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charlieb

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Everything posted by charlieb

  1. "Trollby" post=373540 said:Just an FYI..... When I sparge I get over 75% efficiency doing BIAB, without more like 70%. Much better beers too. I know it makes more steps and BIAB is suppose to be a "1 pot" method, I just like better efficiency But this could only be done with select recipes I suppose. For instance if my grain bill is 12lbs, there is no way to do that in a 7.5 gallon pot right?
  2. "Joechianti" post=373526 said:I have to totally agree with Trollby. You should be able to do a 5 gallon BIAB in a 7.5 gallon pot, if you would like to. I suppose that is my confusion. I initially thought the same but read in a few other forums you needed a bigger kettle. I guess I'm confused on the whole rinse/sparge portion for BIAB. I thought the whole idea of BIAB was not having to involve this as you did everything in your pot???
  3. I am starting the switch to All Grain. I have a 7.5 Gallon brew pot. Naturally I am thinking of doing a BIAB for my first batch and my pot is too smal to do a 5 gallon batch. I have been scouring the net looking for a decent library of BIAB recipes with little to no luck. Curious to what peeps may suggest in terms of recipes and tips? I have thought about halving some nice recipes I have found online but worry about accurate measurements. Not sure I can weigh out 0.13oz of hops lol
  4. "Brewbirds" post=366097 said:Charlie, If I remember correctly from other posts you have a LHBS nearby. You might see if they have a bin where customers can bring the empty vials in for freecycling. Mine has and it is sometimes over flowing with empty White Labs vials. If not they might help you get some from local home brewers. No need to buy them and pay shipping if you can get some free. I do have one. They don't sell the vials though. But I will check next time I am in there. Maybe I will get lucky. That is a good tip Brewbirds.
  5. "Screwy Brewer" post=366086 said: "Jim Johnson" post=366076 said: "charlieb" post=366066 said:I don't have any of those vials. How tall are those vials Screwy? 7 inches? 8? I'm playing the eyeball game with my pint jars. the vials hold 13 oz.. so by what screwy said he probably gets 9 or 10 oz of yeast in his the rest being the old beer /water. i intend to use 16 oz pet bottles but the pint jar will work also The White Lab vials hold a little less than 1.5 ounces and measure 1 inch by 4.5 inches long. [img size=250]https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-VaVxezjhsa4/UWhj4kCLI9I/AAAAAAAAHPE/VXTdzyPrbvM/s762/IMAG0305.jpg White Lab Yeast Vials With Washed YeastAh ha that is what I needed. Basically I have 8 pint jars and each has about a 1/2 inch of yeast. So before I get vials and figure out a better process for myself I'm trying to guestimate how many of my jars to use. thanks
  6. "Jim Johnson" post=366076 said: "charlieb" post=366066 said:I don't have any of those vials. How tall are those vials Screwy? 7 inches? 8? I'm playing the eyeball game with my pint jars. the vials hold 13 oz.. so by what screwy said he probably gets 9 or 10 oz of yeast in his the rest being the old beer /water. i intend to use 16 oz pet bottles but the pint jar will work also If that is the case it looks like I'll be combining about 5 of my pint jars together for my first starter
  7. I don't have any of those vials. How tall are those vials Screwy? 7 inches? 8? I'm playing the eyeball game with my pint jars.
  8. Got it. Now I just need to figure out how much yeast I need from my pint jars
  9. "Screwy Brewer" post=366003 said: "charlieb" post=365874 said:Just curious if a pint jar is enough yeast for a 2.5 batch? I don't mean a full pint. But whatever amount of yeast you may have from washing minus adding into tubes like Screwy is doing. For a 2.5 gallon batch of beer of 5% alcohol beer you need about 100 billion viable yeast cells, which is about what ships in a new vial of White Labs - 001 yeast. If I remember correctly those new tubes are packed to within an inch of the top with compacted yeast and the rest with beer.When filling my tubes with compacted yeast the best I can hope to get is filling the tubes 2/3 of the way to the top with yeast cells and the remaining 1/3 with watered down beer, or about 75 billion cells give or take a billion. After subtracting a 10% cell die off rate a month I typically use 2 of my vials in a 2 liter starter, so you would use half that amount. OK so you are saying you use two vials in a 2 liter starter. But is that for a 5 gallon? Or LBK? Also how many pint jars does it typically take you extract the yeast from to fill up your vial? 2? 3? I don't have the vials yet so I"m picking your brain a bit. I will be making my first attempt at creating a starter and want to be as close to the 100 billion as I can.
  10. Just curious if a pint jar is enough yeast for a 2.5 batch? I don't mean a full pint. But whatever amount of yeast you may have from washing minus adding into tubes like Screwy is doing.
  11. I was thinking the same things but really wasn't sure. I also tried to do a Google search without much luck. Just curious
  12. Does anyone know the difference between these two? I have been buying a few items from an online site and they only have the German 2 row. Am curious to what the flavor profile difference may be if any.
  13. Key word "investment" lol. Would love to however the wife says otherwise
  14. I get what you are saying. But we are more talking about temperature ranges and controlling them, not flavor profiles in relation to temperatures. My goal is better temperature control. I never want to worry if my temp is too high.
  15. "Foothiller" post=363002 said:One thing that could help in the summer months is to use Coopers Ale yeast, which multiple posts on forums that can be found through Google say is OK up to 80 degrees, although with fruity flavors. I used Coopers Ale yeast last year with good results. Another is to use saison yeast, which is sometimes used well above that. This summer my plan is to make 3-4 saisons and a few fruit beers that are supposed to have those esters. Another summer strategy is to keep damp t-shirts over the LBK, even putting that in a tub of water so the water can wick up the t-shirt. It's funny you say this. I just pitched Cooper's yeast last night. First time I've used it. Yeast pack says about 69 - 80 degrees. Lots of wiggle room. I'm using this batch to monitor my temps. Right now it seems to be peaking. 4 frozen water bottles and I'm at 71 degrees. Normally with four bottles in my cooler I'd be around 65-66 area.
  16. All great information. I will just have to experiment and keep an eye on it. Luckily I work at home, and in my office are my fermenting LBK's. So it is easy to keep an eye on it. I worry about that spike though while I'm sleeping. Summer months are about here and my wife doesn't allow for the temp to be much cooler than 77 so I have to constantly keep on it.
  17. wow up to 10 degrees? Gotta plan for that I suppose
  18. Wondering if anyone can tell me a ballpark number of how much in degrees your wort increases to during fermentation? 5 Degrees? 7? I understand there are variables such as OG and such. But just would like a general idea. I keep my LBK in coolers during fermentation with frozen water bottles. So I'm trying to do a rough calculation of temps so I can regulate as best as possible. Thanks
  19. You keep your house at 72 degrees? Hmmmm.....my wife can't take it beyond 78. I'm usually sweating in my house.
  20. "Kealia" post=357532 said:I've never done it but I suppose you COULD. Malts is malts A typical starter gravity is about 1.036 - 1.042 ideally and if you're making a 1L starter I would guesstimate between 1/4 and 1/3 of the can for it. Some people do put hops in their starters so I suppose you could get away with using the HME. You would want to pitch this starter at high krausen though versus letting it ferment out. Probably in the 18 hour range. If you need to make a starter but don't have access to buy DME or LME from a local shop you may want to include some on your next order. Likewise, you may try using the chat feature on the site to talk to one of the brewmasters (Diane, etc.) to see what they say. I'm guessing the quick answer is "don't use the HME" but that might be because they want to keep things simple. You could press them for an answer if you are comfortable doing starters already. I didn't think about that, but you are saying wait a good 18 hours give or take for a nice krausen, then pitch this into your wort when set? Also, what type of container do you guys recommend to do a starter in? You mentioned a 1L starter. Could that be in a sanitized soda bottle or something?
  21. And would I leave out my yeast out a day or so to get to room temp, then make my starter with it?
  22. Just started washing/saving my yeast. I see a lot of mention using a yeast starter. I am wondering if this is necessary? Can I not leave my yeast out for 24 hours to hit room temperature then pitch into my wort?
  23. Not real sure how he does it. When I tried the baster, the liquid just falls back in when I try to take it out. It doesn't stay in the baster. Gravity.........
  24. "haerbob3" post=349888 said:I used them strait up for MR B batches. If I remember the directions called for a fair sized sugar addition How did it turn out? Well assuming you can recall
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