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SmokingTony

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Everything posted by SmokingTony

  1. Jester wrote: new brewer from south texas Hey man, I see you are from Rio Grande City. I live in Edinburg by UTPA. Been brewing for almost a year now and I would love to start a valley homebrew club.
  2. Are you properly aerating your wort with a whisk?
  3. bpgreen wrote: SmokingTony wrote: I am a fairly new brewer, and I have only used cane sugar to prime, but my thinking is that most brewer's wouldn't add corn sugar to their fermenter during primary fermentation, so why would you want to add it during the bottling process. FedoraDave, you said it was minimal in that it doesn't affect the flavor of the beer, but if you add up all the teaspoons it takes to prime a LBK batch, I imagine it would amount to about 1/3-1/2 a cup. Would you add that amount of cane sugar to any batch during primary fermentation? Just my two cents. Although I am a new brewer, I am a purist when it comes to foods and such, so I think it would be more appropriate to prime with DME, and I hope to switch over to doing so once I have a more stable and consistent brewing process. I think your math is off. If we add 1/4 tsp per 12 ounce bottle and get 24 bottles for a 2.4 gallon batch, that's 6 tsp or 2 tbsp, which is 1/8 cup. Definitely less than I thought. I guess I still wouldn't be able to tell any difference until I split a batch between priming methods
  4. I am a fairly new brewer, and I have only used cane sugar to prime, but my thinking is that most brewer's wouldn't add corn sugar to their fermenter during primary fermentation, so why would you want to add it during the bottling process. FedoraDave, you said it was minimal in that it doesn't affect the flavor of the beer, but if you add up all the teaspoons it takes to prime a LBK batch, I imagine it would amount to about 1/3-1/2 a cup. Would you add that amount of cane sugar to any batch during primary fermentation? Just my two cents. Although I am a new brewer, I am a purist when it comes to foods and such, so I think it would be more appropriate to prime with DME, and I hope to switch over to doing so once I have a more stable and consistent brewing process.
  5. bpgreen wrote: SmokingTony wrote: Does the trub at the bottom of the LBK contain hops as well as yeast? I don't want to bother too much with these mixes so I think I will try dumping them over the trub of my current batches after I bottle. I'm willing to accept that these beers wont be great, but they will be beer. Whether the trub contains hops depends largely on how the beer was brewed. If you used HMEs or if you added hops without a hop sack, the trub definitely has hops. Even if you used a hop sack, some hops may have seeped out, and they'd settle out in the trub. The general rule of thumb when pitching on the existing yeast is to go from less to more--lighter in color to darker, lower in ABV to higher, less hoppy to more hoppy. Well I used HMEs for the current batches, so there are definitely some hops in that trub. Unfortunately, these 'expired' beer mixes are not too dark, heavy or hoppy, but I don't want to invest any extra material into them, so I will just pour them over the trub, see how they come out, and chalk it up as a learning experience.
  6. Does the trub at the bottom of the LBK contain hops as well as yeast? I don't want to bother too much with these mixes so I think I will try dumping them over the trub of my current batches after I bottle. I'm willing to accept that these beers wont be great, but they will be beer.
  7. I'm going to try splitting 3 cans of the OVL and 2 pouchs of booster between 2 LBKS.
  8. Cooper's big cans of 3.75 hopped LME are meant to be combined with an additional 3 pounds of unhopped LME for a 5 gallon batch. You can split both cans between 2 LBKs and you should be fine. I am going to do this.
  9. booster will not add flavor, only alcohol content. the more booster, the stronger and uglier your beer will be. if you love quality beer, then you need to add an extra can of UME or HME in place of your booster, or you can add the UME/HME AND 1/2 a pouch of booster, or a 1/3 or whatever. booster has its place, just don't try and make it the star. also, booster leads to an extended conditioning time (time in the bottle before the beer tastes good enough to drink). you should leave your beer in the fermenter for 2-3 weeks then in the bottle at room temperature for 3-4 weeks before sticking them in the fridge for at least a few days. good beer takes time. also, a good amount of yeast is very important. one pack of Mr. Beer yeast is barely enough to get the job done. if you use 2 or 3 packs, you will be able to tell the difference. bottom line, if you are a serious beer connoisseur, use two cans of HME, 2-3 packs of yeast, no booster, and you should be pretty happy with the results. also remember to properly sanitize and aerate your wort, extremely important steps.
  10. I have 3 large packs of hopped DME that say "best by May 2010". They are mix packs for "the beer machine" and include yeast packs. They are unopened, so I can't see if there is anything wrong with them but I imagine the yeast is expired. Does old hopped DME taste bad? I figured I could just pitch some new yeast, but I don't want to waste any time on some beer that is going to taste like crap FWIW, they are a pilsner golden lager and american lager
  11. This step is definitely not emphasized enough in the MB instructions. I believe it just says to "stir" the wort. After the first batch that I properly aerated, I totally understood it's importance.
  12. I was in denial about this until two days ago. I have been brewing with MB for over 6 months and I have done about 10 batches. Two days ago I tried my most recently bottled batch and it was my best yet, and quite frankly, one of the best beers I've ever had. The sad part is that it was such a simple recipe. I split 3 cans of MB Golden Lager between two kegs and added a pouch of booster to each keg. I also split the 3 packs of MB yeast between the two batches, so each batch contained 1.5 cans of MB Golden Lager, 1 pouch of Booster, and 3 grams of Fromunda yeast. What else did I do differently? I kept the temperatures low for 3 weeks in the fermenters, I cold crashed for 3-4 days in the fridge before bottling, and what I think is the two most important things....I let the wort cool down in the fermenters for 2 days tucked in an ice chest with ice packs before pitching the yeast, and I aerated the wort like crazy before pitching the yeast.
  13. I am going to do this, but I read something along the lines that the "follow-up" beer that you pour over the trub should be a certain style in regards to higher ABV or higher IBU. Can anyone clarify this and maybe offer some explanation?
  14. k9dude wrote: I made a batch on Nong pumpkin spice cider and went by the nong's suggested 3/4 tablespoon per 12 oz bottle. My first cider so I did a batch with half carbed and half uncarbed. EDIT: BTW welcome to the BORG!! There are many helpful and kind people here. Hope you enjoy!! :chug: That sounds like a lot of priming sugar for a 12 oz bottle
  15. NewMBbrewer wrote: how long can you keep a can once it is open? I only split a can between two batches when I am doing them right after one another, so its only exposed for about 10 minutes. I think I've heard of people storing LME in the fridge, so you might be able to store MB extracts by pouring them into sanitized containers with lids.
  16. The reason it was only half a can was that I used the other half right before with a full can of blonde. I was going to do two of the same batches of 1 can blonde and 1/2 can red, but during the second batch I realized I had an extra can of HCCD that I didn't know what to do with. I haven't pitched the yeast yet since I have the kegs in the cooler with ice packs to bring the temps down. I will be splitting a pack of 11.5 g Safale US-05 between the two batches. I will probably add about 2/3 of the yeast to this high ABV recipe in discussion.
  17. I was brewing and went a little mad scientist. 1 can HCCD 1 can Blonde 1/2 can Bewitched Red 1 pouch of Booster about 6 grams of Safale US-05 Can anyone tell me the kind of style and ABV I should expect out of this? I imagine it will also benefit from substantial conditioning time.
  18. d3EP wrote: SmokingTony wrote: Well I just feel that splitting 11.5 between two batches is kind of wasting some since MB gives you 2 grams of a lower quality yeast for each batch. I think splitting it between 3 batches would be OK though, so if I wanted to save about 3-4 grams for a 3rd batch at a later time, what would be the best way to store it? Refrigerator, possibly in a small sanitized jar with some clean water or wort Hmmm. So you suggest I hydrate it before storing it? Interesting. Thank you very much for the feedback.
  19. Well I just feel that splitting 11.5 between two batches is kind of wasting some since MB gives you 2 grams of a lower quality yeast for each batch. I think splitting it between 3 batches would be OK though, so if I wanted to save about 3-4 grams for a 3rd batch at a later time, what would be the best way to store it?
  20. Can an 11.5 gram pack of Safale US-05 be divided into 4 MB size batches? If so, and I make 2 batches tonight, what is the best way to store the rest of the yeast for 3 weeks until I do the other 2 batches?
  21. mashani wrote: SmokingTony wrote: thanks for all the info guys. my next brews will be a golden lager, american lager, and a pilsner, so US-05 it is. I'm assuming you are using an ale yeast in lagers because you can't keep fermentation temps low enough to actually use a lager yeast? If so, another really good choice is Danstar Nottingham - if you can keep your fermenation temps in the lower 60s you will make very clean beer with it like S-05, but it does fine down to 57 degrees... if you can keep them 57-59 its so clean that it makes decent pseudo-lagers, as it attenuates slightly higher then S-05 and leaves you with a "crisper" beer. Oh, I don't think these are true lagers that I am doing. Just ales called lagers like the way MB does so with their golden lager
  22. thanks for all the info guys. my next brews will be a golden lager, american lager, and a pilsner, so US-05 it is.
  23. What's the difference? On amazon it says that 05 has "low to medium" sedimentation and 04 has "high" sedimentation. what is sedimentation?
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