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packerduf

Paulaner Hefe-Weizen Clone

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Finally got around to this recipe. Wanted to cut my teeth on this prior to the Smithwicks Clone attempt.

Recipe Paulaner Hefe-Weizen Clone
Style Weizen/Weissbier
Brewer packerduf
Batch 2.13 gal Extract

Recipe Gravity 1.053 OG
Estimated FG 1.013 FG
Recipe Bitterness 14 IBU
Alcohol by Volume 5.1%
Recipe Color 5° SRM

0.25 lb Munich (German) Steeped
3.00 lb Wheat LME
0.50 oz Hersbrucker (Germany), Pellet, 45 minutes
Safbrew WB-06 Dry Wheat Yeast

1. Steeped 4oz German Munich Malt in 1/2 gal water for 20 minutes @155 degrees.
2. Added water to the brew pot for 1 gal total volume, brought to boil, and removed from heat.
3. Added 3 lbs. wheat LME, brought to boil, then added 1/2 oz German Hallertau Hersbrucker hops for 45 minute boil.
4. Cooled in ice bath for 15 minutes, transfered to fermenter, and added cold water for 8.5 qts total volume.

Note: Using above quantities of water resulted in wort cooling to 80 degrees in 15 minute ice-bath.

Everything went well. I actually made two separate MB-sized batches. Second batch went a little smoother, after tweeking my water quantities. I increased the steeping grains from the original recipe, and omitted the sparge.

My only worry is if I altered the LME (unhopped) significantly by boiling the entire amount with the hops (45 min). The LME was purchased from bulk, so I thought it would be better to boil it.

Your feedback on this issue, and entire recipe/process (above) would be much appreciated. I need to nail down my process before I attempt the coveted Smithwicks Clone (I will be using DME for that). THANKS!

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I agree with boiling the bulk LME. I don't believe that boiling 3 lbs. of wheat LME in one gallon of water for 45 minutes would carmelize it significantly. It might darken slightly, but you would be the one to judge that by visual inspection during the boil. You, of course, would have offset that by adding additional water to compensate for boil-off. Wheats are not my thing, but it is sound brewing.

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Good to hear Sham. Thanks for the feedback. I'm not usually hot on Wheat Beers either, but I picked up this recipe and the ingredients as part of a "package deal". Later, I bought a 6-pack to see what I was getting into. The first one was just okay. But it seemed the more I drank it, the more I liked it. Hope this clone recipe comes close.

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I use bulk LME a lot and only boil some of it with the hops if I do a hop boil. I asked at the LHBS and they said there's no need to boil it, but if you want to do so, it won't hurt, other than possibly darken it a little.

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Coming on late here ... sorry... I have used the WB-06 and Danstar Munich Wheat and the Danstar is by far the better yeast for a German wheat. I did not care for the WB-06.

I just did an American Wheat and used a Wyeast liquid 1010 ( American Wheat ) still conditioning so I can't compare it yet.

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Thnx for posting this recipe, I am going to try it in the next few days. Paulaner Hefe Weizen is the greatest beer invented. Hopefully this recipe will come close.

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beersnob wrote:

Thnx for posting this recipe, I am going to try it in the next few days. Paulaner Hefe Weizen is the greatest beer invented. Hopefully this recipe will come close.

Beersnob;

I wanted to post the original recipe for you, but I can't seem to find it. I'll do some digging tomorrow, and if I find it, I'll post it for you.

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packerduf wrote:

beersnob wrote:

Thnx for posting this recipe, I am going to try it in the next few days. Paulaner Hefe Weizen is the greatest beer invented. Hopefully this recipe will come close.

Beersnob;

I wanted to post the original recipe for you, but I can't seem to find it. I'll do some digging tomorrow, and if I find it, I'll post it for you.

Found it! Keep in mind this is for a 5-gallon batch. If anyone is interested in the mini-mash method, or the all-grain method, let me know and I'll post it.

Paulaner Hefe-Weizen:

This Bavarian-style hefe-weizen has an off-white head and a light golden color. The sweet malt aroma leads into a smooth blend of sweetness and wheat flavor with a semi-dry aftertaste. This highly carbonated wheat beer is crisp and refreshing.

Yield: 5 gallons
Original Gravity: 1.053-1.054
Final Gravity: 1.011-1.012
IBU: 10
SRM: 4-5
5.4% alcohol by volume

Crush and steep in 1/2 gallon 150 degrees water for 20 minutes:
4 oz. German Munich Malt

Strain the grain water into your brew pot. Sparge the grains with 1/2 gallon water at 150 degrees. Add water to the brew pot for 1.5 gallons total volume. Bring the water to a boil, remove the pot from the stove, and add:
6 lb. wheat DME (55 percent wheat, 45 percent barley)
1 oz. German Hallertau Hersbrucker @ 3% AA (3 HBU) (bittering hop)

Add water until total volume in the brew pot is 2.5 gallons. Boil for 60 minutes, remove pot from stove, and cool for 15 minutes. Strain the cooled wort into the primary fermenter and add cold water to obtain 5 gallons. When the wort temperature is under 80 degrees, pitch your yeast.
1st choice: Wyeast's 3056 Bavarian wheat yeast
2nd choice: Wyeast's 3333 German wheat yeast

Ferment in the primary fermenter 5-7 days or until fermentation slows, then siphon into the secondary fermenter. Bottle when fermentation is complete with:
1 1/4 cup M&F wheat DME

Serve at 40 degrees in a wheat beer glass.

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Update: Bottling today after 3 weeks fermentation. Color looks spot-on despite boiling entire amount of UME. Tasting quite excellent out of the keg. Can't wait to try it carbed. I predict this will become a regular for me, therefore I am dubbing this beer "eDay Hefe-Weizen".

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A quick update, and then a few questions.

Update: This beer turned out quite good, but needed more conditioning time than I would have thought, for a hefe. It was also darker than expected out of the bottle. I really think the LME I used was old, but like I said, quite good with extra time.

Question: I am bottling my 2nd GO of this recipe today. What are your recommendations for desired CO2? According to Screwy's Bottle Priming Calculator, a German-style Weizen should fall between 3.6 and 4.5. To achieve 4.0, it would require 1 tsp. cane sugar per 12 oz. bottle. Am I setting myself up for bottle-bombs here? I've never primed with more than 3/4 tsp. per 12 oz. bottle before. I will be conditioning at 66-68 degrees. Appreciate any guidance here.

Edit: I had to get this in the bottle before the wife came home with the groceries - she would need the counter space. So absent advice, I went ahead and used 3/4 tsp. per 12 oz. bottle, just to be safe. I did however put 1 tsp. in one bottle, and marked it accordingly. So at least I'll have some idea of the different level of carbonation, and as to whether or not I created a bottle bomb. Any bets?

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Hey Packer. I used the amounts from Screwy's calculator for my German Hefe, and I was nervous about bottle bombs too. I checked a few other calculators, and the amounts were basically the same. Absolutely no problems here. Carb is great, nice head, etc.

That recipe looks great!

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GWCR wrote:

Hey Packer. I used the amounts from Screwy's calculator for my German Hefe, and I was nervous about bottle bombs too. I checked a few other calculators, and the amounts were basically the same. Absolutely no problems here. Carb is great, nice head, etc.

That recipe looks great!

Thanks man. I'll most likely go with 1 tsp. next time. That would put me at about 4.0, and I think that's where I'd like to be for the hefe's. It just seemed like a lot of sugar for a 12 oz. bottle.

It's nice to know you were a little nervous also. But I guess when you think about it, 4.0 is 4.0, and if it's within the style guidelines, then it shouldn't produce bottle-bombs unless something else is whacked. Make sense?

Anyway, thanks for the reply. Based on your success, I'll be much more confident next time.

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