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cmcquistion

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About cmcquistion

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  1. bpgreen wrote: I'm curious why you're only doing a single boil. Why no flavor or aroma addition? mashani wrote: Yeah, me as well. Since your using such a clean yeast, there won't be much "flavor" except for the malt, even if the bitterness is more balanced. No particular reason except 18 grams of Cascade is what I happen to have, leftover in my freezer. I want to make sure I up the IBU's on this batch, so it will raise the overall bitterness when I add it to the old batch. The old batch has good flavor, just too much sweetness and not enough bitterness. I could split the hops up and add X amount for bittering, Y amount for flavor, and Z amount for aroma. I just want to make sure I get enough bittering (X) in there. *EDIT* I also have some leftover Aromatic Malt and CaraAmber Malt that I could throw into the mash. I don't really know if I want to go very complex on the malts, though. The old batch has a LOT of malt flavor, so I almost want this new batch to be a bit muted, in terms on malt flavor.
  2. bpgreen wrote: cmcquistion wrote: I bought 3 lbs of two-row malt today and I'm going to mash and boil that tomorrow with some bittering hops, give it a few weeks, then blend with the bad batch at bottling time and re-prime. I'm hoping that the new batch adds in the missing bitterness and enough yeast and priming sugar to properly prime. Thanks for the help everyone! You might want to post the full recipe and get some input. 3 lbs two-row mashed at 152F for an hour (brew in a bag method) then boiled for an hour with 18 grams of Cascade (6.4 AAU) (what I happened to have as leftover hops). Volume of 1.5 gallons. Fermented for 10-14 days with about 5 grams Safale US-05 yeast. I think this should give me around 48 combined IBU's when added to the previous beer (using the Rager formula.) (probably somewhat less than this is reality...)
  3. I bought 3 lbs of two-row malt today and I'm going to mash and boil that tomorrow with some bittering hops, give it a few weeks, then blend with the bad batch at bottling time and re-prime. I'm hoping that the new batch adds in the missing bitterness and enough yeast and priming sugar to properly prime. Thanks for the help everyone!
  4. I've given this some more thought and I see two problems with this current beer. First, it lacks carbonation (I would guess it is about 1.0 volumes CO2, perhaps. Second, however, it also lacks bitterness and hop aroma and is cloyingly sweet. I think the approach of re-bottling with fresh yeast and priming sugar will probably fix the carbonation issue, but it won't address the second issue with bitter/sweet balance. What about this for a plan? What I've got left of this bad beer is about 1.5 gallons. I brew up another small batch (1.5 gallons or so) of a very plain beer with no Crystal or anything, just plain light DME or two-row (if I go with grain). I add enough (leftover) hops to up the IBU's to about twice the necessary amount for 1.5 gallons and boil for an hour. I ferment that for a couple weeks and when it is time to bottle, I add in the old, bad beer, to the bottling bucket and mix these beers up before bottling. That should give me some fresh yeast (from the fresh batch) and I'll add enough priming sugar for the whole 3 gallons. What do you think? Could this work?
  5. bpgreen wrote: cmcquistion wrote: It was 3.3 lbs Briess Golden Light LME (half @ 60, half @ knockout), 4 oz Crystal 40, 12 grams East Kent Goldings @ 60 minutes. All this into 2 gallons total wort split into two 1 gallon carboys with 5 grams S-04 in one and 5 grams US-05 in one. 1.063 OG 1.018 FG (Safale S-04 yeast) 1.016 FG (Safale US-05 yeast) I didn't record how much priming sugar I used though I assume I used the priming calculator here to decide. Fermented for 2 weeks (at 70F) and cold crashed for 2 days before bottling. After bottling, left for almost a month at 70F, before putting a few in the fridge for 2 days. That helps, but you left out some details. How much water did you use four the bill? What were the AA% of the hops? You did just one boil time for an hour? No flavor or aroma boils? I did a full wort boil (about 2.5 gallons to start, boiled down to 2 gallons by the end. I believe the hops were about 4-4.5 AAU. There was not a flavor or aroma hop addition, just the 60 minute bittering addition. mashani wrote: I can't explain why it didn't carbonate if you added priming sugar, unless you cold crashed it at such a low temperature it took out your yeast. But at around 20 IBUs or even less, that is going to be a pretty sweet/malty beer, and the lack of carbonation is going to make it seem even more so, and the priming sugar floating around in there isn't going to help if it didn't ferment. It's hard to say what to do. If you are SURE you primed it, and your sure your bottles were capped properly, then my suggestion would be to get some dry yeast, crack open each bottle, toss in a grain or two, and then re-cap them. You could add more sugar, but if you are SURE you primed it and your caps wern't leaking, then I'm guessing somehow you froze your yeast by accident during your cold crash. If you add more priming sugar, do it sparingly - take the carb level you were intending, and then decide what your max tollarable level is, and only add enough sugar to reach that from where you already primed... So that way if there is still priming sugar floating around in the bottles you won't get bombs, and worst case you will get low carbed beer, but at least carbed somewhat... That's aboout all I can suggest. I think you're on to something. I am 99.9% sure that I primed the bottles. I think maybe I cold-crashed it too cold and killed (or severely diminished) the yeast. I cold crashed it in my regular fridge (around 40-45F, I'm guessing.) It was cold crashed for 2 days. I have some PET bottles and Grolsch flip-top bottles. Perhaps if I add more sugar and/or yeast, I can transfer the beer to those bottles, since they are pretty unlikely to burst.
  6. It was 3.3 lbs Briess Golden Light LME (half @ 60, half @ knockout), 4 oz Crystal 40, 12 grams East Kent Goldings @ 60 minutes. All this into 2 gallons total wort split into two 1 gallon carboys with 5 grams S-04 in one and 5 grams US-05 in one. 1.063 OG 1.018 FG (Safale S-04 yeast) 1.016 FG (Safale US-05 yeast) I didn't record how much priming sugar I used though I assume I used the priming calculator here to decide. Fermented for 2 weeks (at 70F) and cold crashed for 2 days before bottling. After bottling, left for almost a month at 70F, before putting a few in the fridge for 2 days.
  7. I tried to make a "Blonde Ale" with Briesse Golden Light LME and split the batch into two one gallon carboys, pitching 5 grams Safale US-04 in one and 5 grams Safale US-05 in the other. The beer came out darker than expected and I can live with that, but in both batches, the hop bitterness is almost completely absent, the beer is really sweet, and there is NO carbonation. I think I primed, but maybe I didn't use enough priming sugar or something else went wrong. I wrote in my notes that I pitched the yeast pretty hot (75F). Both batches did get pretty good attenuation (about 5.9 ABV at bottling), however. Is there some way I can "fix" this batch? I've got a couple gallons of beer and they aren't very good. Can I pour them all into a new fermenter, dry hop, add a little yeast, give it a few days and prime and bottle? Any ideas? *EDIT* I should add that these have been in the bottle for a month. I tried refrigerating a few bottles for 2 days, then sampling.
  8. I'm going to do a small mash to get some additional malt for an upcoming recipe and I'm wondering how long I have to boil the mash, since it isn't being hopped. The recipe is basically a "use all this leftover stuff" kind of batch. It will have 1 Canadian Draft HME, 2/3 packet of Booster, 1/3 lb DME, 1 lb two-row malt, 1/4 lb CaraAmber malt, and I will add 1 lb Sweet Cherry puree after the first week of fermenting. I'm planing to add the mashed two-row malt and CaraAmber because I'm a bit worried about the batch being too cidery, considering all the adjunct sugar (Booster and Cherry puree). I was planning on doing a 1 hr mash with the two row and CaraAmber and then boiling that for 15 minutes (for sterilization mainly) before adding the Booster, DME, and HME. I have a few leftover hops I could use (some Kent Goldings, Fuggles, and Amarillo) but I'm worried that since it is a fruit beer, I don't want to over-hop it and the Canadian Draft HME already has ~some~ hops. (Any thoughts on that?) Is a 15 minute boil going to be sufficient for the grain, or do I need to boil longer for reasons other than mash sterilization?
  9. How long is quite a while? I have a bag of Aromatic Malt and a bag of Cara Amber that I bought for some recipes that just needed part of a pound of grain. I'm keeping them in a box in my pantry and I don't have another recipe lined up to use them in, yet.
  10. Elsteve-o wrote: IMHO the booster recipes arent that great at all. I like the premium refills. I suggest you use those. Did you prime with honey by chance? I primed this batch w/ standard cane sugar, as they suggested (but I rack to a slimline and do batch priming for all my batches.)My second batch (Bill's Brew) has some honey in it (though I used cane sugar again for priming). Those first two batches used Booster and in batch 11 and 12, I used 2/3 booster and 1/3 lb light DME. All of my other batches have used LME or DME or have been all grain.
  11. My first Mr Beer batch was a Cowboy Golden Lager (w/ Booster), prepared according to the standard instructions. I let it ferment for 13 days, then cold crashed for 2 days, then bottled. After 2 weeks, I took one and put it in the fridge. Tried that one 2 days later and it had very little carbonation and was cidery and dull. I knew it was still young, so I continued to age the rest of the batch. After a full 4 weeks of carbing/conditioning, I put a few bottles in the fridge for 2 days. Just tried one and it has better carbonation now (not a great head, but much better than 2 weeks ago), but it is still cidery and dull. Any way to fix or improve this batch or does Cowboy Golden Lager (w/ Booster) just suck?
  12. I've read some guidelines about 2-2-2 and several different explanations for what that meant. One explanation said "ferment for 2 weeks, carbonate (at room temp) for 2 weeks, lager (at around 60F) for 2 weeks." The second explanation said "ferment for 2 weeks, carbonate (at room temp) for 2 weeks, refrigerate for 2 weeks." The third explanation said "ferment for 2 weeks, carbonate (at room temp) for 4 weeks, refrigerate for 2-3 days." Which one is right? If the first one is right, how long should the brews be refrigerated before drinking. (I know that different styles will be different, but what's the common wisdom?)
  13. genotype wrote: cmcquistion wrote: I'm going to be adding my fruit puree in a few days (after 7 days of fermentation). When I add it to the fermenter, should I pour it in carefully, to not add any more oxygen (and chance for contamination) or should I pour it in and stir up the wort, complete with unsettling the trub, to get the fruit well mixed in, adding some oxygen to help the second-stage fermentation? Pour it in carefully and try not to splash. You do not want to introduce oxygen into the wort. Does the puree need to be stirred in to the wort? Does the trub need to be roused to get the yeast active again?
  14. I'm going to be adding my fruit puree in a few days (after 7 days of fermentation). When I add it to the fermenter, should I pour it in carefully, to not add any more oxygen (and chance for contamination) or should I pour it in and stir up the wort, complete with unsettling the trub, to get the fruit well mixed in, adding some oxygen to help the second-stage fermentation?
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