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slykryck

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About slykryck

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    Brewmaster in Training
  1. "Screwy Brewer" post=278199 said: Eventually you may want to mount the Co2 tank and gauges outside, it's way easier to adjust and takes up less space inside the refrigerator. I mounted my tap in the side instead of goiing through the door, I didn't want to deal with all the tubing ect. each time I had to get something, I'm not saying what you did isn't cool in fact I'm sure you're gonna love it. Screwy, I have considered eventually adding additional kegs/taps. If I built a shelf, I could easily get another 2 kegs in there. I would lose my bottle shelf, but with 4 kegs on tap, who needs bottled right? I've heard a lot about possibly hitting cooling lines when drilling thru the sides. Was that a concern for you? Is there a method to check for lines?
  2. "mnstarzz13" post=278091 said:Looks good! One thing i did and noticed you did too was put the faucet so high that if you opt for a taller tap handle, youll need to open the fridge to open the freezer. I figured thats not to big a deal. I might fix the two doors on my fridge together so if ya open one ya open the other I considered the height of the taps. I couldn't force myself to mount them any lower. Plus, I really do like the clean look of the simple black handles. That being said, the idea of fixing the doors together to allow larger handles sounds very intriguing. If you decide to do this, make sure to post pics.
  3. "bpgreen" post=278078 said:Looks good. In addition to the shelf for beer, you've got freezer space for ingredients. What size CO2 canister is that? 5lb tank. My understanding is that will get me thru 10-15 corny kegs. Already got a few bottles on the shelf and some hops and ice bottles in the freezer. Brewing my first 5 gal recipe on Monday, an all-grain amber ale. Also, question for those with kegerators. Beer lines are 3/16" and 6 feet long. CO2 lines are 5/16" and 3 feet long. None of that should be a problem will it?
  4. Finished my kegerator today. Converted a refrigerator to hold to 5 gallon corneys. Thanks to a lucky craiglist score, I less than $250 in the setup (excluding the cost of the kegs). :banana: Now I just have to brew some beer to fill it. [img size=400]https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-FDNy-FDkBHA/UByPkm0yQ5I/AAAAAAAAAMs/eIwmad0K4wc/s400/898110246.JPG [img size=400]https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-9EMzi-i7D8M/UByPnMPmtWI/AAAAAAAAAMw/rDmqKKYSGxI/s400/634255060.JPG [img size=400]https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-0qJIwPF263I/UByRvPuZ_5I/AAAAAAAAAM8/o7WZUnNgwRI/s400/911267118.JPG
  5. "Inkleg" post=275414 said:You may want to hold on to those couplers. If you still buy beer like I do it's really nice to get it in a keg if you have to room. I have a torpedo of Terripan Hopsecutioner in my keezer along with my kegs. It sure is nice to pour only a few ounces if I don't want a full 12. That's a good call. I haven't quite decided yet what I'm going to do. All still a work in progress. Maybe I'll invest in one of the quick disconnect systems that allow you to easily switch from a ball/pin lock keg to sanke. Be nice to have that option isfahan I wanted.
  6. "pointzro60" post=275394 said: "slykryck" post=275318 said:Scored pretty big on Craigslist. Guy had a fridge converted into a kegerator. Wanted $75 for the whole setup. After arranging for a time I could go buy it, he discovered it wasn't cooling. Said I could have it all for free. I gave him $10 anyway and still feel like I got over. Getting the fridge hauled off and I'm left with faucet and shank, domestic and import sankeys, regulator and 5lb C02 tank. I'm pretty stoked. Now just need to find a working fridge on craigslist. [img size=288]https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-gYByfr2vSvE/UAdohY73BJI/AAAAAAAAAMM/B-tEjD81E9M/s288/1582505963.JPG nice score but your going to need kegs and in and out disconnects for those kegs as well if your going to use it for home brew. I do plan to use it for homebrew and realize I need kegs and ball or pin lock disconnects. I have no plans to use the use 2 couplers. Heck, the may go on Craigslist so I can make my $10 plus some back. Those things retail $30-40 a piece. Entire setup above would retail at about $200. The plan is to have a 3-tap kegerator converted from a fridge. With another Craigslist fridge, I can complete that setup for not much more than the entire setup above would have cost.
  7. Scored pretty big on Craigslist. Guy had a fridge converted into a kegerator. Wanted $75 for the hole setup. After arranging for a time I could go buy it, he discovered it wasn't cooling. Said I could have it all for free. I gave him $10 anyway and still feel like I got over. Getting the fridge hauled off and I'm left with faucet and shank, domestic and import sankeys, regulator and 5lb C02 tank. I'm pretty stoked. Now just need to find a working fridge on craigslist. [img size=288]https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-gYByfr2vSvE/UAdohY73BJI/AAAAAAAAAMM/B-tEjD81E9M/s288/1582505963.JPG
  8. It been a while since I brewed this, but if I remember correctly, it comes with 1 HME and 1 UME so there is only one pack of yeast. If that is the case, more yeast will definitely help. Also, be careful of malt/adjunt ratios if you are planning to add more honey. Between the fruit and the honey in the standard recipe, it may be approaching recommended limits already.
  9. If i'm understanding you correctly, you would only have it in the LBK for a short time (1-2 days for cold crashing). Kinda of seems like more trouble than it's worth if it's only for the sake of cold crashing. You won't get the benefits of a secondary in the amount of time and you add the risk of infection/aeration as jaydubwill said.
  10. "mashani" post=254685 said:Traditional black and tans are *real* guiness - which is not Extra Stout, it's the light bodied low alcahol pub draft kind. It's much lighter in body then bass pale ale. It's just barely over 4% ABV or so, and it starts off at only around 1.04 OG. Really. It's very quaffable, it's not a thick/chewy heavy bodied beer. People have a mistaken belief that the nitrogen is what lightens pub guiness - and it does affect how it feels in your mouth by giving it tiny bubbles - but the fact is that it's basically a dark flavorful lawnmower beer in the first place. Bass Pale ale, it's traditional counterpart is 5% ABV. If you try to pour a black and tan using Guiness Extra Stout (which is a *totally different beer* then draft Guiness) on top it doesn't work. Extra stout will sink. Ah, I didn't realize which Guiness you used mattered (honestly, I didn't realize that Guiness Draught was only 4ish ABV). That makes a ton of sense. Thanks mashani!
  11. "mashani" post=254630 said: "JonEleven" post=254603 said:In order to keep them separated I've heard you would have to use nitrogen carbonation as is normally used in the stout Nah... nitrogen isn't necessary. It might help, but it's not necessary. But the beer at the bottom has to have finished with a higher FG then the beer that you want to stay on top. IE you can make a reverse black and tan if you mix Guiness extra with bodingtons instead of say pub draft with bass. IE guiness extra = tan top, black bottom... where pub draft = tan bottom, black top. You want to pour the heavy beer first, and then the lighter bodied beer on top, using a spoon or some other device to help distribute the pour more evenly across the surface instead of as a stream directly into the beer. So the pale ale has a higher FG than Guiness? I thought stouts usually have a higher FG, resulting in more body.
  12. "JonEleven" post=254603 said:In order to keep them separated I've heard you would have to use nitrogen carbonation as is normally used in the stout This was the same thought I had, unless someone knows otherwise. I think it is because the nitrogen is less dense than CO2 allowing the Guiness to float atop the pale ale.
  13. "Ossian666" post=254076 said:And I have a quick question about using the harvested yeast. Screwy Brewer says to make a starter with some DME and let is start to build 24 hours before you go to use yeast. The term flask is used...the mason jars all contain yeast, but are you literally just taking like 3 ounces out of a jar? Or do you use the whole mason jar? I guess my confusion comes not with the harvesting, but the amount of the jar used when you go to make a starter. A day or two before brewing, I take one mason jar of yeast out of the fridge. I decant most of the liquid, leaving enough to swirl the yeast. I allow it to warm up to room temp while making my starter. Once starter is prepared, I swirl the mason jar to capture all the yeast, dump it into the flask and place on the stir plate. Once starter is done, I like like to chill the starter and decant most of the "starter beer" as well before pitching. My yeast washing/harvesting process does differ a little from those above. I sanitize all my equipment with starsan. It's easier than handling boiling hot glass jars. I actually used a video tutorial from billybrew.com.
  14. I'm not familiar with this recipe, but the reason for the pale extract is because you'll get your color from the other dark malts (chocolate, brown malt, caramel 120, and roasted barley). Plus, It will get darker from boiling. If you used a dark extract, it would come out even darker. The other thing with dark extracts is that there are other malts mixed in. Light/pale extracts are going to impart the least amount of "other" flavors. Think of it this way: if it were an all grain recipe, all that pale extract would be replaced with a 2-row.
  15. Brew club orders do not reserve the items in your order. So, if you want to get a limited release, such as a seasonal, you have to change the date of your brew club orders. This allows you to still take advantage of the shipping promotions being offered. If you put a seasonal on your order that won't ship for a couple of months, you risk it selling out prior to your order.
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