Jump to content
Mr.Beer Community

craigger64

Community Members
  • Content Count

    275
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

0 Neutral

About craigger64

  • Rank
    Brewmaster in Training
  1. Wyeast Trappist High Gravity Yeast 3787 likes higher temps.
  2. Gymrat wrote: craigger64 wrote: I've NEVER had a problem keeping it lit on a windy day! In fact my last brew day was extremely windy, and it stayed lit the whole time! The wind may not put it out but does it take longer to get a boil when it is diffusing the flame? I have found I boil a lot faster in my garage for this reason. I've never noticed it taking longer to get to boiling when it's windy. I use a 15 gal kettle and usually start my boil for a 5 gal. batch at around 7.5 gal. It brings it to a boil pretty quickly. If I were near my notebook right now I could check my notes to tell you just how long, but believe me, it's quick.
  3. I've NEVER had a problem keeping it lit on a windy day! In fact my last brew day was extremely windy, and it stayed lit the whole time!
  4. I have the Bayou Classic SQ14 and I LOVE it! Bought it on Amazon. http://www.amazon.com/Bayou-Classic-SQ14-Single-Outdoor/dp/B0009JXYQ4/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1331985883&sr=8-1
  5. GOF wrote: Someplace back in this thread someone pointed out that the FG reading from a refractometer would need to be adjusted for the alcohol content. I got to thinking that it is more important that the reading is the same for a few days than it is to be accurate. What we really want to know is that it has reached its FG. What that FG is isn't nearly as important. That's a great point, GOF! In fact I just took an "FG" reading using my refractometer today for a Kolsch that I want to bottle this weekend. If the refractometer reads the same tomorrow, I will assume fermentation is finished. I don't plan on doing any of the conversions to find the FG.
  6. Brewish wrote: craigger64 wrote: You make an EXCELLENT point! We tend to get hung up on numbers. Efficiency, OG, FG, ABV etc. The bottom line is, if it tastes good we've succeeded. I like your attitude about "enjoyability" - this is a hobby, after all, and hobbies are supposed to be fun, right? @Craigger... your reply made me laugh. Some people seem so hung up on calculating and getting numbers right. I cant help but notice when I go to the microbrew store to collect free beer, most of the commercial bottles don't have any info about the beer other than the type. Very few have %ABV and even less have SRM and other details. So if the commercial beers that are in the business don't waste their time to put it on the label, how important is all that information in the whole scope of enjoying the beverage? You either like it, or you don't! Brew what you like, make mistakes, learn. Drink Beer! DONE! What a great hobby! I wish more people would realize this. But to each their own. IMHO. :gulp: First of all, sorry this reply comes late. I just saw your post this morning. True, most commercial beers don't put all that stuff on the labels, but some craft breweries have started putting IBU info on their labels and I've seen more and more list the ABV. The BIG commercial breweries (the big factory corn lagers for instance) don't put that info on their labels, cause let's face it, their consumers don't know what any of that stuff means, nor do they care. I check OG (and quite frankly don't even know why) and FG (twice, to determine whether or not fermentation has finished) and that's it. I brew all-grain, but have NEVER checked my efficiency, cause I make great beer without knowing that, and I don't have to account for every last bit of sugar. I brew what I like to drink, and if it tastes good I don't care if it's perfectly clear, or if it's the perfect clone (I don't brew clones - why brew something I can buy?) nor do I try to dial in IBU's or ABV. But like you said, "to each his own". I LOVE THIS HOBBY!!!!!!!!!
  7. Brewish wrote: craigger64 wrote: I love my refractometer! I use it to take readings throughout the entire brewing process. It automatically accounts for temperature, so there's no need to let a sample cool, and it only requires a drop of wort! I want to start experimenting with the various conversion charts for post-fermentation and compare my findings to actual hydrometer readings so that I can use my refractometer for post fermentation readings. I really don't like using a hydrometer. It requires too large a sample and I find it difficult to read. @Craigger so does this accurately give you a OG/FG? It gives an accurate OG. I have not yet learned how to do the conversion to use my refractometer for FG. For that I do still use my hydrometer. Im hesitant to do any of this because of the waste of volume and I don't care enough about %ABV of my batches to waste any. IMHO if it tastes like beer and I can drink a few and get a buzz, then I did well. If it tastes like amazing beer, I did better than well. If it tastes like the best beer I have ever had and others agree, Im going into business.... So I guess I go by the enjoyability to profitability ratio. You make an EXCELLENT point! We tend to get hung up on numbers. Efficiency, OG, FG, ABV etc. The bottom line is, if it tastes good we've succeeded. I like your attitude about "enjoyability" - this is a hobby, after all, and hobbies are supposed to be fun, right?
  8. I love my refractometer! I use it to take readings throughout the entire brewing process. It automatically accounts for temperature, so there's no need to let a sample cool, and it only requires a drop of wort! I want to start experimenting with the various conversion charts for post-fermentation and compare my findings to actual hydrometer readings so that I can use my refractometer for post fermentation readings. I really don't like using a hydrometer. It requires too large a sample and I find it difficult to read.
  9. you'll get more bitterness and flavor and less aroma, but i wouldn't worry that your beer is ruined - it'll be just fine!
  10. i stopped using hop sacks a long time ago. i even throw dry-hop additions into the fermenter "commando"
  11. Paid a visit to my LHBS. Picked up 9lbs of German Pilsner Malt, an oz. of Hallertau Hops, an oz. of Strisselspalt Hops, and liquid Kolsch yeast. Gonna brew up a simple Kolsch tomorrow (actually in about 9 hrs, cause it's already "tomorrow")
  12. My65bug wrote: Interesting. I was thinking about going with a refractometer actually. +1 I use a refractometer for checking gravity throughout the brew day process. Be sure to get one that compensates for temperature (ATC) so you don't have to cool your samples before checking them.
  13. Here is how I make a modified "Abbey Dubbel". The first time I brewed it I followed the recipe below. It was delicious! The second time, I used molasses in place of the brown sugar, and primed with buckwheat honey instead of sugar. The second batch is still conditioning, but the sample I tasted at bottling was very good. I let this beer condition a little longer than normal. I have found that the longer it's in the bottle the better it is. Actually, the Abbey Dubbel is the only Mr Beer recipe I still brew since moving on to all grain. 1 Can Octoberfest Vienna Lager HME 2 Cans Creamy Brown UME 1 Pouch Booster 1 Packet Saaz Pellet Hops 1 Packet Trappist High Gravity Liquid Ale Yeast YOU PR0VIDE: 1/4 Cup Brown Sugar 1/2 Teaspoon Crushed Coriander Seed
  14. I also use O2. MUCH shorter lag times than without the O2, and I also seem to have much more robust fermentations with O2. I also use it when making a starter.
×
×
  • Create New...