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Creeps McLane

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Everything posted by Creeps McLane

  1. That is the coolest thing I've ever seen. Thank you!!! I wasn't seeing certain hops and things too. Fixed everything
  2. New to Qbrew. Anyone have a chart translating MRB HME into grain specifics I can put into Qbrew? Looking for WDA for this specific recipe
  3. Same here, I have my controller set to 65. I check it every day and it's spot on. The brew de ale ze bub is sitting right next next to it. They must've been goofing off and things got out of control. That's the only thing I can think of
  4. Shouldnt have blew. Well, 1.060 is pretty high, Itll be the highest ABV beer Ive brewed so far. And highest IBUs by far.
  5. Nm it was 11.5 grams of yeast. Had to dig the package out of the garbage to be sure.
  6. I did the same except I have mine in a glass carboy. OG was 1.060
  7. Brewed on Friday night, woke up Saturday to a very nice start of krausen. Sunday morning woke up to find my blow off tube couldn't handle the load and my fermentation fridge has krausen all over it. Blow off blew right off... Hopefully it wasn't exposed for too long.
  8. What's a good stout yeast that's not a liquid. I can only find Irish ale yeast that's liquid. Sad face
  9. I just brewed the original recipe from the first post. I waited a few weeks to do this one and I don't think I'll be disappointed. Wife says the whole house stinks, I think it smells wonderful. Thanks for the recipe
  10. Oh and I almost guarantee your yeast is dead
  11. I hydrate my yeast all the time. I recommend at the beginning of brew day microwaving a cleaned and sterilized measuring cup of water until boiling. Cover with a sterilized piece of aluminum foil in the fridge. Brew your beer and drop a little LME or HME in the glass. Then check the temp of the measuring cup water. If it's too high, then I make an ice bath and use it for my wort and measuring cup. Obviously keep an eye on the temp so it doesn't get too cold while its in the fridge or ice bath. Keep it covered the whole time it's cooling down. Then chuck the yeast in and watch for a slight foam. No stirring yet. I watch for foam and a little cloud in the measuring cup wort as the yeast falls to the bottom. If you get any of that after 10 or so minutes then you're good. Pitch and wait.
  12. I only notice this with overcarbed beer. If I do it right then I agree with you
  13. Here's what I know: my beers that have been on the high side of carbonation only should be in the fridge for three days prior to drinking. The longer they sit in the cold, the more head I get when I pour. Now, I have had a batch of CAL in my fridge for months now and that stuff gets better and better. Carbonation seems about the same as earlier bottles. I'll honestly say too that after 4 months or so, the green apple taste had reduced. I took a beer I had bottles and chilled for 2 months or so vs the same batch that was room temp for 2 months, cracked them both and the cold one fizzed right out of the bottle while the warm one did barely anything.
  14. Will I overflow my LBK with all that malt? MB stout and 3.3 breiss?
  15. Here's what I'm thinking 1 can of Irish stout 1 smooth soft pack 2 oz of cocoa nibs 1 oz E Kent goldings Really thinking about skipping the soft pack and dumping in another Irish stout HME or a breiss 3.3 lb can of porter or something else. Get that baby all kinds of blood warming for the winter. Any thoughts? Brewing in a few days
  16. Did my first hop stand today actually after some studying last night. Made the brew de ale ze bub with the 1/2 oz of centennial hops. Did a 45 minute hop stand at about 170 degrees give or take. Really liked the process. I thought it slowed down brew day a bit and allowed me plenty of time to proof my yeast and watch the packers lose. Might have thought of slym once or twice and said to myself "hops go commando"
  17. try buying another LBK and batch priming with corn sugar. Beats shoving sugar cubes down Bottle necks and I think batch priming is easier too. plus LBKs are only $10. use the screwy brewer calculator. And then you have another LBK... I mean, isnt that amazing in itself??? Oh and read Rickbeer's signatures, duh
  18. SOB.... I'm looking for the perfect way to end the green apple taste. To be honest, I've had 2 batches recently that taste like straight sugar water. They fermented and everything but as soon as I popped the top I knew I was screwed. Which leads me to one of the most important things I've learned so far : taste your beer from your final hydrometer reading. I would've save a lot of time had I done that with those two batches I'm pitching my yeast at the right temp, fermenting at the right temp for three weeks. Starting to think it has something to do with my water or something. Clearly it has nothing to do with me since I'm nearly perfect
  19. But also is whirl floc the answer to my problems? I was going to make a MB recipe and I want to go get some as long as I know how to use it in an HME recipe
  20. I thought it was interesting that there's many ways to help reduce off flavors. And that there is a benefit to cold crashing like you do Rick. I guess this whole time people said "to reduce haziness" I never knew that the haze is what's creating this flavor that I do not enjoy
  21. When would you add the whirl floc? At flameout when you add your HME? Or would you boil it for 5 min before adding it? When using nothing but HME?
  22. Astringency is a mouthfeel associated with tannins, and is commonly found in tea, young red wine, really hoppy beers, especially dry hopped brews, and grainy and unbalanced beers. Tea astringency can be rectified with milk. Wine astringency can be reduced with egg white finings. And beer astringency can be associated with haze in finished beer. The common element of these three examples is reaction with proteins. Tea tannins react with milk proteins, wine tannins react with egg proteins, and hop tannins react with malt proteins to form haze. And tannins bind with proteins in the mouth to cause that unpleasant texture associated with astringent foods and beverages. The solution to astringency is protein-tannin interaction. The general idea is to get those tannins that will, given the chance, assault your palate to embrace another protein and gracefully exit the scene before you keg or bottle your beer. Cold temperature also helps with this process and explains why aged lagers are rounder than young lagers. Things you can use at home to combat your astrin-gent alt include PVPP (a protein analog), cold aging, isinglass, egg whites, and time. isinglass - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isinglass
  23. that is the coolest thing I have ever seen. Fist bump to you my friend
  24. This is like my dream. I need this BK in my life asap. Think of the possibilities!!!! Same styles with different hops or yeasts even... Amazon Xmas list being created tonight
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