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asnider

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Everything posted by asnider

  1. "onekyds" post=380464 said:I fermented it 3 weeks, and carbonated it 4, normally I keep my beer in the fridge 2 weeks before drinking it. I tried one out today, it is good, but not my favorite. OK, cool. I just wanted to make sure that you making a mistake and getting bad beer as a result. :whistle:
  2. "Foothiller" post=380354 said:Note that maltodextrin is almost unfermentable, so 7 oz may have an effect on your FG that you may or may not want. But I can't say that 7 oz would be wrong. It will be interesting to hear your outcome, so please let us know how it turns out. I'm aware of that. I've only used it once before, so I'm experimenting. We'll see how it goes, I guess. This batch should be done fermenting in the next few days, so I should be able to report back soon.
  3. "Foothiller" post=380351 said:I have used maltodextrin a few times but have had a hard time figuring out how much to use. How much to use seems to be affected by other variables in the recipe, which I haven't sorted out yet. 2 oz may or may not be enough. My advice is to try 2 oz like you were considering, and adjust it in similar future recipes if 2 oz is not enough. I already went ahead and used 7oz, instead, based on the instructions on the package. We'll see how it turns out, I suppose.
  4. Dry hopped today. I decided to go nuts and use up what I had left of the East Kent Goldings, since they're getting old and losing some of their potency. That means I've dry hopped with a full ounce of pellets for a 2 gallon batch. That should give me some really nice hop aroma. I don't think it'll be overkill since, like I said, the hops aren't as fresh as would be ideal.
  5. "onekyds" post=380327 said:My first batch of Spring Seasonal went in the fridge Friday, in about two weeks I will be sampling it, I will know then what it is like. Why two weeks in the fridge? You're not trying to carb and condition it in the fridge are you? That won't work. The yeast will go dormant and the beer will stay flat. You need to condition it at room temperature.
  6. "mashani" post=379039 said:I posted the recipe that I'm going to use to totally destroy / bastardize / demolish / mangle and/or mutilate my second can in the advanced recipe topic. If you have 2 LBKs, and you like hoppy saisons, and you don't like this beer as an IPA, it may be worth a read for ideas on how to frankenbier a second can and get twice as much beer. (I'm 99% sure it's going to make good beer). Not 100%? Well, I'd better let you try it first then.
  7. "BlackDuck" post=378003 said:I really don't know what happened then. It fermented in the high 60's and I pitched the entire packet according to Fermentis directions. All I know is mine is full of banana. Oh well, I will drink them eventually!!!! Edit...maybe the high FG has something to do with it???? That almost makes me want to intentionally let the next batch ferment toward the high end of the range, since SWMBO loves banana flavours in her wheat beers.
  8. Very similar, yes. My overflow isn't as bad, so it doesn't sound as "wet," but it's basically the same sound.
  9. "snakefetus" post=377793 said:Yeah its totally the gas venting out. That last blowout I experienced the sounds coming from my airlock were hilarious. I'm curious to know how yours turns out...When I made a coopers in an LBK it came out horribly bitter....Almost un-drinkable...almost. I'm curious, too. I went with the Canadian Blonde because it is fairly lightly hopped when done as a 5-gallon batch. I'm hopping that it will end up being similar to a pale ale in the end. Or maybe it'll be undrinkable. We'll see...
  10. I've got a big beer in the LBK right now (well, sort of big...it's a Coopers 3.75lb HME that I decided to do as an LBK-sized batch). There's a lot of krausen. A bit has dribbled out the vents by the lid of the LBK. But now I keep hearing a sound like gas is being vented off. Is that my LBK? Is it venting CO2? Or am I imagining things and/or completely losing my mind?
  11. "OikoEco" post=377457 said:Curiosity got the best of me and I sampled one at 2.5 weeks in the bottle. Since this essentially a wheat beer (albeit a bit of a unique one), that's probably not a problem. Wheats usually condition out quicker, don't they?
  12. "teutonic terror" post=377444 said:Had one a couple of weeks ago I never saw the krausen on. It was a low ABV brew. I figured the fact that this is a low ABV brew might have something to do with it. Less malt for the yeast to munch on = less krausen.
  13. I was thinking about pulling a hydro sample. I may just do that.
  14. Thanks for the reassurance, guys. I was pretty sure it would be fine, but I think I needed to hear it from some more experienced brewers.
  15. I brewed up my Wee Amber Ale on the weekend and, while there does appear to be some trub forming at the bottom of the LBK (tough to tell, but shining a flashlight in does appear to reveal a thin trub cake), I haven't seen any signs of krausen: no foam, no krausen ring, nothing. I used Coopers Ale Yeast bought from the grocery store on this one. I'm worried that, since the yeast was from the grocery store instead of my LHBS, it might be old yeast. It does appear to be fermenting, since there seems to be trub, so I should probably RDWHAHB, but I'm pretty sure that Coopers yeast and Mr. Beer yeast are the same strain. The fact that I usually see lots of krausen and/or a krausen ring with my Mr. Beer batches, but nothing with this batch, is making me paranoid. Is it possible that there is an issue, or should I stop perving and RDWHAHB?
  16. "Kealia" post=377362 said:Here is the really interesting thing: As I suspected, this thing fermented more once I added the priming sugar. My FG when I bottled was 1.021 after 22 days in the LBK. I tried rousing the yeast and warming it up but that is where it finished. I poured some of my beer into my hydrometer last night and let it go flat overnight so I could measure it this morning - - - - - 1.014. That confirmed what I thought after opening the first bottle and getting a VERY high level of carb (like a wheat). I had a concern in the back of my head that this might happen, so I made the decision to bottle in plastic instead of glass for this batch. I figured that if I ended up with bottle bombs, it would be safer to have plastic bottles exploding than glass ones. I'm looking forward to this one, but expecting high levels of carbonation due to the fact that it seems to be already partially carbed right out of the LBK (as others have already mentioned).
  17. Can someone point me toward the olive oil tip being discussed? I tried doing a forum search but couldn't find it.
  18. "Alapai K" post=376848 said:how long do you typicaly chill the beer before drinking? 24 - 48 hours.
  19. After having the LBK upstairs in a warmer room for approximately 24 hours, I took a hydro sample. It's still at 1.020. I don't think it's going any lower than that, so I guess I'll bottle it. I'm a bit disappointed that the numbers don't have up with what Mr Beer claims. I'm wondering, for my second batch, if it might make sense to only pitch half of the yeast and then, after a week, pitch the second half of the package. 11g is way more than is necessary for an LBK anyway, so I'm thinking that if I let half a pack do the heavy lifting during the primary fermentation, adding the second half afterward might allow it to "finish up" whatever the first batch didn't get and come down to a lower FG. Does that sound like it would work? I'm still learning, so it that's a ridiculous idea, please let me know.
  20. Just a few more minor tweaks on this one. I decided to use 0.50oz of the sterling hops (to finish what I had left), instead of just 0.25oz. In retrospect, I probably should have used the sterling for my bittering hop and the golding for my flavour, but hindsight is 20/20. I enjoy the flavour of sterling, so I think this will still turn out OK. I also used Coopers Ale Yeast, not the Muntons Standard. I mixed up what I had on hand. But I think the Coopers yeast will do fine for this brew. Here's the updated and "final" recipe for this batch. Wee Amber Ale ------------- Brewer: Adam Snider Style: American Amber Ale Batch: 2.00 gal Extract Characteristics --------------- Recipe Gravity: 1.033 OG Recipe Bitterness: 38 IBU Recipe Color: 10° SRM Estimated FG: 1.008 Alcohol by Volume: 3.2% Alcohol by Weight: 2.5% Ingredients ----------- Amber DME 1.23 lb, Extract, Extract Light DME 0.25 lb, Extract, Extract Kent Goldings (U.K.) - Aroma and dry hop intensely resiny, candy-like, sweet, slightly floral and spicy 0.50 oz, Pellet, 45 minutes Sterling - Zpicy, herbal hop with a hint of citrus. Can be used as both a bittering and aroma hop 0.50 oz, Pellet, 20 minutes Kent Goldings (U.K.) - Aroma and dry hop intensely resiny, candy-like, sweet, slightly floral and spicy 0.50 oz, Pellet, 0 minutes Maltodextrin 7.00 unit, Other, Unit = 1oz Coopers Ale Yeast 1.00 unit, Yeast, Temperature Range: 65°-75° F 7 GRAMS Notes ----- Recipe Notes: Hop addition at 0 minutes = dry hops at 14 days in LBK Maltodextrin is to improve body and mouthfeel. Batch Notes: Hop pellets used weren't very fresh, since this was a "use up the ingredients" batch. Fresher hops will yield a better result if this brew is attempted again in the future.
  21. I'm now at 28 days in the LBK and it's only down to 1.020 even after trying to rouse the yeast by (gently) rocking the LBK. I'm going to move it upstairs where it's warmer for about 24 hours and then I'll bottle it regardless of what my SG reading is at that time.
  22. Although, I'm looking at the 500g (roughly 1lb) bag that I bought and it says to use the entire bag in a 5 gallon batch. So, perhaps I should up the amount of malto-dextrin that I use after all. Also, I had the AA% for the hops wrong. Here's the updated recipe: Wee Amber Ale ------------- Brewer: Adam Snider Style: American Amber Ale Batch: 2.00 gal Extract Characteristics --------------- Recipe Gravity: 1.033 OG Recipe Bitterness: 33 IBU Recipe Color: 10° SRM Estimated FG: 1.008 Alcohol by Volume: 3.2% Alcohol by Weight: 2.5% Ingredients ----------- Amber DME 1.23 lb, Extract, Extract Light DME 0.25 lb, Extract, Extract Kent Goldings (U.K.) - Aroma and dry hop intensely resiny, candy-like, sweet, slightly floral and spicy 0.50 oz, Pellet, 45 minutes Sterling - Zpicy, herbal hop with a hint of citrus. Can be used as both a bittering and aroma hop 0.25 oz, Pellet, 20 minutes Kent Goldings (U.K.) - Aroma and dry hop intensely resiny, candy-like, sweet, slightly floral and spicy 0.50 oz, Pellet, 0 minutes Maltodextrin 7.00 unit, Other, Unit = 1oz Muntons Standard 1.00 unit, Yeast, Temperature Range: 64°-68° F 6 GRAMS Notes ----- Recipe Notes: Hop addition at 0 minutes = dry hops at 14 days in LBK Maltodextrin is to improve body and mouthfeel. Batch Notes: Hops not very fresh; use fresher hops if future batches are brewed.
  23. Yeah, I'd fill it to the 2 gallon mark. I figured anything higher than that might end up diluting it a bit too much, since it is already a small beer. I've used malto-dextrin once before (in conjunction with dextrose, as a substitute for Booster in a recipe that called for it) and used approximately 2oz in that batch. It seemed to work well. From the bit of research I've done about malto-dextrin, it appears that 1oz per gallon is a good ration, but if anyone has different advice, I'm happy to listen!
  24. I like sterlings, based on the past brews I've used them in, but I'm curious how they'll work in an amber.
  25. Just bumping this up, in case people missed it earlier (I posted it in the wrong forum, originally, but asked the mods to move it over here).
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