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BIG TEX

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About BIG TEX

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  1. Rayyankee wrote: I have made raspberry beers twice now for SWMBO and they turnoed out great without as much work as you are talking about. I used 2 cans Wittymonk Witbeer HMEs and 1 can Golden wheat UME 1 can oregon Raspberry.1oz. hallertau hops dry hopped.sanitized the blender and pureed the heck out of the raspberries. i used 2 packets of fromunda yeast.I put the berries in for primary and still got enough of the raspberry flavor and aroma without it over powering.Fermented 3 weeks condition 6weeks my wife and others that enjoy fruit beers loved this and said it was better then many other fruit beers they had. If using the fromunda yeast, I'm assuming it's two packets because it's one yeast packet for each can of HME. If using a liquid yeast, would I need to add two packages, or would pitching only one do the job?
  2. Rayyankee wrote: ... I used 2 cans Wittymonk Witbeer HMEs and 1 can Golden wheat UME 1 can oregon Raspberry.1oz. hallertau hops dry hopped. ... How did the orange and corriander flavors blend with the raspberries? Did the dry hop more or less balance those flavors out?
  3. I had posted this in a different thread, but was advised to start a new thread to get a better response. My wife is looking for a good raspberry beer for me to make when I get back to the States in a few months. I've been doing some research and came up with some ideas that some of you experienced brewers can ponder and let me know if I'm on the right track or way off in left field somewhere. First, I have not brewed with fruits before, so this is new territory for me and I hear fruits can be volatile and tend to blow up from time to time. Second, I'm still what many will consider a cherry in the brewing game. But the good thing about deployments is that there is a lot of time to read, and study, and think about making beer. Back to the important stuff. Here's what I have in mind, which is where I might need a little course correction. I want to make this brew with the Whispering Wheat HME, the Golden Wheat UME, and raspberries (of course). I was reading that some people have made good raspberry beers with 2 cans of the HME and 2 cans of raspberries (one being added after primary fermentation). I was leaning towards that route and go with the 2 cans of HME and I think I will want to add 1 can of the UME for a little malt balance. I was also looking at adding a packet of Hallertau hops to the boil to balance against the sweetness of all that malt in the wort. To get what I need out of the hops, I'm thinking maybe a 20-30 minute boil, ~1.25 gal, together with UME then cut the heat off. I'm not going to lie and say that adding 8oz of honey 3-5 minutes before flameout didn't cross my mind here, because it did (but still not sure if this is the best point). Once the heat's off, add the HME, give it a good mixing, then cool the wort. Once the wort's cooled to pitching temperature, add it to the brew keg, add water to bring it up to the 8.5qt mark, then take a original gravity reading. Then I would add one can of the pureed raspberries and a packet of Weihenstephan Weizen Liquid Yeast, and give it a nice, vigorous stirring. Once it's had enough time to set for primary fermentation, say 10-14 days, I would give it another gravity reading to see if primary fermentation is over. If that's good to go, I would rack it to a secondary fermenter and SLOWLY add the second can of pureed raspberries (and maybe that honey if I didn't add it after the boil) for some extra character and complexity. I'm thinking about a week in the secondary, cold crash, then rack to the bottling bucket and batch prime with honey. Once bottled, let it carbonate and condition for 2-3 weeks, then toss in the fridge for a few more weeks before cracking open and sucking one down. It's a lot of work and I'm thinking all that mess will get me somewhere between 6-7%. Maybe all that noise makes sense and maybe I'm taking too big a bite, so here's what I am looking for in a finished prouct. 1) Drinkability. It has to smell good, taste good, and go down smooth (duh). 2) Complexity. The desired effect is an aromatically pleasing beer with an initial raspberry bite on top of a clean and balanced wheaty beer with a sweet honey-wheat finish without a harsh and bitter aftertaste. And of course, these flavors must blend together seamlessly. 3) Me and the one who asked me to make this beer (the Queen) should want to take another sip. Though this particular setup may yield a higher ABV, I don't want to get kicked in the face by it (not by this particular beer anyway). Any help and advice you can throw this way would be greatly appreciated. I still have a few months before I get back to the States, so I'm not going to get in a big damn hurry to make this thing. I want to get all the advice I can from the more seasoned folks before I start making it so my first brew back home is a hit. Please let me know how I can make this brew better. Thanks! Cheers! :chug:
  4. I had posted this in a different thread, but was advised to start a new thread to get a better response. My wife is looking for a good raspberry beer for me to make when I get back to the States in a few months. I've been doing some research and came up with some ideas that some of you experienced brewers can ponder and let me know if I'm on the right track or way off in left field somewhere. First, I have not brewed with fruits before, so this is new territory for me and I hear fruits can be volatile and tend to blow up from time to time. Second, I'm still what many will consider a cherry in the brewing game. But the good thing about deployments is that there is a lot of time to read, and study, and think about making beer. Back to the important stuff. Here's what I have in mind, which is where I might need a little course correction. I want to make this brew with the Whispering Wheat HME, the Golden Wheat UME, and raspberries (of course). I was reading that some people have made good raspberry beers with 2 cans of the HME and 2 cans of raspberries (one being added after primary fermentation). I was leaning towards that route and go with the 2 cans of HME and I think I will want to add 1 can of the UME for a little malt balance. I was also looking at adding a packet of Hallertau hops to the boil to balance against the sweetness of all that malt in the wort. To get what I need out of the hops, I'm thinking maybe a 20-30 minute boil, ~1.25 gal, together with UME then cut the heat off. I'm not going to lie and say that adding 8oz of honey 3-5 minutes before flameout didn't cross my mind here, because it did (but still not sure if this is the best point). Once the heat's off, add the HME, give it a good mixing, then cool the wort. Once the wort's cooled to pitching temperature, add it to the brew keg, add water to bring it up to the 8.5qt mark, then take a original gravity reading. Then I would add one can of the pureed raspberries and a packet of Weihenstephan Weizen Liquid Yeast, and give it a nice, vigorous stirring. Once it's had enough time to set for primary fermentation, say 10-14 days, I would give it another gravity reading to see if primary fermentation is over. If that's good to go, I would rack it to a secondary fermenter and SLOWLY add the second can of pureed raspberries (and maybe that honey if I didn't add it after the boil) for some extra character and complexity. I'm thinking about a week in the secondary, cold crash, then rack to the bottling bucket and batch prime with honey. Once bottled, let it carbonate and condition for 2-3 weeks, then toss in the fridge for a few more weeks before cracking open and sucking one down. It's a lot of work and I'm thinking all that mess will get me somewhere between 6-7%. Maybe all that noise makes sense and maybe I'm taking too big a bite, so here's what I am looking for in a finished prouct. 1) Drinkability. It has to smell good, taste good, and go down smooth (duh). 2) Complexity. The desired effect is an aromatically pleasing beer with an initial raspberry bite on top of a clean and balanced wheaty beer with a sweet honey-wheat finish without a harsh and bitter aftertaste. And of course, these flavors must blend together seamlessly. 3) Me and the one who asked me to make this beer (the Queen) should want to take another sip. Though this particular setup may yield a higher ABV, I don't want to get kicked in the face by it (not by this particular beer anyway). Any help and advice you can throw this way would be greatly appreciated. I still have a few months before I get back to the States, so I'm not going to get in a big damn hurry to make this thing. I want to get all the advice I can from the more seasoned folks before I start making it so my first brew back home is a hit. Please let me know how I can make this brew better. Thanks! Cheers! :chug:
  5. texasbrewer0069 wrote: BIG TEX your may want to start a new thread to get better response to your particular questions ... a brew as strong as your wanting to make needs 6-8 weeks conditioning time ... You seem to have the basic idea down... I have done one fruit brew and o added the fruit after primary fermentation ... could barely taste cherry flavor ... Anyway your on the right track ... yankeedag wrote: simplified: do your wheat beer, add an ounce and a half of the raspberry flavoring prior to bottling, and call it good. Take notes, and adjust to taste from that point. Thanks for the input, gentlemen. This thread also helped me answer a lot of my questions, too. I need to start coming back to this forum more often, even if I'm not brewing right now. Cheers! :chug:
  6. My wife is looking for a good raspberry beer for me to make when I get back to the States in a few months. I've been doing some research and came up with some ideas that some of you experienced raspberry beer brewers can ponder and let me know if I'm on the right track or way off in left field somewhere. First, I have not brewed with fruits before, so this is new territory for me and I hear fruits can be volatile and tend to blow up from time to time. Second, I'm still what many will consider a cherry in the brewing game. But the good thing about deployments is that there is a lot of time to read, and study, and think about making beer. Back to the important stuff. Here's what I have in mind, which is where I might need a little course correction. I want to make this brew with the Whispering Wheat HME, the Golden Wheat UME, and raspberries (of course). I was reading that some people have made good raspberry beers with 2 cans of the HME and 2 cans of raspberries (one being added after primary fermentation). I was leaning towards that route and go with the 2 cans of HME and I think I will want to add 1 can of the UME for a little malt balance. I was also looking at adding a packet of Hallertau hops to the boil to balance against the sweetness of all that malt in the wort. To get what I need out of the hops, I'm thinking maybe a 20-30 minute boil, ~1.25 gal, together with UME then cut the heat off. I'm not going to lie and say that adding 8oz of honey 3-5 minutes before flameout didn't cross my mind here, because it did (but still not sure if this is the best point). Once the heat's off, add the HME, give it a good mixing, then cool the wort. Once the wort's cooled to pitching temperature, add it to the brew keg, add water to bring it up to the 8.5qt mark, then take a original gravity reading. Then I would add one can of the pureed raspberries and a packet of Weihenstephan Weizen Liquid Yeast, and give it a nice, vigorous stirring. Once it's had enough time to set for primary fermentation, say 10-14 days, I would give it another gravity reading to see if primary fermentation is over. If that's good to go, I would rack it to a secondary fermenter and SLOWLY add the second can of pureed raspberries (and maybe that honey if I didn't add it after the boil) for some extra character and complexity. I'm thinking about a week in the secondary, cold crash, then rack to the bottling bucket and batch prime with honey. Once bottled, let it carbonate and condition for 2-3 weeks, then toss in the fridge for a few more weeks before cracking open and sucking one down. It's a lot of work and I'm thinking all that mess will get me somewhere between 6-7%. Maybe all that noise makes sense and maybe I'm taking too big a bite, so here's what I am looking for in a finished prouct. 1) Drinkability. It has to smell good, taste good, and go down smooth (duh). 2) Complexity. The desired effect is an aromatically pleasing beer with an initial raspberry bite on top of a clean and balanced wheaty beer with a sweet honey-wheat finish without a harsh and bitter aftertaste. And of course, these flavors must blend together seamlessly. 3) Me and the one who asked me to make this beer (the Queen) should want to take another sip. Though this particular setup may yield a higher ABV, I don't want to get kicked in the face by it (not by this particular beer anyway). Any help and advice you can throw this way would be greatly appreciated. I still have a few months before I get back to the States, so I'm not going to get in a big damn hurry to make this thing. I want to get all the advice I can from the more seasoned folks before I start making it so my first brew back home is a hit. Please let me know how I can make this brew better. Thanks and happy brewing!
  7. I had a friend suggest using a little molasses ... How would that fare? Would that make it too dark or be too much and possibly compromise the taste?
  8. Tinybuffalo wrote: I made the Cowboy Golden Lager/Creamy Brown UME... It was delicious!! I also added Honey and Brown Sugar, don't remimber the ammounts off hand. Brown Sugar does sound like it would be tasty! Did you use that as the priming sugar when you bottled or did you add it into the wort?
  9. Twiz wrote: Booster? Sounds smooth. Im new to this myself. Just thinking up ideas is half the fun. No, no booster. Deluxe Refill kit.
  10. What do you think? I am thinking of doing a Golden Cowboy HME w/ Creamy Brown UME for my next batch - Pretty much out of curiosity, since I am still new at this. How about a little bit of honey? Think it might be worth trying? Thoughts are welcome. Thanks!
  11. Oosse, I also bottled my first batch today. Tasted the beer before I bottled, and sure enough, tasted like flat beer. Noticed that before I tasted what little sample I had taken that it was cloudy. So, just out of curiosity, I took another small sample and the color was clearer. So it sounds like we're both doing something right! I had planned to let the bottles sit for about 2 weeks before tossing them in the fridge for another 2 weeks or so. This is my first batch ... And I will have invested 6 weeks into it when it's all said and done. But from what I am learning from this forum, it will be well worth it! Good luck with your brewing!
  12. Dag, I am fairly new at this home brew thing and I have a noob question for you. I understand the concept and purpose of cold crashing (to get the sediment to settle to the bottom and to suspend activity of the yeast), but I'm afraid I don't know the exact method. By the name, I am assuming it's as simple as sticking the fermenter in the fridge for a few days to clear up the brew. Then, I take it out, let it warm up, and begin my bottling. Am I right in my assumptions? I am on my first batch and it's a little cloudy and I want to make sure I have the right ideas before I go and mess it up. Thanks!
  13. I am on my first batch of home brew. I have the Golden Cowboy working right now. It's been in the fermenter for 5 days now and one of the problems I had in the first couple days of fermenting is the temperature where I keep the fermenter. I have had to move it several times now - First it was at 74-75 degrees, which is way too high. Moved it to another room where the temperature dropped between 65-67 degrees. I finally moved it into another closet where I can keep the temperature right around 69-70 degrees. I've been trying to follow the directions on this one and keep it between 68-76 degrees, but closer to 70 as recommended. Looking for some advice/answers on this one ... Does moving the fermenter and possibly disturbing the liquid inside affect the yeast or the fermentation at all? I have this feeling that with all the moving and as careful as I was trying to be that I might have affected the process and might have ruined this batch. And, if it is still good, what, based on experience amongst you seasoned brewers, is a good ideal temperature to ferment at? Any tricks to reduce temperature around the fermenter? (I read about the wet t-shirt trick and I may have to try that for next time.) Right now, I am using the basic noob recipe - HME, Booster, and dry yeast. Thanks for reading and hope to be enjoying some homemade beer soon!
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