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Davjohn

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About Davjohn

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    Brewmaster in Training
  1. NavyMarine1978 wrote: I have recently had a very poor experience with someone named Peter at Mr Brew. I had purchased a defective Mr Beer starter brew kit. The keg had a hole in the under belly of the keg seam. I had also purchased 3 new refill kits which I intended to brew until I encountered the defective keg. I attempted to call Mr Beer only to find that their 800 number does not work in Atlantic Canada. Since it was brew day and I had already waited two weeks, I was very annoyed by this point. Especially since I could not contact Mr Beer through their 800 customer service number. I found out later about the email which takes time for a response as well. I was upset, felt like I waited for nothing and was terribly let down by Mr Beer by this point. No keg to brew in and no customer service. I returned the starter kit to the store from which I purchased it from since a defective keg was useless ony to find that the store did not carry any more Mr Beer kits. I had purchased the kit for $34.50 taxes in. I ended up finding a local brewing company with people on site who brew, give advice and deliver exceptionally good customer service. I purchased a glass carboy (3 gal), air lock, complete recipe/ fresh ingredients for Irish Stout Draught (2 gal batch) with hops, yeast and grains, and instructions for $35.00. I since was contacted by someone named Peter from Mr Beer. I explained to him the problem which I encountered and what I had done and asked how Mr Beer was able to compensate me for my troubles and inconvenience. He responded with the statement that I had recieved my reimbursement from the store when I returned the defective kit and that Mr Beer was not willing to do anything for me. I asked had I given the kit as a gift to someone, the kit would not have been in my possesion either and he stated that honesty would come into play and that since I had told him that I had returned the kit to the store that Mr Beer owes me nothing. I asked about the inconvenience and trouble that I had been put through and he stated that the best thing he could do for me was 60% off a kit which would come to $60 with shipping. I responded with the fact that I had only paid $34.50 here in Nova Scotia and he said that was the best that Mr Beer could do. I was hoping for a keg to be sent to me by Mr Beer which was on discount for $10 which would allow me to brew the remaining 3 filler kits which I still have ($120 worth mailed to my door). I know that I have the option of brewing the other kits with the new equipment which I now have once the Irish Stout is done but, I want Mr Beer to compensate me for the inconvenience and trouble of waiting to brew and than not being able to based on their defective product. Mr Beer has lost a customer who wanted to continue buying form them until this incodent. They lost me over a $10 item and that they do not value me as a customer or that they have terrible customer service. You paid $34.50 for a Mr. Beer kit from a local store, not Mr Beer. Instead of going to the store, you contacted Mr. Beer. Since you bought it at a local store, Mr. Beer is not obligated to give you a replacement. If you wanted to get a replacement, you should have offered to send yours to Mr. Beer and they would have sent you a replacement. You pay shipping both ways. You finally did get the store to refund your cost, but you didn't get a replacement. Since you didn't get it from Mr. Beer in the first place, it is not unusual for the company to offer an upgraded purchase at a discount. In any case, 60% off is generous. This is a way to offer you compensation and at the same time, consideration. To summerize: 1. You bought a defective fermenter. 2. You got your refund. 3. You went to LHBS and got a replacement. 4. In 1, 2, & 3 you got everything you would get under normal situations. 5. You want compensation for what? Inconvenience and trouble? Pain and suffering? No one has the right to those considerations where there is no injury. Everyone feels injured when they can't get what they feel entitled to, but you're taking this out on the wrong person.
  2. pocketjr wrote: FrozenInTime wrote: Don't know if it's still usable or active, but here it is: http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?ie=UTF8&msa=0&msid=207317373496958825355.00049db24ba06045dfccf&ll=37. How do I add myself to this map? I added myself via the edit function, but I don't know if I did it right. === Apparently not. I just went back and checked. It's not there.
  3. FedoraDave wrote: I'd love to meet up with you guys, but it'll have to be a Saturday. Weeknights just don't work for me, and Friday night is Bowling League. Y'all are making me homesick. I was born in Waterbury, and raised in Prospect, about 3 miles from there.
  4. bpgreen wrote: mashani wrote: Davjohn wrote: Boe1971 wrote: What if you simply left the booster out of a Mr Beer batch and only used the HME? You should get something in the 1.5 or 2 % ABV right? Oddly enough, I asked that very question here quite a long time ago, but never got an answer. Yes one can of HME would be right around 2% if you filled to the 8.5 mark and I don't remember seeing the question the first time around. I'll agree that you'll get a beer that is about 2% or so, but it will also have less body and flavor. If you're okay with that, then a single can of HME will do the trick. The question that started this thread was really a two part question. One question was about making 3.2% beer and the other was about making .05% beer. Making 3.2% beer is easy. A standard refill is about 3.7% ABV. A deluxe or premium refill will be about 4% ABV. Since 3.2 beer uses ABW, if you make a 4% ABV beer, you've made a 3.2% ABW beer. If you're aiming for .05% ABV, you've got a pretty tough task. You can't naturally carbonate, because that can add nearly .5%. And even force carbonating, you'll need to get rid of nearly all the alcohol created during the brewing process. Even if you heat it, you're unlikely to get rid of enough alcohol to bring it down to .05%. .5% would probably be possible, though. Thanks, Y'all. This gives me the answers I need. This and the other answers within this thread. I think I mistyped when I asked about .05%. I meant .5%. I didn't know that the standard refills yielded only 4%. I knew it wasn't that strong, but I had always assumed a level better than 5%. Shows that I still have a lot to learn.
  5. Davjohn wrote: haerbob3 wrote: go to brew your own site they have info for low alcohol beers on session beers Brew your own site? Do you have a URL? Found it.
  6. Boe1971 wrote: What if you simply left the booster out of a Mr Beer batch and only used the HME? You should get something in the 1.5 or 2 % ABV right? Oddly enough, I asked that very question here quite a long time ago, but never got an answer.
  7. haerbob3 wrote: go to brew your own site they have info for low alcohol beers on session beers Brew your own site? Do you have a URL?
  8. sbehnke wrote: Davjohn wrote: Davjohn wrote: I just read an article on another site that talks about cutting the sugar in half, letting the full fermentation take place, then bottle as normal. It's supposed to result in less than 3% final ABV. I'd need to invest in a legitimate 5gal fermenter, though. My "5gal" fermenter overflows when full. It only makes 19 Liters instead of the standard 23. That doesn't sound like much, but it's a full gallon. It sounds like no only wasted beer but a horrific mess as well. Just the little wort I spilled on the top of my LBK has left it tremendously sticky. Yepper, you got that right. Fortunately, I caught it before it made a mess, and let 1 gallon flow into a sterile container. I had 4 gallons in the fermenter and one gallon in a container. I was able to catch it all. The container, however, couldn't be cleaned so I had to pitch it in the trash. I can get a fermenter online, but I choke on the $20 shipping. I don't know how I'm going to do it, so I'll stick with the LBKs for a while. If I do 5 gal I'll do 2 LBKs until I can find a suitable 6gal fermenter.
  9. Davjohn wrote: I saw a "Lawnmower Beer" item on a package. Sort of a beer to drink while doing yard work. It looked like it would be a lite beer that can be made with the LBK, but there were no instructions as to how to modify the normal procedure to get the desired result. It made me think: What would be the procedure to make low alcohol beer? Sometimes I really want a homebrew, but I don't want the alcohol. Is there a way to make 3.2% beer, .05% beer? Also, is there an alternative method to make beer with less sugar to result in a lower calorie beer. (Figured I'd ask while I'm here.) I just read an article on another site that talks about cutting the sugar in half, letting the full fermentation take place, then bottle as normal. It's supposed to result in less than 3% final ABV. I'd need to invest in a legitimate 5gal fermenter, though. My "5gal" fermenter overflows when full. It only makes 19 Liters instead of the standard 23. That doesn't sound like much, but it's a full gallon.
  10. I saw a "Lawnmower Beer" item on a package. Sort of a beer to drink while doing yard work. It looked like it would be a lite beer that can be made with the LBK, but there were no instructions as to how to modify the normal procedure to get the desired result. It made me think: What would be the procedure to make low alcohol beer? Sometimes I really want a homebrew, but I don't want the alcohol. Is there a way to make 3.2% beer, .05% beer? Also, is there an alternative method to make beer with less sugar to result in a lower calorie beer. (Figured I'd ask while I'm here.)
  11. Finally got the beer bottled. Took me all day. I think I'm running into all the "What Can Possibly Happen Next" in the same day. I told you about my fear of no fermentation because of the fermenter. OK, no prob there. Bottling day comes. I filled up the bottling bucket, add sanitizer and all the parts. Everything looks normal. Brought it out from the shower to the kitchen counter only to discover that right at that time it starts leaking. Panic to get the water out of the bucket and sanitize the bottles at the same time. Tighten the spigot, and it seems to fix the problem. Transfer the beer to the bottling bucket with fingers crossed, and it seems to work fine. Elevated the bucket, start bottling, and the bottling hose won't fit. It's about 1/64th of an inch too small for the slip fit into the spigot. Had to hold the hose in a towel at the spigot with one hand, the bottling wand with the other, and the bottling box with my knees. :ohmy: {Note to self: Grow third arm.} I have enough carbonation drops. I did the math, and it came out to 3 drops per liter. Hope that's right. (1 for 375 ml, 2 for 740, and 3 for 1,000). Bottled 23 liter bottles. :woohoo: I didn't lose as much as I feared. :whew: My kitchen and bathroom needed a good annual scrubbing, anyway. It's hard to manage all those bottles, buckets, and scrubbing from a rolling chair, but it works. Now to wait 7 days for the first tasting, and probably 14 days for the rest. In 19 days I'll order another kit. There's got to be a better way to do this, though. All-in-all it was an interesting afternoon. It reminds me of the guy who spends 5 hours griping about everything frustrating about his hobby. Someone asks "Why do you torture yourself with it?" "Because I enjoy it." Yeah, I know. Shut up, Dave.
  12. Thanks to all the brewers who post here. I apologize for all the rookie questions. I did a search, but didn't find the answer you pointed to, but on the up side, I got more information here. I'm brewing a Cooper's stout, and they sent me a kilo of dex/malt fermentable, which says is for "Pilsners, Draughts, and Lagers" and I was confused as to why. In my view, something more for a darker ale would be better, hence the question. Personally, I'm terrible at following recipes and written directions in general (for reasons not appropriate here), so I tend to ask a lot of questions, sometimes just to see the same thing said from different viewpoints. Because of the lack of space I have decided to stick to the Cooper's / Mr Beer / and possibly Munton's batches. I don't have room for a lot of ingredients, but I'm interested in the variations of the HME + LME vs. HME + Booster methods. While I'm here, what's the difference between a fermentable and an adjunct? Are adjuncts things like honey, fruit, etc. only to impart feel as opposed to "yeast chow"?
  13. If this is too far off topic, I apologize in advance. I did a search, and didn't find a better place to post this, and at least some of the questions are directly related. First, knowing that ABV is a measure of the result product, and influenced greatly by the fermentation variables, how do I know how much of what adjunct to put in to the fermenter in order to achieve the desired result of 1/3 alcohol by volume reserving 2/3 to the malt? My other question regarding the use of adjuncts are these. I've seen fermentables available in kits that are comprised of "99.5% Dextrose, dextrose and maltodextrin, dextrose, maltodextrin and Light Dry Malt, and lastly, light dry malt. Is Light Dry Malt the same as using LME? Is dextrose the same as Booster? Does the maltodextrin not ferment and really improve the body, mouthfeel and head retention? When using this sort of adjunct, why would the dextrose and maltodextrin mix be used with a stout when it would seem the LME or, at very least, a light dry malt would be the better choice? I have understood that if the sugars are used, the dextrose/maltodextrin is reserved for the lagers and light beers, not the dark ales like stout or porter.
  14. FedoraDave wrote: A lot of these arguments can be knocked down pretty easily. 1) Beer is a "cooked product." Okay, end of sermon. I'm gonna go have a beer (sadly, not one of my own, because my first batch is still carbing). Wow! I couldn't agree more. We have a LHBS here is NW Phoenix that has a sour attitude toward Mr Beer, Coopers, etc. He's lost customers (Primarily, Me.) because of it. Let's remember that all of these no boil systems have been cooked during the manufacture of the product, and that Mr Beer, et. al. are no less cooked products than the 5 gal from scratch recipes.
  15. Hello Kenny, I was glancing through the forum when I came across your post. There is a Beer Machine forum on Yahoo! Groups. The link is http://groups.yahoo.com/group/BeerMUG/. Most of the members there are Beer Machine and Mr Beer users. Join the fray and have a ball. - Dave
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