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Christ872

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Everything posted by Christ872

  1. "Brewbirds" post=377460 said:Patience grasshopper... You need a pipeline... [attachment=13663]Pipeline_2013-06-04.JPG[/attachment] To have a pipeline you need to give in to the obsession... [attachment=13664]Obsessed_2013-06-04.JPG[/attachment] Then you will have BEER. :stout: Niiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiice !!!
  2. Christ872

    ABV

    "twyjad" post=377226 said:Is it more expensive to brew? Or buy already made in store? Meh...while some of the other guys are spending about $0.80...I'm probably closer to $1.25-$1.30 per beer. When I look at a beer I really enjoy...Svyturys Ekstra Draught...it sells for $9.49 per 4 pack. Roughly $2.37 per bottle. Even if I put a little more love into my beer I still probably wouldn't spend more than $1.50 or so per beer. == If you talk about the average Budweiser it's roughly $16.50 per case where I live. Roughly 68 or 69 cents per bottle. Cost-wise, it's more expensive to brew...BUT...I'm brewing brewing from the heart and from my taste buds...not my walet. I really, really want to savor and enjoy my drinking indulgence.
  3. +1 To everyone's advice about getting another LBK or two or three. And I would also go out and scrounge up some of those glass beer bottles. While there's nothing wrong with the 1L Mr. Beer bottles, it really feels like the smaller bottles last longer. 22 of the 12oz bottles vs. 8 of the 1L bottles. Same amount of beer...but the 22 stretch out a little longer. I would get another LBK and plan to brew on or around the time you bottle. It looks like you still have 2 or so weeks to get one. With a pipeline built it gets easier. But I agree with it being rough until you have that built.
  4. Checkmate~ I think first things first would be for you to spell out a little more what you mean when you say you want to -- "Looking to get the max out of the recipe and add to my brewing resume". The chart Jim Johnson posted is great and definitely something to log for your notes. Maximum flavor? 22 minutes Maximum Aroma? 7 minutes Maximum grass? Dry hop around 10 or so days What you're trying to achieve is key here. Also, as a lot of folks have said...it is important to know what the original tastes like. But from what I have read of your post...my impression is that it really doesn't matter so much the final product as the process. And if you're talking about the total brewing process...you have an HME, an LME and hops for a hop boil. Identify what you like in a beer and what you want to achieve. A hoppy bitter beer? A more malt-rich beer with an aroma kicker? ======================= 1776 Ale Fourth of July is just around the corner. Brew up a new tradition! MAKES APPROX. 2 GALLONS OF stuff IN ABOUT 3 WEEKS. MAKES 2 GALLONS of good beer in about 7-8 weeks OG: 1.042 (approx.) -- FG: 1.006 (approx.) RECIPE INCLUDES: 1 Can Patriot Lager HME 1 Packet Dry Brewing Yeast (under lid of HME) 1 BrewMax LME Softpack - Smooth 2 1/2 oz. Packets Liberty Hop Pellets 1 Packet Safale US-05 Dry Ale Yeast 1 Muslin Hop Sack 1 Packet No-Rinse Cleanser Based on the info: ABV (alc/vol): 4.7% ...... My guess is that it will actually be closer to 4.3-to-4.5 SRM (Color): 6 IBU (Bitterness): 17 The Patriot has 17 IBUs...so figure that into you recipe. Liberty hops: Based on the Mr. Beer info: ALPHA ACID 4.3%
  5. I have to agree with Ranger in regard to doing it straight up first. And I would only add more malt as a base to add a hop boil. The stuff I have read said that the hoppy-ness of this IPA didn't "pop" like some people expected or wanted. So to add more malt without a hop addition (again based on what I'm reading) would make this strongly sweet. If you are, in fact, bringing up the DME in order to serve as a base to bolster the hop base...then yeah, I see that.
  6. My favorite: [attachment=13581]svyturys_ekstra_draught.jpg[/attachment] And yes...the glass IS etched like that. Because of the unique glass etching, the only label is on the neck of the bottle and it's super-easy to remove. It's also a bit thicker than most American beer bottles. EKSTRA DRAUGHT is the first non-pasteurised beer pioneering the draught beer segment in Lithuania. This supreme premium beer of 5.2% alcohol volume is produced under a unique technology, which allows it to be produced without pasteurisation and is bottled in exceptionally designed unique bottles which preserve the flavour that could previously be enjoyed only in pubs. Therefore, mild in its flavour, this beer is easily drinkable. To my taste I can pick out hints of Aromatic Malt or something very much like it. Aromatic Malt Aromatic is a mildly kilned malt that will add a strong malt aroma and deep color when used as a specialty malt. This malt can make up to 100% of the grain bill, but it is fairly low in surplus diastatic enzymes. 17-21 L
  7. This is just a wild thought...and I apologize if my swing in the dark is way off-base If you accidently used the same amount of sugar in a 12oz glass bottle as you did in a 1L plastic bottle...the PET bottle would obviously be flat. Just a thought since I think I've made that mistake before.
  8. One bit of advice that I'm sure was mentioned, but I probably glossed over...something I think is important: Take notes. Go to staples or wherever and get a notebook or something and take notes. I don't care if you fart while opening the hop package...take a note. Not saying EVERYTHING is important...but if you don't take notes you'll never be able to redo or improve with a point-of-reference. Whatever notes-system you employ...use it to learn and build on the experiences everytime. Record the good, bad, and indifferent.
  9. I strongly agree with Yooper. To me it doesn't much make sense to brew without being able to sample what you're doing. The idea of purchasing a kit and brewing (without sampling for 3 years) doesn't computer. So logic would say you're parents have a point in arguing against your brewing. But as everyone else has alluded to...the point-of-fact whether you have to be 21 to brew or not...you don't. You could brew at 12 if you can manage the stove right. On another technical point, until the yeast has converted the wort into an alcoholic beverage...it's not beer and it's not alcohol. ======= Assuming in being 18 that your at college and not under your parents roof, I'd strongly advise you against it. While it might sound like a great idea being a freshman plebe to brew beer for your future frat buddies...unfortunately, the water you tread there is gonna run real thin real quick. You'll get away with it 95% of the time. Unfortuately in the 5% is you getting kicked out of a school that your folks are helping spend $35K a year on.
  10. Yeah, with the S-05 or fromunda...whichever...it sounds like it shuld be a nice tasting beer. The malt isn't too complex and it should do good to let those hops come through.
  11. Chizzle~ Have you used Mosaic before?? I used it liberally in an English IPA (which turned out excellent) and that description "stone fruit" (in my beer) is plum. It's a delicious tasting and smelling addition...but yeah, plum. Which yeast is "American Ale"...is that a dry yeast or Wyeast or WhiteLabs? With the aroma and flavor you have, I'd make sure the yeast is clean. Just thinking that the fruitier yeasts would muddle the good things you have in the hop components.
  12. I'm drawing off that (propsed) 14D Red IPA category description: Overall Impression: Much sweeter than the traditional American IPA, fuller malt profile and a richer, darker hue with a robust, sweet, toasted malt character that is balanced by a bold, pronounced hop profile. Alcohol content should be fairly high (above 7%) and neither the malt nor hop profiles should dominate the flavor. Comments: The color of the Red IPA should be richer than the American IPA, but may include some overlap. The Red IPA differ from the American IPA not only being darker in color, but also by having more caramel flavor and being slightly roasty, fuller bodied and more evenly balanced malt and bitterness. ======= I was hoping to get all those little nuance flavors to pop...as best as I can.
  13. Ahhh...fark...I don't know. I want the -- It has a special sweet berry-nut flavor and will add a deep golden color with light caramel flavors -- from the Golden Naked Oats......and the light red color and has a medium toffee-like caramel sweetness from the Crystal 40L The idea behind doing them separate is that a concentrated steep of each individually would (I'm thinking) maintain the character of both which not confusing either. I want all of these flavors in the beer (the idea is a Red IPA) but don't want them muffling each other. I want the person/people drinking this beer to be able to pick out "berry-nut" or "Medium toffee" or "Caramel". My concern about steeping them all together would be that...regardless how good the flavor of the beer is...it would be one note of the whole conglomeration. My intent doing them separately would be to maximize the flavor of them separately so that when you combine them you get harmony as opposed to chaos. ============= I'm not averse to wasting the time on this. But if it won't really do much to distinguish anything...I'll just combine them.
  14. Hey guys. Got a bit of a technique question. What do you guys think of steeping 2 grains separately and the adding thing both to the main brew pot once the steep is complete? For example. I'm going to boil 3 or 4 Lb of DME Golden Light To that I want to steep Crystal 40L and Golden Naked Oats. So as to get a get as distinct a quality out of the Golden Naked Oats and $0L as I can...I was thinking of steeping them in separate smaller pots and then adding them to the Larger pot where I will have the DME boiling. Once I combine everything THEN I'll start to work on my hop additions. Just curious.
  15. Agreed. Aside from Wheat beers which are supposed to be cloudy...and maybe some of the black beers Black IPAs or Black Lagers...I cold crash everything.
  16. http://hopsanity.hillcityhomebrew.org/IPA_Style_Guides.html
  17. Michele~ Sorry guys. No. Actually, the 2008 BJCP guidelines IS the most current. Categories 14A, B, and C are the recognized IPA styles. The Black (Cascadian) IPA is not recognized by the BJCP...yet... HOWEVER!! - there are competitions out there looking for Black IPAs and this is the "grading scale" they're going on. They even have fleshed out Red IPA and Belgian (White) IPA details too. Facts being facts...if you're going to enter a beer as a Black IPA in a competition which doesn't specify, then you're going to end up entering it in the Specialty Beer category. Just saying, there are judging bodies out there which have put together these at least a template for the Black IPA.
  18. 14E: Black (Cascadian) IPA Aroma: Prominent hop aromas – Resinous pine, citrus, floral and/or fruity character. Dry hopped character is often present. Clean malty sweetness may be found in the background including hints of roast malt, chocolate and/or mild coffee notes. Roasted malt character should not dominate the aroma. Limited fruity esters are acceptable although a neutral fermentation character is most common. No Diacetyl. Appearance: Deep brown to black some versions can have ruby highlights. Clarity may be difficult to discern in such a dark beer, but when not opaque will be clear (particularly when held up to the light). Head varies from white to tan/khaki and should persist. Flavor: Hop flavor should be medium to high. The balance between citrus like and spicy hop flavor, bitterness, caramel and roast, chocolate or coffee should lean in favor of the hop flavor. Roast character should be subdued. Burnt character is not appropriate. The bitterness may linger into the aftertaste but should not be harsh. The finish should be dry with Caramel malt as a secondary flavor. Diacetyl should not be present. Some clean alcohol flavor can be noted in stronger versions. Mouthfeel: Medium-light to medium bodied, hop bitterness and tannins from roast malts combine to create a dry mouthfeel. Resinous character from high levels of dry hopping may create a tongue coating sensation. Moderate to medium-high carbonation. High astringency and high degree of burnt roast malt character should be absent. Overall Impression: A traditional IPA in terms of the dominant hop contribution to bittering, flavor and aroma. Pacific Northwest hops with citrus, spice and floral characteristics are typical. The roasted character should be muted compared to Porters and Stouts. Finish should be drier than a Porter or Stout. It should drink like an IPA, but have that extra color and slight roast character. Comments: Some brewers prefer to cold steep the dark grains to achieve a very dark beer without the tannin contribution of adding the grains to the mash. The use of Sinamar color extract to enhance the color is common. History: There is some debate as to the origin of the Style. Greg Noonan of Vermont Pub & Brewery in Burlington is frequently cited as brewing the first commercial example in the mid 90's. The Brewers Association introduced the American-Style Black Ale at GABF in 2010. The style is still very much a work in progress. Ingredients: The interaction of the debittered dark malts and citrusy hops like cascade, Simcoe and Amarillo exposed unsuspected flavors. A neutral American Ale yeast should be used. Typical hop selections would be Columbus, Centennial, Chinook, Amarillo, Simcoe and Cascade or hybrids of these like Warrior or Magnum. The main challenge with this beer is to achieve the black color without imparting the acrid grain astringency. To subdue the heavy roast flavors, dehusked malts are frequently employed. Vital Statistics OG: 1.060 – 1.080 FG: 1.010 – 1.016 IBU: 50 – 90 SRM: 30+ ABV: 6.0 – 8.5 Commercial Examples: Firestone Walker Wooky Jack, 21st Amendment Back in Black, Widmer Pitch Black IPA, Dogfish Head Indian Brown Ale, Smuttynose Noonan, Stone’s Sublimely Self-Righteous Ale, Deschutes Hop in the Dark
  19. I always use UPS. FedEx is a no no. And - normally - I label my beer shipments as "Glass Art Project."
  20. "Bluejaye" post=373943 said: There is a good chance you'll be fine, so just relax and ride it out. But there's a much greater chance he will probably have some off flavors.
  21. Congrats on getting started. Those kits (Aztec etc) don't have booster. No booster is fine. Won't hurt. Be prepared for about a 3.2% ABV beer. Hopefully the preparation went well and you learned. Very important to make sure you keep notes as much as possible. See you on/around 6/10 (or that weekend) for bottling.
  22. Well, good thoughts. And then the question then rides into Pale versus Pilsner when you talk about DME and LME. I understand that at that point, you've evolved past the having to remove the DMS. So...is there a different texture or smoothness to either one?? Colorwise, they may only be a point different. So, I'd be curious if you did identical beers side by side (with the only difference being Pale vs Pils) will there be ANY difference in flavor or substance. From BRIESS (DME): CBW® Golden Light Lovibond Flavor Unique Characteristics/Applications 4.0° (8 °Plato) Malty Use in all styles of extract beer and to adjust the gravity of all grain beers. 8.75 °Plato per pound per gallon. Ingredients: Base Malt, Carapils® Malt, Water TYPICAL ANALYSIS Solids ........................................................................... 97% Fermentability ............................................................... 75% FAN (syrup As-Is) ........................................................ 4200 *Color (8º Plato) ............................................ 4.0º Lovibond CARBOHYDRATE PROFILE (100g as-is) (Dry Basis) Glucose ...................................................... 13 ............. 13% Maltose ....................................................... 43 ............. 48% Maltotriose .................................................. 13 ............. 14% Higher Saccharides .................................... 17 ............. 19% INGREDIENTS Malted Barley, Water -- vs-- CBW® Pilsen Light 2.0° (8 °Plato) Subtle malty The lightest pure malted barley extract available commercially. Produces a very crisp, clear wort. 8.75 °Plato per pound per gallon. Ingredients: Pilsen Malt, Carapils® Malt, Water TYPICAL ANALYSIS Solids ........................................................................... 97% Fermentability ............................................................... 75% FAN (syrup As-Is) ........................................................ 3700 *Color (8º Plato) ........................................... 2.0º Lovibond CARBOHYDRATE PROFILE (100g as-is) (Dry Basis) Glucose ...................................................... 13 ............. 13% Maltose ....................................................... 43 ............. 48% Maltotriose .................................................. 13 ............. 14% Higher Saccharides .................................... 17 ............. 19% INGREDIENTS Malted Barley, Water
  23. First things first...I don't think you'll get a 1.063 OG You're basing the information on 3LBs of Munton's Wheat DME (44ppg) in a 2.13 Gallon batch Here's the reason behind my thinking: 1) The precision of 2.13 gallons is pretty exact. Just appreciate that when you deal with projections of exact amount, that real-time implementation may not meet it. 2) It looks like you're calculating a complete 3LB bag. No clumping. Nothing stuck inside the bag. All the DME in the pot. 3) You're using the projection of 44ppg. That may or may not be completely accurate. Be sure to adjust your number in the event it's not. For example, if you do use the full 3Lb bag...and you somehow measure exactly 2.13 gallons...and your final OG is 1.061 then I'd bet you $1 that the PPG is actually 43. === The point here is to be prepared to adjust your numbers.
  24. The best advice I can give is similar to Dave's #2 LEARN In every way you can, learn. If you're going to homebrew - whether it be for fun, for competition, or for personal consumption - invest in learning. And I mean that as a wholly inclusive idea. When you drink you're Miller Lite...think about what you're tasting. What about it does/does not work for you. When you drink a Old Rasputin...what do you pick-up. Be receptive to learning, enjoy it and have fun with it.
  25. Bob~ Welcome. Good to see you're keeping the family history alive. If the opportunity presents itself, I'd advise looking into saving/collecting glass bottles. Toss any twist-off bottles and collect the rest. Although a 1L bottle of beer is fine...having 22-24 of the 12-14 oz bottles just makes you feel better. Plus, if you hit one of out the park, you have more to share with friends...lol
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