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the sloth

Where’s the Krausen?

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Brewed the cowboy honey wheat last night. I have been successfully fermenting my brews in the basement which was clocking in around ~68 degrees for a few months. When I went down there last night, I noticed the temp was now sitting in the low 60s which I thought might be too cold so for the first time I parked the keg it in a dark hallway closet upstairs that sits around 71 degrees.

When I checked in on it this morning I was disappointed and concerned that I saw no visual signs of fermentation. Every other beer I have brewed had taken off by the next morning. Poking around the web I get the sense I shouldn’t be overly concerned just yet, but I thought I would at least describe the situation here to see if anyone has any insight or advice. Hoping the yeast is not bad…

Thanks in advance.

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check to see if you're developing a yeast cake on the bottom. sometimes you miss the foaming portion...comes and goes quickly.

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Guest

U probably missed it. If there's trub at the bottom, it's a working.
I just did up a munton's red ale kit. 5 gallon kit. I split it between 2 MrB kegs. One keg I used the whole 6 grams yeast included, the other 6 grams of US-05. The US-05 went to town, blew out about a cup the first 24 hours. The other, no krausen at all, but has some trub. It's probably doing it's thing, patience grasshopper, patience.

:lol::lol:

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Some find it at the bottom of a beer bottle...problem is, not all of them have this "patience" in them. So at times, quite a few must be searched in order to find it. WARNING: This action may cause numerously harvested bottles to be produced. Other side effects may include "hic"...

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Patience.. buy several cases of *non* screw top brews. Every time u want to open the keg top, move the keg, or otherwise mess with it, open a brew, drink it down. If the urge to mess with keg continues, open another brew. Keep this up until the urge goes away, even if it takes 10-12 brews to contain the urge. Continue this until you have a good pipeline built up. You will have learned what patience means by then. LOL

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Low 60s is actually a great temperature for fermentation. In my opinion, it's better to ferment in the low 60s than the high 60s.

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With the MB yeast, this may be applicable:

Ferments well between 59-75 deg F. Excellent in beers with alcohol contents up to 7.5%, but can ferment up to 11.5%.

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I brewed up an allgrain mash on friday night. On saturday, I saw no krausen. All day long, nothing. I really started to think, "for the first time ever, on batch #62, I may have forgotten to pitch the yeast". I'd had a number of home brews during the brewing process, so I couldn't remember, heh heh. The yeast inventory in my fridge supported the fact that I had indeed pitched the yeast. It is 62 deg in my basement where I now have the fermenters. Saturday night I went back down and .... and ... VOILA! Krausen. I don't think I've ever fermented in a cool room before, last Jan and Feb, I had the fermenters up in my bedroom where it's warm.

I want to keep an eye on the temp in my "basement brewery", because that's where I really want everything to be. I'm getting a slop sink installed (won't need a pump, the main drain goes below the floor level in basement), and want to get an induction burner, hoping that it can boil at least three gallons of water.

To crank up the heat in the basement uses a lot of fuel, so if the temp hangs below 60, I'll have to put the fermenters back in my bedroom for the winter, which is no big deal, just a lot of running up and down two flights on bottling day, getting stuff.

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Tabasco wrote:

...I want to keep an eye on the temp in my "basement brewery", because that's where I really want everything to be....To crank up the heat in the basement uses a lot of fuel, so if the temp hangs below 60, I'll have to put the fermenters back in my bedroom for the winter...

Could you just use a different yeast - one that works well at cooler temps? The "basement brewery" sounds pretty awesome. Would hate to see you have to move your operation back upstairs.

Nice to have you back Tabasco. Haven't heard from you in a week or so.

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packerduf wrote:

Tabasco wrote:

...I want to keep an eye on the temp in my "basement brewery", because that's where I really want everything to be....To crank up the heat in the basement uses a lot of fuel, so if the temp hangs below 60, I'll have to put the fermenters back in my bedroom for the winter...

Could you just use a different yeast - one that works well at cooler temps? The "basement brewery" sounds pretty awesome. Would hate to see you have to move your operation back upstairs.

Nice to have you back Tabasco. Haven't heard from you in a week or so.

+1 Safale S-04 and US-05 are good down to 59F and Nottingham is good down to 57F (or 54F if you overpitch). Below that, you can switch to a lager yeast. I brew in my basement too. I try to keep temps below 62 most of the time and use US-05 or Nottingham for most batches.

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