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Gymrat

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Everything posted by Gymrat

  1. 1/2 pound would be about right for a MrBeer size batch. I used a pound in a 5 gallon batch.
  2. I use lowes food grade buckets and lids with gaskets on them. Each one will hold 25 lbs.
  3. I use a one step soaked paper towel to sanitize the outside then I use it to siphon one step from one container to another to sanitize the inside of it.
  4. If you don't mind spending $20 or $30 beersmith kicks rump. There are a lot of free softwares that are good and will get you by. I used to be partial to brewmate. But beersmith has a lot of incredible features.
  5. Welcome to the forum. I love brewing but I am not crazy...and neither am I.
  6. "LorraineMontana" post=389077 said: "Gymrat" post=388965 said:I hope you left plenty of head space in that bucket. You better start rigging up a blow off tube. While the genders often differ on the representation of six inches, I maintain that my headspace allowance is in fact that amount. [attachment=14359]DSC_0053.jpg[/attachment] OK that was funny :chug: And that should be plenty of head space...so to speak.
  7. I hope you left plenty of head space in that bucket. You better start rigging up a blow off tube.
  8. I got it here http://www.midwestsupplies.com/stainless-steel-strainer-10-1-4-diameter.html
  9. Half an ounce of hops for 30 minutes and half for 5 minutes gave him 90 IBUs? What was the Alpha Acid percentage on those hops?
  10. "VTGroff" post=388651 said: "Gymrat" post=387779 said: "BlackDuck" post=387778 said:I've done the hopsack on the end of the tubing before with good success. I made sure that it was soaked with sanitizer first, then squeezed it to wring out as much of it as possible. I secured mine to the tube with a sanitized zip tie making sure the top of the bag was as close to the end of the tube as I could get it. This gave ample room for the bag to collect the floaties. I didn't use any weights to keep it down. I just made sure that I had plenty of tubing so it would reach all the way to the bottom of the bottling bucket (keg in your case). Make sure you completely sanitize the tubing also as it will be immersed in beer by the time you are finished. Too bad you can't cold crash first....I'm thinking that will help tremendously. When I get to my Pliny recipe, I plan on doing this procedure. This is exactly how I did it. Wait, so you guys put your sack on the output of the siphon? Hmmm....I might have to try that next time. I was putting it over the input of the siphon and thought it was introducing a lot of foam/oxygen into the process. Luckily I haven't had any oxidation issues with that batch. I'll definitely have to try putting the sack on the output tube next time when I rack my dry-hopped Belgian-Inspired IPA. Either way beats not filtering dry-hopped pellets. I did that for my IPA and clogged my keg output so bad it required major dis-assembly and re-assembly at least 5 times to clean out the dip tube/poppets/ The first time I tred it I put it on the input of the siphon and I got a lot of oxygen. The next time I put it on the output side and left plenty of slack on it and had no issues. I gave it a good long soak in one step first which not only sanitized but also minimized the amount of oxygen it introduced.
  11. If I am understanding you correctly, and you simply racked to a secondary, you won't see bubbles in the airlock, you won't see krauson, you won't see anything at all. That is the purpose of a secondary, to get the beer off the yeast while it is cleaning itself up. I can't imagine you seeing any activity at all unless you add more sugar and add more yeast.
  12. I had a lot of trouble with clogged bottling wands before I bought my strainer. I can absolutely tell the difference between using hop sacks and going commando. Commando really upped the hop flavor.
  13. If it hasn't conditioned out by now it most likely never will.
  14. I kinda wanted to brew today since it only got to around 90 degrees and I don't know when that will happen again. But I have about 50 gallons of beer cellared right now. I honestly don't know how I am going to get it all drank. I am afraid I am going to have to start pouring some out as it is nearly 2 years old. So I decided to take a brewing hiatus until the temps start dropping around September.
  15. With that big of early hop addition I dont know how it could not be bitter. That is why I decided not to brew it.
  16. I usually have 80 to 100lbs of grain on hand, as well as a few pounds of hops, and several packets of yeast. I pretty much brew whatever I am in the mood to brew at the time. Or sometimes I try a really good beer and go home and try to make something similar to it. I have gotten fairly good at cloning on taste alone.
  17. "Inkleg" post=387935 said:Roger, what does it say about the temperature when dry hopping? Thanks. There was no mention of temperature. So I would assume whatever you are fermenting at.
  18. "Beer-lord" post=387789 said: "Gymrat" post=387781 said: "Inkleg" post=387775 said:Going to be right there with you Paul. The Pliny gets dry hopped this weekend. I'm going to put the 3oz in the bottom of the secondary and rack the beer on top. The passage I read in For the Love of Hops said you get the best permeation by throwing the pellets on top of the beer and giving them time to sink on their own. This is interesting as I've seen it done both ways but some mentioned they float less if you add to the bottom first. But, I like the idea of sinking down and spreading out their goodness as they do so. Glad I posted this....thanks Roger! As for the hop bag, thanks Chris. I really wonder how much it will collect and if it will be worth it but I'd like to try anyway. When I did that I left a lot of spare bag to collect stuff.
  19. "Inkleg" post=387775 said:Going to be right there with you Paul. The Pliny gets dry hopped this weekend. I'm going to put the 3oz in the bottom of the secondary and rack the beer on top. The passage I read in For the Love of Hops said you get the best permeation by throwing the pellets on top of the beer and giving them time to sink on their own.
  20. "BlackDuck" post=387778 said:I've done the hopsack on the end of the tubing before with good success. I made sure that it was soaked with sanitizer first, then squeezed it to wring out as much of it as possible. I secured mine to the tube with a sanitized zip tie making sure the top of the bag was as close to the end of the tube as I could get it. This gave ample room for the bag to collect the floaties. I didn't use any weights to keep it down. I just made sure that I had plenty of tubing so it would reach all the way to the bottom of the bottling bucket (keg in your case). Make sure you completely sanitize the tubing also as it will be immersed in beer by the time you are finished. Too bad you can't cold crash first....I'm thinking that will help tremendously. When I get to my Pliny recipe, I plan on doing this procedure. This is exactly how I did it.
  21. I tried dry hopping commando on my last IPA. I had read in For the Love of Hops that they found it was the most effective way of dry hopping so I tried it. The difference was astounding. If you put a bag on your racking equipment, put it on the end in the bottling bucket or keg, and be sure to soak it down really good first to keep it from introducing oxygen into your beer. I learned this from much experimentation before I bought my strainer.
  22. "mtsoxfan" post=387736 said:BeerLabelMan... I think we mostly all can agree that if we had the same controls/equipment as the big boys our ales could be ready to drink in 3-4 as ours are ready now in close to that..... My question is geared more towards the more complex higher abv maltier brews and how they get them to be ready so soon. Same processes as the pale ale you described? RebelB/Gymrat from your replies it sounds like I may have been referencing somthing you wrote in the past. It sounds like you guys are able to drink your beers early, and I'd like to be there too. IMHO, all my heavy beers need extended conditioning times, and recently I brewed a cream ale that I felt should have been able to drink after 2 or so weeks conditioning due to the simplistic grain bill. After 2 weeks, tasted more like a fizzy club soda, 4 weeks much better, and 5 weeks drinkable/enjoyable. (Not too enjoyable, won't be brewing that again) So, in the name of becoming a better brewer, I'm trying to figure out what I can do differently to have my brews reach there potential earlier. As a side note, I purposely over pitched a washed and starter-ed us -05 in a brown ale that was damn good at 2 weeks and fantastic at 3. It has stayed there... not progressing after 3 weeks conditioning. I had crafted the recipe for it to have a bit more body so I anticipated an extended conditioning time, but wasn't needed. I don't know what I can tell you as far as what I might be doing differently. But I have had very few beers that weren't excellent brews after 2 weeks in the bottle. And those beers the problem was either the bittering hops were still too bitter, or the flavors hadn't quite melded together yet. Even my milk stout and my bourbon barrel porter were great after 2 weeks in the bottle. My bourbon barrel porter was so good after 1 week in the bottle that I ended up putting another bottle in the freezer to chill it so I could drink it after I finished my first one. Then I put 2 more in the fridge for the next day. I rarely ferment for more than 2 weeks. But I am extremely anal about getting lots of oxygen in my wort and my pitching temperature. I don't like to pitch over 68 degrees and much prefer pitching at 60 degrees. I generally have bubbles in my air lock in less than 24 hours in spite of never rehydrating my dry yeast. The only time I have used an adjunct since my Mr Beer days was when I used Lactose in my End of the World Milk Stout. I do all grain brews.
  23. Cold crashing before bottling is not necessary. I never have done it. And in MY opinion, the "my" is capitalized because I know many here disagree with me, neither is rehydrating your yeast. I don't think I have done that on more than half a dozen batches in my 3 and a half years of brewing. I think proper oxygenation and pitching temperatures are far more important.
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