. If you want to learn the science find a copy of John Palmer's book. If you want to make the magic happen, we can help you do that. Malt extracts are made by allowing barley to begin germination and heating it to stop the growth and to dry it out. How they heat it, how hot they heat it, and how long affects the color, the taste and it's ability to convert starch into sugars. There are many sources available online which will explain the processes in detail. For a self education course you only need a few ounces of a base grain such as 2 row, Maris Otter, Pilsner, etc. MrBeer sell them in small quantities for additions to their recipes. The process from there is quite simple actually. If you have a large pyrex measuring cup heat 2 cups of water to 160 degrees. Add the grain to the water in the measuring cup and stir it to wet all of the grains. The next step is the hard part, you wait. After 10 minutes stir the grain and water again with an ordinary teaspoon. Taste a spoonful. Wait 10 more minutes and repeat. What you should experience is an amazing transformation. As time passes, the water will begin to taste sweeter. The malted barley contains enzymes which convert the starches in the barley seeds into sugars. The brewer controls the temperature of his mash to create the types of sugar. At temperatures near 160 degrees the sugars being created are typically not consumed by most brewers yeasts. These sugars give the brewed beer texture (I tell people to think of how whole milk feels in their mouth). At temperatures around 145 degrees most of the sugars created are easily consumed by yeast. The resulting beer will be drier (Think of how skim milk feels in your mouth). Most recipes typically call for the water to be held at 152 degrees to create a balance. The end result is wort similar to what you have with malt extracts. Simply stated malt extracts are dehydrated wort. This is an oversimplification but it's enough to get you started down the path to having a more thorough understanding of brewing.
  31. 4 points
    Thank you for all your comments on here. To address a few: 1) Security concerns on Facebook are real so don't join if you are concerned at all. It OK. 2) Facebook is a totally different group than the forum here. There is no need to join if you prefer to be here. 3) Every business goes through staffing changes and we have had many people throughout the years. Our former brewmasters include Eric Green who started one of the best craft breweries in Arizona, Dragoon Brewery, Gene Sandoval started Blackrock Brewing, Pat Butler joined Dragoon Brewing, Sam Diggens joined Sentinel Brewing, and most recently we had Josh move up to Pinetop Brewing Co. Then we have others like Tim, Tyson and Renae that were here for a time and then were able to continue to grow themselves (millennials change jobs 4 times between 21 and 32 according to LinkedIn study). We continue to bring in new people with or without experience. Right now we have two current agents with over 25 years experience in brewing not counting the additional 65 years of experience with the other people in the office. 4) It may appear that Mr. Beer participation is lagging in the forum, but instead the amount of searches that go on just show that people are finding the answers that they need. Similar to what many of you have said, they dont go that next step and further participate. With almost a half a million posts, they will find their answer. We have had to adjust our way of communicating and now had more people participating in our support chat on our website more than anything else. This too could possibly take away from participation here. 5) The homebrewing business has changed drastically over the past decade. Interest grew dramatically up to 2012 then slowed, then in 2015 reverse and many people lost interest. The craft beer craze that we all enjoy has some to blame as we all can go to one of many close by craft breweries and enjoy what we once could only brew. 6) With more people working, there is less time to brew. There is almost a perfect correlation to the unemployment rate to the interest in "how to brew" google searches. Most businesses go through this cycle and it will come back around with more interest developing again in short order. When that does happen we will have this forum, Facebook, our site and continue to look at all options where people want to be contacted. This forum is not going anywhere soon. We will continue to upgrade and maintain. We will continue to engage when needed and point new brewers here to get their answers. Please continue to be the warm and engaging group that you all are.
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