Jump to content
Mr.Beer Community

Leaderboard


Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/23/2018 in Posts

  1. 12 points
    Brew #2 - MRB - 1776 Ale (ABV 4.2) Finally... a success! After losing to my first brew batch - MRB's American LAGER, I've got a winner. At least, to me it is! Not quite as carbonated as I'd like, and lacking in sustainable head, it's as sweet as I could have asked for. No sourness. No unpleasant aftertaste. Just a nice, sweet Ale. I can do this. I have one brew in the queue - an all-grain English Pale Ale. It should be just fine. We'll see. ON EDIT: Changed MRB's American Ale to MRB's American LAGER
  2. 11 points
    Thank you for all your comments on here. To address a few: 1) Security concerns on Facebook are real so don't join if you are concerned at all. It OK. 2) Facebook is a totally different group than the forum here. There is no need to join if you prefer to be here. 3) Every business goes through staffing changes and we have had many people throughout the years. Our former brewmasters include Eric Green who started one of the best craft breweries in Arizona, Dragoon Brewery, Gene Sandoval started Blackrock Brewing, Pat Butler joined Dragoon Brewing, Sam Diggens joined Sentinel Brewing, and most recently we had Josh move up to Pinetop Brewing Co. Then we have others like Tim, Tyson and Renae that were here for a time and then were able to continue to grow themselves (millennials change jobs 4 times between 21 and 32 according to LinkedIn study). We continue to bring in new people with or without experience. Right now we have two current agents with over 25 years experience in brewing not counting the additional 65 years of experience with the other people in the office. 4) It may appear that Mr. Beer participation is lagging in the forum, but instead the amount of searches that go on just show that people are finding the answers that they need. Similar to what many of you have said, they dont go that next step and further participate. With almost a half a million posts, they will find their answer. We have had to adjust our way of communicating and now had more people participating in our support chat on our website more than anything else. This too could possibly take away from participation here. 5) The homebrewing business has changed drastically over the past decade. Interest grew dramatically up to 2012 then slowed, then in 2015 reverse and many people lost interest. The craft beer craze that we all enjoy has some to blame as we all can go to one of many close by craft breweries and enjoy what we once could only brew. 6) With more people working, there is less time to brew. There is almost a perfect correlation to the unemployment rate to the interest in "how to brew" google searches. Most businesses go through this cycle and it will come back around with more interest developing again in short order. When that does happen we will have this forum, Facebook, our site and continue to look at all options where people want to be contacted. This forum is not going anywhere soon. We will continue to upgrade and maintain. We will continue to engage when needed and point new brewers here to get their answers. Please continue to be the warm and engaging group that you all are.
  3. 10 points
    Hello again Mr Sweat, Your second (tested) replacement, along with the 2 free refills that I promised, are set to be delivered tomorrow. Please message me here for tracking information. I'm sorry that this was insufficient in making up the inconvenience of the wait to you. I apologize also that my communication was insufficient. Tyson was trying to offer a faster solution, not weasel out of sending a replacement, and I'm sorry we created the impression otherwise. Other than having your second replacement tested (which I did) and including $50 of free stuff (which I did), I failed to consider any other ways I could have made it right. I would offer you a refund for the initial kit, had you purchased it from us directly. You are quite correct that our service was poor in this case, and I apologize for however my personal failures negatively impacted your view of this company. I wish you the best of luck in your brewing endeavor, regardless of where you get your supplies.
  4. 9 points
    My all-grain English Pale Ale 1-gallon Kit I brewed in March is ready. And the results of the first bottle are: Success! Wow, I can't believe I'm doing this. First goodness with the MRB 1776 and now Success with the no-name brand EPA. This beer is very pale, smooooth, hoppy, and well-carbonated. I'm a happy brewer right now. Thank you to all of you that helped out when I was doing this batch - @RickBeer, @Jdub, @BDawg62, @Nickfixit, @Shrike, @Bonsai & Brew, @D Kristof, and @StretchNM (that's me). Yes, I went through the old thread to find everybody who gave advice and encouragement. Thank you. Despite the sloppy instructions that came with the Kit, we made it work. Pretty dang cool. I would definitely brew this beer again. And again. I guess I'm going to have to break out my pilsner glass for this brew. I know, my logo and labeling needs work. But that's about as professional as I need to be ((( )))
  5. 9 points
    @MRB-Rick Thank you for your post. Knowing that our concerns are relevant to Mr. Beer and that you have addressed them is good for us all. Also the update to our perceived lack of participation in this forum is wonderful. Knowing that the questions that we have spent a lot of time answering are still providing help is awesome. Even though I no longer brew with Mr. Beer products, I use this forum to help those who like me are starting out their journey with Mr. Beer. I hope that somehow my answers and the answers of others here have kept some brewers in the hobby that would have left otherwise. Your post alone will make me continue to check this forum every day as I have always done. Prost, Dawg
  6. 9 points
    Jdub, thank you very much, my brewing hobby is renewed. Best beer I've made to date by far, and experiencing citra hops to the max. Below is your shared Zombie clone recipe.
  7. 8 points
    To everyone on this awsome group. Been brewing for a year now 15 beers in the bank. I read more than post but it has helped me and I learn more every day keep it up. I am officially addicted lol. 1 week till bottling. Then back at it again
  8. 8 points
    After seven weeks, my first taste. I love the color it turned out. The taste is ‘ok’ not as carbonated as I expected/hoped. Although this first bottle was a partial bottle since the batch didn’t come out exactly even. I noticed there was some undissolved goop in the bottom that was the same color as the carbonation drops. So the other bottles may turn out even better. All in all, I figure a pretty decent outcome for my first try. Cheers!
  9. 8 points
    Ya gotta figure they are over compensating yeah? Maybe its about the size of their.... batches. Who knows? You have this kinda thing with all sorts of groups of people like car guys, motorcycle guys, hell even camera dudes (I once sold a ton of prints of a pic I took of Garth at the Opry that I took with a cheapo-depot camera and I was called a liar when I showed my camera - that was 18 years ago and it still makes me laugh). Equipment don't make the man or in this case, beer. I often refer to Manfish as "Home brewer's on steroids". We don't have fancy equipment, that's for sure. No stainless steel conicals anywhere in the brewery. Yes, we have bigger equipment than most home brewers do, that is true. All that really means that without the knowledge of what to do to fill those properly, we would end up with bigger batches of garbage brew. I've said it many times, here, in real life, on Facebook and anywhere I get the chance... "There would be no Manfish Brewing if it weren't for Mr. Beer." A 100% correct statement. I had *NEVER* thought about brewing my own beer, ever, until I got that fateful Christmas gift in 2009. People can say whatever they want about Mr. Beer, most people don't like facts anyways, it only confuses them. #PROST!
  10. 8 points
    Unless the area the beer sloshed into was infected with mad cow disease, turburculocious or had some @HoppySmile! drool on it, youll be ok. I move stuff around all the time. I have to move a fermenter tonight too. A little bump wont hurt. Actually, some times i give my carboys a little shake if the hop particles are caught on the ridges. Don’t tell anyone else on here ok?
  11. 7 points
    Write down everything. Write down everything. Write down everything. 😀
  12. 7 points
    Here are some excellent tips for brewing and getting the result you want. I do not adhere to these to - my misfortune - I am attention deficit so try very different things each time (usually) (Sometimes I make multiple brews with very slight differences but not often.) Still, this is a good read. Also note the fermentation temperatures! https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/how-to-brew/4-trappist-brewing-tips-from-spencer-trappist-brewery/
  13. 7 points
    HOME BREW RECIPE: Title: Alaskan Amber Clone Author: Web+ modifications Brew Method: All Grain Style Name: American Amber Ale Boil Time: 60 min Batch Size: 5 gallons (fermentor volume) Boil Size: 6.5 gallons Boil Gravity: 1.043 Efficiency: 70% (brew house) STATS: Original Gravity: 1.056 Final Gravity: 1.013 ABV (standard): 5.69% IBU (tinseth): 35.3 SRM (morey): 10.59 Mash pH: 5.62 FERMENTABLES: 9 lb - Pale 2-Row (80%) 1 lb - Caramel / Crystal 10L (8.9%) 0.5 lb - Caramel / Crystal 120L (4.4%) 0.5 lb - Carapils (Dextrine Malt) (4.4%) 4 oz - Rice Hulls (2.2%) HOPS: 1 oz - Cascade, Type: Pellet, AA: 7, Use: Boil for 60 min, IBU: 28.29 1 oz - Saaz, Type: Pellet, AA: 3.5, Use: Boil for 15 min, IBU: 7.02 MASH GUIDELINES: 1) Sparge, Temp: 150 F, Time: 60 min Starting Mash Thickness: 1.6 qt/lb YEAST: White Labs - German Ale/ Kölsch Yeast WLP029 Starter: Yes Form: Liquid Attenuation (avg): 75% Flocculation: Medium Optimum Temp: 65 - 69 F Fermentation Temp: 65 F Pitch Rate: 0.35 (M cells / ml / deg P)
  14. 7 points
    I had a Mr Beer system years ago before Cooper bought them and for whatever reason just stopped brewing. I just got a new kit for Christmas with an Irish Stout refill. I just started the stout and am interested to see how it turns out. I am curious if it has changed with Cooper. Right off I can see that the brewing process itself is a little easier than it was such as having just two lines marked 1 and 2 instead of measurements and the carbonation drops are definitely an improvement over having to measure out sugar. I'll be interested to see if the beer is any different than I remember.
  15. 7 points
    Speaking of which, Forum Friends, they are coming. Let's greet them warmly and help them...no matter how many times the questions have been asked and answered. 😜 We were all newbies once. I don't know if I'd even still be brewing if it weren't for the great advice I found here.
  16. 7 points
    First beer brew in years. Today was brew day! Diablo IPA with US-05
  17. 7 points
    Actually, you can get a lot more advanced. All beer is fermented. Mr. Beer's LBK is a fermenter. Regardless of how you make your wort (can of HME, LME/DME with steeping grains and hops, Brew In A Bag, or all grain brewing in a big pot over a burner, wort is wort. There are some features that make a Mr. Beer LBK "unique" over some other fermenters: 1) The fermenter is made of plastic. That means you must cool the wort to a temperature that will not damage the plastic before pouring it in. Given that all brewing requires the wort to be cooled to a proper pitching temperature (which varies by type of yeast used), that's not a big deal. However, if I had a big metal fermenter, I could choose to put hot wort in it and then cool it down overnight before pitching. Can't do that with a Mr. Beer LBK. And gradual cooling gives the chance for infection. 2) The fermenter has no "blow off" device. This means if you have a very active fermentation, it can overflow out the lid vents and make a mess. Fancy fermenters have a blow off device that during active fermentation can send overflow into a bucket and keep things tidy. Once active fermentation is over, you replace the tube with an airlock. No airlock or tube with Mr. Beer, but it's not needed. 3) Like any fermenter, the Mr. Beer LBK is limited to it's capacity. Basically that's around 2.5 or 2.6 gallons. And if you fill it to the 2.6 mark, you'll probably get overflow. I put in 2.5 gallons regularly, ferment at 65 or lower, and rarely get overflow. I used to regularly make a 5 gallon batch of extract beer, and split it evenly between two LBKs. I now do BIAB, and due to stove limitations I make one 2.5 gallon batch each time. 4) Because it's a plastic fermenter, it can be damaged, either by cleaning improperly (scrubbing) or by a beer that gets a bacterial infection. If an LBK gets a bacterial infection (rare), it's possible that it can't be cleaned well enough to be used again without transmitting that infection. Same goes for a bottling bucket, or anything else plastic. That's why good sanitation is important. Any beer you brew can be fermented in an LBK.
  18. 7 points
    Most of those guys don't brew decent beer either. They tend to deflect to their equipment because their product does not speak for itself. In my experience in my brew club the guys more interested in equipment and who's is better don't bring beer to share and when they do it usually isn't that good. Those of us who concentrate conversations on processes are the base that bring beers to share and surprise, it is usually good beer. We also as a club support anybody that brews with Mr. Beer and try to help them through any issues. It is how I started and even though a lot will not admit it, they started the same way too.
  19. 7 points
    Beer has 4 components - grain, hops, yeast, water. You can vary any of them, many ways, and get many results. The more you change at once, the less you understand about why you got what you got, and your ability to recreate it in the future. I'd recommend you restrict your yeast choices unless there is a strong reason to change, instead focusing on the difference in different steeping grains, and different hops. For example, make several batches of one refill, say CAL, and use different hops to dry hop. Teaches you in a neutral beer what differences those hops make. Or, make a batch using a packet of light LME vs. a packet of robust LME. See if you can tell the difference in a blind test. See if you can taste the flavors you get. Learn how to properly evaluate a beer. I've been brewing for over 6 years. Here is the extensive list of yeast that I have used in that time: - Original (pre-Cooper's) Mr. Beer Yeast - Cooper's Mr. Beer Yeast - S-05 - S-04 - Nottingham - Windsor - Whatever came with one can I bought of another HME - A lager yeast for the one batch of lager I made Here is a list of the different water treatments I have tried: - My well water I know I've harped on this theme, and I'll continue to, because I think it's the best way for someone to learn, and I try to learn in everything I do.
  20. 6 points
    I'm down to my last few bottles of Shameless Stout that's been conditioning since September. I know it almost sounds cliche among us but this beer has gotten so much better with time! A solid stout to try if anyone has been debating.
  21. 6 points
  22. 6 points
    Some people say the number one rule in brewing is sanitation. I thinks its "know what youre doing, and why youre doing it" You technically don't know if your beer is done fermenting until you take a gravity reading. I would also add that you can do a fairly simple diacytel test at home to ensure the beer is ready to be packaged. If the beer is done at day 7 and also tastes good and passes the diacytel test, then its good to package. It will not harm it to go another week or even two. So, yes, another reading at day 14 is pointless. But remember, attenuation (average % of sugars a yeast will eat) is only an average. Two readings are needed to prove the yeast is done eating. Keep in mind some yeasts are notorious for stalling out at any point and may test the same for days before finishing the job. Im an honest man. I only kinda go by days fermenting. But Ive also been doing this for almost 6 years. Every beer ive ever made has produced a krausen of varying degrees. Some much more larger than others. I pitch yeast, ferment, krausen appers for days then it falls. when it falls, I raise the temp for a day or three until im ready to keg. Keep in mind I keg, It wont explode like bottles would if you aren't careful. I generally go no less than 14 days because I try to only do brewing things on the weekend. So 14 days fits right into my schedule. If I don't get to it, then ill go 21 days. Doesn't affect the beer in the slightest. Also remember that dry hopping kicks up another mini fermentation, so don't dry hop and then bottle immediately. Know what youre doing and why youre doing it. US-04 is usually a quick mover but if your krausen fell yesterday then its probably not ready. Temperature is a tool, and also a measurement in brewing. At 65 degrees things happen fast. At 35 they happen slow. At 75 they happen too fast for most ales. Don't cold crash until youre sure the beer is done because youll either a) get exploding bottles due to imcomplete fermentation or b) lock in undesirable flavors. Carb the beer for 4 weeks and then decide what you want to do from there. Cold storage will preserve flavors and keep beers fresh while keeping your stored bottles at 70 degrees will age them for the better or worse. Its been a long time since I posted any useful advice. That's why Im goin on a tangent
  23. 6 points
    creeps... beer has all the nutrient your body ever will need.they even named a vitamin after it.. vitamin B for Beer. no need to clutter it up with fruit. ive been drinking beer for ages and i'm in the best shape i've ever been in... round.
  24. 6 points
    Works like a charm for grain steeping and 60 min hop schedule boil. "Keep warm" button allows it to stay around 155 for steeping. "Saute" button set at the "more" level, allows a slow continuous boil. Found 3 slight variations of Zombie Dust clone, trying all three.
  25. 6 points
    Difference in new LBK is the spigot which also has a different size fitting hole ( :-/) but does come apart or cleaning ( 🙂 and the size of the top hole which makes cleaning easier. Mine though are also darker, making it very difficult to see the liquid levels - can't easily see liquid from outside or line from inside. Flashlight and tape markers help. I just (Sept) made a Diablo with the Mr B yeast. Good but I should have put some aroma hop in.
  26. 6 points
    1) You can't look at powder and analyze what it is. If you bought bulk powder, it should have a name, and then you know what you own. Laundry detergent looks the same also... 2) Mr. Beer's sanitizer can be stored, for a week, in an airtight container in the refrigerator. Then it needs to come to room temp to be used. If you just want to clean with it (not sanitize), then you could store it longer, but the oxygen content is gone at that point. 3) Sanitizing a hop sack, or a measuring cup, or such can be done with a pot of boiling water. Or a cup of boiling water in a microwave. 4) You should NOT store things with liquid sanitizer for periods of time. StarSan, an acid, will eat through things like chrome. 5) I use a batch of StarSan for several months, stored in a bucket with a lid. 6) Mr. Beer sanitizer, made at double strength, can in fact be used for cleaning. If you read the packet, it says "No-Rinse Cleanser". There are products that are similar to this, i.e. One Step and Easy Clean. LD Carlson, who makes Easy Clean, told me that it's the same as One Step, but can't be labeled as a sanitizer because they haven't gone through the process ($$$) to get it labeled as such. 7) The dishwasher can be used for sanitizing, but it's not recommended. Bottles don't get properly washed inside, and rinse agents aren't good for beer bottles. Utensils would be fine going through a sanitizing cycle, which is not the same as heated dry. You could also bake metal utensils in your oven to sanitize them. But that's all pretty silly, when dipping them in sanitizer is a one and done thing. I would not store anything for a period of time and then consider it sanitized.
  27. 6 points
    Lol, I'm on another forum occasionally and for sure there is a segment of AG guys that are all about my equipment is superior to yours type of thing. Those guys are all about bigger and better, shinier more heavy duty bragging stuff. They pretty much dismiss small batch and extract brewers as not being "real brewers." The funny thing is in the same forum there's a tremendously expanding segment of small extract brewers AND a significant group of traditional 3 vessel system guys that are overhauling their system to make it simpler by going to BIAB. I think it's great that you can pick from so many levels to fit your preference, style, capacity, budget, whatever and still produce not only good beer but more importantly "your beer." Each batch you produce has your unique signature on it. That's what craftsmanship is all about, to me anyway.
  28. 6 points
    not only does mr beer make it easy... they are kind enough to provide us a support group. in my entire life i have NEVER stuck with anything for very long. i get bored. i get lazy. i walk away. ive never had any lasting hobby... or anything that gives me a modicum of pleasure.. until i discovered brewing.. and cheap wine making... and mead. where else can you experiment... get as complicated or simple as you want .. and drink your mistakes AND get buzzed while doing it? i just checked.. ive been brewing since 2012! time flies. i have never had a hobby this long.
  29. 6 points
    WOW... I cant believe I have been away for almost an entire year.... anyways.. I am finally getting to brew again. I am going to do the Octoberfest refill again (w/o booster) but this time I am using Safale US-05. I will continue to update this thread Hope everyone has been well this past year and had a good Thanksgiving!
  30. 6 points
    You have a great sense of timing, we just posted a new blog about that: https://www.mrbeer.com/blog/brew-beer-with-coffee/
  31. 6 points
    No, 11g in an LBK is not going to noticeably affect your beer. Yes, Mr. Beer supplies the proper amount of yeast for 2.13 gallons of beer. Yes, you can use an 11g packet of beer in an LBK. The answer isn't the amount of yeast, the answer is the amount of yeast cells. Unless you pull out a microscope and count yeast, you have no idea what number of cells are viable in the yeast you use. I suspect not one person on this forum does this. Most issues with yeast occur in a commercial brewery. Why? Because they have massive fermenters putting enormous weight (liquid wort) on top of a yeast cake, at the bottom of a tall fermenter that likely ends up in a cone. And most commercial breweries use yeast for multiple generations. If they are not careful, they can harvest weak cells that don't do well. With a Mr. Beer fermenter, there is a big surface with all the yeast spread out, and very little weight on it. That's why there's no issue. Here's one article on it - http://brulosophy.com/2016/11/07/yeast-pitch-rate-pt-5-underpitch-vs-overpitch-in-a-lager-exbeeriment-results/ There is a great book on yeast that is for those that are really, really, really into yeast (not me). Yeast: The Practical Guide to Beer Fermentation (Brewing Elements) by Chris White and Jamil Zainsheff Chris White owns White Labs, one of the main purveyors of liquid yeast. In fact, there is a whole series of books: Water: A Comprehensive Guide for Brewers (Brewing Elements) by John Palmer and Colin Kaminski Malt: A Practical Guide from Field to Brewhouse (Brewing Elements) by John Mallett For The Love of Hops: The Practical Guide to Aroma, Bitterness and the Culture of Hops (Brewing Elements) by Stan Hieronymus
  32. 6 points
    Mic Todd, So based on this skateboard analogy that you have spelled out it sounds as if it is a waste of time to give you any advice because you are just going to do what you want to anyway. I can respect that but I will also probably not be giving any advice to your questions since you are going to only listen to it if you think it is the right thing to do. Remember, those of us that help out a lot on this forum have made the mistakes, researched the hobby and or spent countless hours learning about the hobby from others. I have listened to hundreds of hours of podcasts and brewed nearly 100 batches of beer and mead. I have won many medals in beer competitions and am now also a BJCP beer judge. I don't brew Mr. Beer batches any longer, in fact I have converted to All Grain brewing. But I still take time on this forum to assist others who are just getting started in this hobby. I have seen countless post from users on this forum that have asked for advice and not taken it or have gone all mad scientist with their brewing. I have also seen many of them disappear from this forum. Maybe they just moved on or more likely they quit the hobby. So when @RickBeeror any of us who have been here for a period of time give advice that you may not like. Understand that we are trying to keep you form the members who have disappeared from the hobby. There is nothing personal in what some think are attacks. Dawg
  33. 5 points
    This is definitely true. My brewery only brews Belgian styles and we step mash every recipe, but 1 (our Belgian style IPA). Most recipes go through 2 rests, but our wit has 3 rests. Step mashing is also very beneficial when brewing single malt beers because it adds complexity and depth to the base grain you're using. Step mashing basically utilizes different enzymes to break down different starches into sugars. Single infusion mash beers are only utilizing 1 enzyme because the other enzymes were destroyed above certain temps. But by stepping your mash at different temps for different time periods, you are utilizing more types of enzymes, which also results in better mash efficiency and better attenuation in the end.
  34. 5 points
    Making this beer this weekend. Sub extract for 4lbs wheat and 4lbs pilsner. Also sub hallertau for liberty. The LHBS was out. Never used this yeast before, i have always used omegas hefe yeast in the past.
  35. 5 points
    I'm on the "if it ain't broke, don't fix it" band wagon. I've been doing the 3 weeks fermentation/4 week carbonation, 3 days cold crash. My beer has been turning out very good. I would be afraid to change my process now.
  36. 5 points
    The more craft beers I try the more I realize I usually prefer my homebrews.
  37. 5 points
    That might be me. I started out steeping four oz of carapils when brewing non partial mash recipes. I did this to help with head retention and body, and also because the addition of steeped/mashed grains seems to alleviate or even eliminate the dreaded "extract twang". Because of how it's malted, conventional wisdom is that there are no starches remaining in carapils that can be converted into fermentable sugars , so it doesn't add ABV. Kedogn and I were discussing this on here and he linked to an article that showed through experimentation that almost 20% of potential fermentable sugars can remain in carapils after malting. So I thought "Hey, that's potential ABV going to waste with every brew. SACRILEGE!" So I decided to start adding some 2-row along with the carapils. Two reasons for this: first, during mashing, the enzymes in the 2-row will convert some of the remaining starches in the carapils into sugars, and second, because 2-row is cheap so why not? 😁 Is it really making a big difference? Probably not. But if there are potential fermentables going to waste, I figure why not try and take advantage of them. So I now when I brew a beer that isn't a PM I mash four oz of carapils with two ounces of 2-row.
  38. 5 points
    This one's for you, @MiniYoda. I've never been to Kentucky but they tell me that this was a popular style back in the day. Hop times are 45, 15 and 5 minutes. This tasty all-grainer turned out great but I'll find out at Sunday's Lost Cabin Homebrew comp if it appealed to BJCP judges. Entered in the historical category, they will probably group it with other Amber/Common-type beers for judging. I'll follow up with a score then. 🍻 Dark Cream Ale (2-gallon, Mash-in-Sack) Rahr 6-row, 2.25 lb. Flaked corn, 1 lb. Briess Victory malt, 0.12 lb. Briess Crystal 60, 0.12 lb. Weyermann Carafa II (Special), 0.04 lb. Mt. Hood, 0.25 oz. Cluster, 0 25 oz. Mt. Hood, 0 25 oz. Safale K-97 German Ale yeast Step mash grains 20 min. @ 132 F followed by 40 min. @ 152 F, adjusting pH to 5.3 with lactic acid (if necessary). Mash out @ 168 F for 10 min. Sprinkle sparge grain bag with hot tap water. Begin 45 min. boil, hopping as indicated. Chill wort to < 70 F. Pitch K-97, areate, and ferment cool for 2 weeks. Cold crash is optional. OG 1.043 IBU 19 SRM 12-14 ABV 4.5 - 5%
  39. 5 points
    Where are you? At the Amundsen-Scott Research facility in Antartica?
  40. 5 points
    Tonight was the big night. Bottled my first attempt. Gonna be a long 4 weeks! Fingers and eyes crossed!
  41. 5 points
    Pipeline has begun! Irish Stout in bottles and Oktoberfest in the LBK. I used the booster this time just to see. It was kind of a pain stirring slowly to get it to dissolve so we'll see if it was worth it.
  42. 5 points
    Ankerdampf 2 gallon, all-grain (mash-in-sack) Weyermann Pilsner, 3.25 lb. Weyermann Vienna, 0.25 lb. Weyermann CaraMunich Type 2, 0.25 lb. Chateau Biscuit malt, 0.12 lb. Weyermann Carafa II, a smidgen German Northern Brewer, 9.4% AA, 0.33 oz ea. 45 min., 15 min., 3 min. Mangrove Jack's Californian Lager, M54 Prepare a balanced water profile using the Brewer's Friend online calculator. For my high residual alkalinity well water I diluted 1:1 with DI and then added calcium sulfate and sodium chloride. Mash @ 150 F for an hour, adjusting pH (if necessary) to 5.2 with a half tsp. lactic acid. Mash out @ 168 F for 10 min. Sprinkle-sparge with hot tap water. Begin 60 min. full volume boil. Add yeast nutrient with 10 min. left. Chill wort to <65 F. Transfer to LBK, make to volume, aerate, and pitch M54. Ferment @ cool ale temp., 63-64 F or so. OG 1.055 IBU 35 SRM 11
  43. 5 points
    At a temperature in the low 40s fermentation either stopped or never started to begin with. Warm up the keg to 62 to 66 degrees and let it ferment for at least 2 weeks, probably 3 weeks.
  44. 5 points
    This! My first time using a bottling wand was very frustrating...until I learned to insert it all the way, then just pull it out a little (Giggity). It worked like a charm after that. And welcome down the slippery slope.
  45. 5 points
    Hi @Big Sarge! My first brew salt additions were earlier this year with my English Bitter recipes as our water has no chloride or sulfate but has high alkalinity (308 mg/L!) That might work fine for HME batches and dark all-grain beers but there was no way that I was going to brew a respectable Bitter, Pale Ale or IPA without addressing my residual alkalinity issue. I would recommend poking around the Brewer's Friend website (or getting BeerSmith 3), obtain a water report, and read Palmer's chapter dealing with water chemistry. Once you know where your water is at you can pick a style-specific profile and make the necessary modifications to your water. Using the BF calculator, I was surprised how little calcium sulfate, calcium chloride and baking soda is added to deionized water to yield a more balanced profile for brewing a Pale Ale. Finally, I've just recently gotten more serious about 'dialing-in' recipes and improving my beers, but I'm still learning along with everyone else about this fascinating aspect of brewing!
  46. 5 points
  47. 5 points
    I tried my first bottle last night after chilling it for threes days. I know it was a few days early but I figured what the heck. I poured it into a glass slowly. There was no foam and I thought it was too early. I tasted it and it tasted pretty decent especially for a light beer. It had an amber color that looked similar to Sam Adams. It did seem carbonated perhaps a bit light on the carbonation so I will wait and try another bottle after I get back from my trip to the mountains. Overall I'm pretty pleased with my first batch.
  48. 5 points
    Two sides to every story (perhaps three or four). If someone likes a particular beer, so let it be. Brewing MB recipes may be a learning process in two ways. First, learning to brew. Secondly, a sophistication of the taste buds and learning to appreciate more flavorful styles of beer. RickBeer is correct, AB InBev may control much of the market, but hey I like some of those beers anyway. I've grown since my college days drinking Rolling Rock, but still drink a couple every now and then. BTW -just thought that I would add that I graduated college in 1979 - long before Rolling Rock was bought out.
  49. 5 points
    In case this is useful to anyone, https://vinepair.com/articles/flavors-aromas-craft-beer-hops-ipa/
  50. 5 points
    Here's what I'd do with it.
×
×
  • Create New...