Jump to content
Mr.Beer Community
Sign in to follow this  
hi1mnick

#2 BIAB Attempt...Fat Tire Clone

Recommended Posts

So when I went out west last year I had the opportunity to try Fat Tire, and I loved it. I live on the east coast so finding Fat Tire is nearly impossible. Also, I recently purchased BYO's 250 Commercial Clone's Recipe Magazine and saw Fat Tire in there, so I thought why not? I began to scale the recipe down a bit hoping things would work out, and I almost hit the exact OG and FG, along with IBU's and SRM. This is the recipe I scaled down and plan to give it a go with the BIAB method. Judging how much water to use will most likely be the hard part. I am thinking around 3.5-3.75 gallons.

Fat Tire Clone
--------------
Brewer:
Style: American Amber Ale
Batch: 2.13 galAll Grain

Characteristics
---------------
Recipe Gravity: 1.064 OG
Recipe Bitterness: 21 IBU
Recipe Color: 15° SRM
Estimated FG: 1.016
Alcohol by Volume: 6.2%
Alcohol by Weight: 4.9%

Ingredients
-----------
Biscuit (Belgian) 0.15 lb, Grain, Mashed
CaraPils 0.25 lb, Grain, Mashed
Chocolate Malt (US) 0.15 lb, Grain, Mashed
Crystal 20L 0.25 lb, Grain, Mashed
Munich (US) 0.25 lb, Grain, Mashed
Two-row (US) 4.00 lb, Grain, Mashed

Fuggles (U.K.) 0.25 oz, Pellet, 20 minutes
Fuggles (U.K.) 0.25 oz, Pellet, 0 minutes
Willamette 0.50 oz, Pellet, 90 minutes

California Ale yeast 1.00 unit, Yeast,
Irish Moss 1.00 unit, Fining,

Notes
-----
Recipe Notes:
Brew In A Bag
Single Infusion Mash at 154 Degrees for 45-60 minutes


Since it is BIAB I might mash longer than 60 minutes, but that was what the recipe called for. Also, I couldn't find Pale Malt in the Qbrew directory so I used Two-Row...Not entirely sure if they are the same grain since I am still learning.

I will be tasting my first BIAB experiment on Christmas Eve, but it never hurts to start planning for your next!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks great. I am also a big fan of Fat Tire. I made this in the extract version. Just bottled this weekend. Can't wait to try it. Let me know how this AG comes out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stinkyjunk wrote:

Looks great. I am also a big fan of Fat Tire. I made this in the extract version. Just bottled this weekend. Can't wait to try it. Let me know how this AG comes out.

Will do my friend. What did your extract version look like?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Didn't record the recipe...but it was a "Fat Boy Amber Ale" kit. Ill get it next time I go to my LHBS. It was my first 5 gallon/ non Mr Beer kit beer. I love Fat Tire, so when I saw it, I knew that had to be my first....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Two things:

1) I would plan on mashing for 70 minutes when doing the BIAB- it helps

2) Look up esheppy's Fat Tire clone recipes - he's done many versions and can provide some great input in both extract or AG versions for ya

Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kealia wrote:

Two things:

1) I would plan on mashing for 70 minutes when doing the BIAB- it helps

2) Look up esheppy's Fat Tire clone recipes - he's done many versions and can provide some great input in both extract or AG versions for ya

Good luck!

70 minutes sounds like a plan, that's what I did for my first BIAB.

I will have to look around for his recipe...thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BugLaden wrote:

Are you referring to THIS?

Yessir, that is the copy of BYO Magazine that I bought that has the Fat Tire clone in it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just an FYI on the grains of today. After talking to my LHBS guy he told me with how well modified the grains are now, mashing past 30 minutes is almost a waste of time as the grains usually convert in the 20-30 minute time frame. I haven't tested his theory out yet but I definately will when the weather is warmer outside. (I brew outdoors). Hoping for a warm spell of say 40 degrees so I can get outdoors and brew my Stout recipe soon!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

D Rabbit wrote:

Just an FYI on the grains of today. After talking to my LHBS guy he told me with how well modified the grains are now, mashing past 30 minutes is almost a waste of time as the grains usually convert in the 20-30 minute time frame. I haven't tested his theory out yet but I definately will when the weather is warmer outside. (I brew outdoors). Hoping for a warm spell of say 40 degrees so I can get outdoors and brew my Stout recipe soon!

Bump.

Hey Wabbit - you get a chance to test this out yet? I'd love to know if that's the case as it would shave 40 minutes off an already easy process!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting indeed. I don't get any off flavors that I can detect by going longer, but I'm sure interested in checking gravity at 20 minutes next time I do an AG batch.

I think for that I may stick with the 1.25 qts/lb ratio, then pull a sample at 20 minutes, chill to 65 and check the gravity.

If I can knock 40 minutes off the brew time that would be keen.

Yes, I said keen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kealia wrote:

Interesting indeed. I don't get any off flavors that I can detect by going longer, but I'm sure interested in checking gravity at 20 minutes next time I do an AG batch.

I think for that I may stick with the 1.25 qts/lb ratio, then pull a sample at 20 minutes, chill to 65 and check the gravity.

If I can knock 40 minutes off the brew time that would be keen.

Yes, I said keen.

I think you meant to say neato, but keen is close enough.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The current issue of BYO has like 5 of New Belgium clone recipes in extract and all-grain version. It includes: Fat Tire, Abbey Ale, Trippel, Ranger IPA, and 1554. Pretty good edition.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hi1mnick wrote:

So when I went out west last year I had the opportunity to try Fat Tire, and I loved it. I live on the east coast so finding Fat Tire is nearly impossible. Also, I recently purchased BYO's 250 Commercial Clone's Recipe Magazine and saw Fat Tire in there, so I thought why not? I began to scale the recipe down a bit hoping things would work out, and I almost hit the exact OG and FG, along with IBU's and SRM. This is the recipe I scaled down and plan to give it a go with the BIAB method. Judging how much water to use will most likely be the hard part. I am thinking around 3.5-3.75 gallons.

Fat Tire Clone
--------------
Brewer:
Style: American Amber Ale
Batch: 2.13 galAll Grain

Characteristics
---------------
Recipe Gravity: 1.064 OG
Recipe Bitterness: 21 IBU
Recipe Color: 15° SRM
Estimated FG: 1.016
Alcohol by Volume: 6.2%
Alcohol by Weight: 4.9%

Ingredients
-----------
Biscuit (Belgian) 0.15 lb, Grain, Mashed
CaraPils 0.25 lb, Grain, Mashed
Chocolate Malt (US) 0.15 lb, Grain, Mashed
Crystal 20L 0.25 lb, Grain, Mashed
Munich (US) 0.25 lb, Grain, Mashed
Two-row (US) 4.00 lb, Grain, Mashed

Fuggles (U.K.) 0.25 oz, Pellet, 20 minutes
Fuggles (U.K.) 0.25 oz, Pellet, 0 minutes
Willamette 0.50 oz, Pellet, 90 minutes

California Ale yeast 1.00 unit, Yeast,
Irish Moss 1.00 unit, Fining,

Notes
-----
Recipe Notes:
Brew In A Bag
Single Infusion Mash at 154 Degrees for 45-60 minutes


Since it is BIAB I might mash longer than 60 minutes, but that was what the recipe called for. Also, I couldn't find Pale Malt in the Qbrew directory so I used Two-Row...Not entirely sure if they are the same grain since I am still learning.

I will be tasting my first BIAB experiment on Christmas Eve, but it never hurts to start planning for your next!

yah, mash more than 60 mins, as much as 90, maybe 70.
Very smart to use only a little chocolate malt.
Looks good. Very good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hi1mnick wrote:

Stinkyjunk wrote:

Looks great. I am also a big fan of Fat Tire. I made this in the extract version. Just bottled this weekend. Can't wait to try it. Let me know how this AG comes out.

Will do my friend. What did your extract version look like?

Got the recipe, and another kit today. I tasted this and it is my favorite home brew by far to date. It is great. Not sure if it actually tastes like Fat Tire...but I really think it is so much better IMHO.

Fat Boy Amber Ale

5.5 # light LME
1.5 # amber LME
6 oz munich malt (steep)
.25 # Victory malt (steep)
3 oz biscuit malt (steep)

.5 oz Columbus (:60)
.25 oz Cascade (:15)
.25 oz Cascade (:01)
WLP008 East Coast Ale Yeast

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, I brewed this up on Monday and everything went according to plan, except for a few things...I started with 3.75 gallons of water for 5.10 lbs of grain. I mashed for 70 minutes at 154. I heated the water to about 161 and after adding the grain hit my target of 154...so it started well. I wrapped 2 towels around the pot to help keep the heat in, after 70 minutes it was 150 degrees.

I pulled out the bag and squeezed my heart out (no mash out or anything). After all was said and done with the mash, I began my 90 minute boil, adding my hops and irish moss. After the boil, I put in an ice bath and decided to transfer to the keg at about 85 degrees. I took a hydrometer reading and I hit 1.050 which was not my target. My target was 1.064. My first brew in a bag hit the exact same gravity, 1.050. I'm disappointed, but hey I still made beer. I ended up with literally the exact amount for the keg, including the gunk and all those nasties so this one will surely be cold crashed.

This is where the fun began. This was the 2nd time I used liquid yeast, however my first using yeast in a vile (California Ale Yeast). The instructions said to shake well, then add to wort. So I began to shake. After shaking, I cracked the top and the yeast exploded! Doing my best to make sure it exploded into the keg, it dripped all over my hands and outside of the vile casing. I decided to let it sit and then whisk the hell out of it, knowing the damage has been done and if it was going to be contaminated then so be it, but I am still going to let it sit.

As of right now, the thing is blowing up and active fermentation is definitely taking place, so in about 2 weeks I will give it a taste and see if it's beer.

Overall it was a success, and I am sure I made beer. I still need to work on my efficiency and hitting my gravity, and I learned a thing or two about yeast in the viles. But with this hobby I have learned to just relax and have a homebrew. I continue to enjoy the brewing experience and I will continue to work at perfecting this method along with my beer. Thanks again everyone! I will post pictures at a later date and let you know how it turns out.

Cheers! And Brew on!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It almost sounds that while BIAB is definitely more convienient, it is dramatically less efficient than the traditional method. Perhaps the lack of sparging is the cuplprit? The only way at this point I would ever go all grain, is BIAB. So I read any session reports like this with interest.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BugLaden wrote:

It almost sounds that while BIAB is definitely more convienient, it is dramatically less efficient than the traditional method. Perhaps the lack of sparging is the cuplprit? The only way at this point I would ever go all grain, is BIAB. So I read any session reports like this with interest.

I will definitely give sparging a try next time I do an AG batch. Just have to keep working at it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BugLaden wrote:

I'd be interested in the how-to when sparging BIAB.

I thought part of the point with BIAB was to use more water for the mash and skip sparging completely.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BugLaden wrote:

It almost sounds that while BIAB is definitely more convienient, it is dramatically less efficient than the traditional method. Perhaps the lack of sparging is the cuplprit? The only way at this point I would ever go all grain, is BIAB. So I read any session reports like this with interest.


Not sure I would totally agree with that. With the batch I did about two weeks ago I hit 81% efficiency. I think part of what helps is milling the grain twice at the finest setting.


bpgreen wrote:

BugLaden wrote:

I'd be interested in the how-to when sparging BIAB.

I thought part of the point with BIAB was to use more water for the mash and skip sparging completely.

You certainly can. What Tobias and I have found that works is using a vegetable basket inside a larger pot like the one below to set the bag on once you take it out of the water and drain/squeeze it. Setting it on this allows it to drain some more into the pot. You can also press down on the bag a bit and use it like a false bottom.

You can easily sparge at that point by simply opening the bad and pouring about 1/4 - 1/2 gallon of water through the bag to make sure it goes through the grain and not just over it.

I think it makes a bit of a difference and if missed my target gravity by as much as what was mentioned above I'd look to the double milling and a small sparge. Only adds about 5 minutes to the process.

Hope this helps.
steamerbasket.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good deal. I think the only things I do differently are:

- Stirring the mash every 15 minutes
- Adding heat if needed to keep it as close to 154-155 as possible (I really don't know if those other 4 degrees make a difference or not from 150).
- Doing the little sparge that I mentioned above

All in all, sounds like you are still happy with the result.

Obviously a more predictable OG would be ideal but I think it's easily accomplished.

Believe me, I'm no genius! :P

Oh yeah, sorry to hear about the yeast explosion!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kealia wrote:

Good deal. I think the only things I do differently are:

- Stirring the mash every 15 minutes
- Adding heat if needed to keep it as close to 154-155 as possible (I really don't know if those other 4 degrees make a difference or not from 150).
- Doing the little sparge that I mentioned above

All in all, sounds like you are still happy with the result.

Obviously a more predictable OG would be ideal but I think it's easily accomplished.

Believe me, I'm no genius! :P

Oh yeah, sorry to hear about the yeast explosion!

I am definitely determined to make this work. Overall, I am happy because ultimately I will make beer. As for the yeast lol...I have fermentation but it looks awfully white. Last time I had a batch that looked like this it was infected. I can only hope it works out. Time will tell.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't know what could explain efficiency. I used to to BIAB PMs with 1.5 qts per lb and a dunk sparge and never beat 65%. I did 2.5 lbs grain with 3 gal water( actually closer to 3 1/2 gal, had to add to cool temp) @ 154* 70 minutes, fine grind, and got 78%. If you read the Aussie forum about BIAB, those guys are regularly hitting the 80s, it can be done.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hurst/Olds wrote:

Don't know what could explain efficiency. I used to to BIAB PMs with 1.5 qts per lb and a dunk sparge and never beat 65%. I did 2.5 lbs grain with 3 gal water( actually closer to 3 1/2 gal, had to add to cool temp) @ 154* 70 minutes, fine grind, and got 78%. If you read the Aussie forum about BIAB, those guys are regularly hitting the 80s, it can be done.

I agree So far in the 10 or so BIAB's I have done I think 2 didnt hit at least 70%. One was a batch I did not double mill and the other had some issues when the power went out and my electric stove so things got a littel funky trying to boil on my BBQ grill.

Make sure to squeeze the bag really well, and no you wont squeeze bad tannins out. Do a quick search around the internets and you will see why squeezing wont release the big bad tannins.

Doing a batch today will post results later.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...