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crazybrody

My BIAB method in pictures

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I decided to take pics of my BIAB procedure. It's pretty simple and I have only done 3. If you see something I should change let me know.
Here is a link to the actual album the photos came from.
2011-02-20%2013.23.30.jpg
The recipe
2011-02-20%2013.50.49.jpg
Bring the full volume of water (or close to it) to your strike temp. Mine was about 162.
2011-02-20%2013.49.53.jpg
I use binder clips to keep the bag in place while I add the grain.
2011-02-20%2013.52.51.jpg
Add the grain and stir.
2011-02-20%2013.54.37.jpg
Wrap the pot in towels to help maintain the temp for the 90 minute mash.
2011-02-20%2013.55.04.jpg
The temp after you add the grain will fall to hopefully around what you wanted. I was shooting for 152ish. Mine was a little warm but I wasnt worried about it.
2011-02-20%2015.27.48.jpg
After the mash time, I pull the bag out and let it drain into another pot while I bring the brew pot up to a boil. Then I sparged with about 2qts of water and squeezed the bag to get all the wort out I could.
2011-02-20%2015.45.32.jpg
Boil as usual
2011-02-21%2009.47.34.jpg
Ferementing nicely 12 hrs later at 59 degrees.

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Almost step-for-step what I do. Thanks for this. That's some good reinforcement for my process, me thinks...

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myndflyte wrote:

So what kind of water volume do you end up at when you start your boil?


I put about 3.5 gallons in the 4 gallon pot for the mash. I do this amount because it will overflow after I add the grains if I add more water. I end up with about 3 gallons or so after I pull the grain. I sparged this time with the 2 qts of water plus what I squeeze out of the bag. I ended up with about 3.75 gallons after it was all said and done. I usually only sparge with a qt or so but I wanted to bring the pre-boil volume up on this because I was doing a 90 minute boil. I was short on volume after the boil and only had about 2.1 gallons of wort and wanted 2.5 but the gravity was little higher than I anticipated.

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brody,

Semi-related question. I think I have the same brew thermometer as you. Do you know if it's possible to calibrate it, and if so, how? I just discovered last night that mine reads about 10F than it's supposed to. I can't seea calibration screw or anything, just a nut that connects the dial to the stick, and that doesn't want to turn.

If it's not possible to fix, that's a bummer, but not a huge deal, I'll just have to remember to do everything "10F hotter" than I want. :laugh:

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I dont see any way to calibrate it but I did not check mine against another thermometer yet. Thats probably a good idea! :laugh:

I will also contact my LHBS to see if there is a way to calibrate it.

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Close to what I do, except...

The nylon paint strainer ... has elastic collar ... when it wears out, after 20 mashes or so, I replace it with another for about a buck and a half. The hell with the clips.

I don't sparge. I should. I'm getting about 65-70% efficiency. I have a squeeze method that works good, but your sparge is better. I'll try and take pics of the squeeze, cuz it really is pretty easy.

I don't call it BIAB, I call it MIAB .. heh heh ... Mash in bag... the brew is the same as with extracts, only more water volume.

Excellent! I think you're onto the best kept secret in brewing! Bags! IT WORKS!

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Most excellent. I'm going to bookmark this and refer to it, because this is going to be my next step, and I'm really eager to get going on it.

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As they say..."a picture is worth a thousand words".

This is almost identical to my method as well, save a few minor differences:

1) Temps are within a degree or two
2) I use a 5-gallon pot so I have more room for the boil
3) I stir every 15 minutes (uncovering the pot, towels, etc.)

I'm sure this will be a very helpful post for people wanting to try this out.

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I would love to get a bigger pot but that would only lead to me wanting to do bigger batches. :laugh:

What's the reason to stir so often?

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crazybrody wrote:


What's the reason to stir so often?

I do it in hopes of: better circulation of the water = better extraction.

Whether it's true or not, I don't know. But I've done it that way from the start and had good results so I've stuck with it.

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Makes sense to me. I would worry about my temp dropping with all that opening of the lid. I'm getting about 75-80% efficiency stirring only every 30 minutes or so.

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VTGroff wrote:

brody,

Semi-related question. I think I have the same brew thermometer as you. Do you know if it's possible to calibrate it, and if so, how?

Put an open-end wrench (or pliers) on the nut. Then grasp the outer edge of the dial and rotate it with your fingers until proper reading is achieved.

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packerduf wrote:

VTGroff wrote:

brody,

Semi-related question. I think I have the same brew thermometer as you. Do you know if it's possible to calibrate it, and if so, how?

Put an open-end wrench (or pliers) on the nut. Then grasp the outer edge of the dial and rotate it with your fingers until proper reading is achieved.

+1
I have three of 'em, so if one is off, I just adjust to the same as the other two. Or, you can adjust it so it reads about 212 in boiling water, careful not to burn yourself.

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Kealia wrote:

As they say..."a picture is worth a thousand words".

This is almost identical to my method as well, save a few minor differences:

1) Temps are within a degree or two
2) I use a 5-gallon pot so I have more room for the boil
3) I stir every 5 minutes (uncovering the pot, towels, etc.)

I'm sure this will be a very helpful post for people wanting to try this out.

I've seen directions that say to stir every 15min, and I've seen some that don't mention stirring? Does everyone here stir? I'd think also that you'd loose too much heat. I'm going to try this brewing method soon as I get a bigger pot.

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packerduf wrote:

VTGroff wrote:

brody,

Semi-related question. I think I have the same brew thermometer as you. Do you know if it's possible to calibrate it, and if so, how?

Put an open-end wrench (or pliers) on the nut. Then grasp the outer edge of the dial and rotate it with your fingers until proper reading is achieved.


cool thanks for letting us know! Mine seems to be good. Its about 5 degrees cooler then my old one but it seems to be more accurate.

I dont think stirring makes a big difference. I stirred my first two batches about every half hour. The last one I stirred once about half hour into the mash and that was it. I got about the same efficiency all three. Now I don't know about stirring every five minutes like kealia as I have never tried that. But I'm happy with what I'm getting and the less work the better for me.

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I also read that if your mash is down around 150-152 deg, you will get a more attentuating wort for a dryer, higher abv beer that if you mash from 155-158 deg. I found this to be true. I think you can even mash down around 148, but I always shoot for 152 like you do.

But, you are correct, if you're up around 155 or over, you are ok. But don't go past 158.

I also find (and fortunately I was advised this by a LHBS guy before my first mash in bag) that it is important to have the bag big and loose enough to be able to stir the grain after you put it in to loosen and disperse it. Then check temp again, cover.

I have had no problems holding the temp with the heat off, pot covered, and not towels ... if I settle at say 152 it usually holds for an hour, maybe just a little tweek at the end. If you ever have to add heat use a real low setting and be careful. Stir when you do. You don't want the bottom of that pot to jump up in temp.

We really all are doing it about the same, it is a lot of fun, ain't it????

For me, the mash in a bag process is very much fun and rewarding. It does not make me want to stop doing extract brews, but I will never stop doing mashes, either.

What size pot is that 20qts? I'm using a 16qt pot. 20qt would be better for the double batch. 16qt is fine for one MrB size AG.

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It is very fun and I find it more rewarding than extract. It takes a bit longer but is probably less work since you just wait most of the time. I use a 16 qt pot as well. Its a little tight but it works.
They say the lower the temp the more fermentable the wort. My first two I did at 155 and they both went to 1.010 which is lower than I normally get with an extract brew.
I think I will stick to this for now I'm loving the low cost. I'm doing a 2.5 gallon batch for about 12 dollars including the yeast.

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True dat. My 'Two Dogs' cost $6.48 (pre tax, all inclusive) for a 2.4 gallon batch (of course, corn, carafa, and hops had leftovers, so cost at the LHBS was a bit higher, but those were used in the following batch). Of course, I need to do it again, as it was my first BIAB and I didn't have a good grasp of temp management at the time. My temps creeped up to 160-162 before I realized it, and thus I ended up short of FG by quite a bit. The next two didn't have that problem, so I'm itching to go at this recipe again...


TwoDogs_ingredients.jpg

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Guest System Admin

Tabasco wrote:

packerduf wrote:

VTGroff wrote:

brody,

Semi-related question. I think I have the same brew thermometer as you. Do you know if it's possible to calibrate it, and if so, how?

Put an open-end wrench (or pliers) on the nut. Then grasp the outer edge of the dial and rotate it with your fingers until proper reading is achieved.

+1
I have three of 'em, so if one is off, I just adjust to the same as the other two. Or, you can adjust it so it reads about 212 in boiling water, careful not to burn yourself.

Most accurate way (and a way to avoid steaming your hands, lol) is make an ice slurry with water and ice and stir it for a minute until the ice begins to change state. When they both reach equilibrium the slurry is at 32 degrees, then you set to freezing with the nut. You want to set it using a lower temp that is closer to the thermo resting temp, kinda like zeroing a scale. You can do it by boiling also but this provides less... burning.

hijack...

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crazybrody wrote:

Now I don't know about stirring every five minutes like kealia as I have never tried that. But I'm happy with what I'm getting and the less work the better for me.

WHOOPS! Edited my post to say every 15 minutes, not 5.

Sorry!

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Kealia wrote:

crazybrody wrote:

Now I don't know about stirring every five minutes like kealia as I have never tried that. But I'm happy with what I'm getting and the less work the better for me.

WHOOPS! Edited my post to say every 15 minutes, not 5.

Sorry!


LOL! I was thinking Man that would be a lot of work to unwrap and rewrap the towels to stir every five minutes. By the time you got the towels wrapped back around the kettle it would be time to stir again.

:laugh:

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crazybrody wrote:

Kealia wrote:

crazybrody wrote:

Now I don't know about stirring every five minutes like kealia as I have never tried that. But I'm happy with what I'm getting and the less work the better for me.

WHOOPS! Edited my post to say every 15 minutes, not 5.

Sorry!


LOL! I was thinking Man that would be a lot of work to unwrap and rewrap the towels to stir every five minutes. By the time you got the towels wrapped back around the kettle it would be time to stir again.

:laugh:

And by the time your mash was done, the temperature would be around 125. :laugh:

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Yeah, sorry if I confused anybody there. I have to remember to slow down and double check things like that when I type.

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Nah... you don't want to do that... If people started self-editing around here, we'd lose a lot of comedy... ;)

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Hey experts, I'm brewing a stout in the next few days and wanted to double check something.

Why is the full boil volume used in the mash? Isn't the conversion more efficient at a certain ratio?

This is my first BIAB/all grain beer, let me know what you think.

Edit: 2.4 gal batch

4 lbs Maris Otter
.25 lbs roasted barley
.25 lbs chocolate malt
.5 lbs flaked oats

all mashed @ 153ish

.75 oz kent goldings AA 4.5% @ 60 minutes

1/3 packet of safale s04 and 1 mr beer yeast combo ;)

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FedoraDave wrote:

crazybrody wrote:

Kealia wrote:

crazybrody wrote:

Now I don't know about stirring every five minutes like kealia as I have never tried that. But I'm happy with what I'm getting and the less work the better for me.

WHOOPS! Edited my post to say every 15 minutes, not 5.

Sorry!


LOL! I was thinking Man that would be a lot of work to unwrap and rewrap the towels to stir every five minutes. By the time you got the towels wrapped back around the kettle it would be time to stir again.

:laugh:

And by the time your mash was done, the temperature would be around 125. :laugh:
I don't use towels, just the lid on the pot. It holds temp usually for at least an hour with heat off, occasionally add heat just a tad at the end. Mash 75-90 mins sometimes.
I stir right after I add the grain sack, and then once or twice during the mash, especially if I had a skoch of heat, but no more than than. I agree, don't make it more work than it needs to be.
If the towels are needed use them, but I never have needed them. Otherwise, I've done it pretty much the same, probably about a dozen mashes so far ... I started with the paper clips, but I don't even need those anymore. my pic thread

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tesilential wrote:

Hey experts, I'm brewing a stout in the next few days and wanted to double check something.

Why is the full boil volume used in the mash? Isn't the conversion more efficient at a certain ratio?

This is my first BIAB/all grain beer, let me know what you think.

Edit: 2.4 gal batch

4 lbs Maris Otter
.25 lbs roasted barley
.25 lbs chocolate malt
.5 lbs flaked oats

all mashed @ 153ish

.75 oz kent goldings AA 4.5% @ 60 minutes

1/3 packet of safale s04 and 1 mr beer yeast combo ;)

That looks good to me but be careful with the roasted barley some people love it and others dont. I dont seem to have any issue with it. I used a full lb steeped in a 5 gallon batch and it turned out good so your amount should be ok.

I think the reason that you add the full amount of water in a brew in a bag is to keep it simple. You do get better efficiency with 1.5 to 2 qts of water per lb of grain. Plus you dont (or arent supposed to) sparge with BIAB. I usually do sparge but only because I cant fit the full volume of water in my pot with the grains in it. Im getting about 70-80 percent efficiency with my method and Im happy with that.

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Couple questions:

When I steep I was told not to squeeze the bag (only rinse) to avoid tannins that are in the grain.

Why is this different in BIAB?

Do you use crushed grain in a BIAB?

Thanks, I want to try this!

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Whozyerbrewer wrote:

Couple questions:

When I steep I was told not to squeeze the bag (only rinse) to avoid tannins that are in the grain.

Why is this different in BIAB?

Do you use crushed grain in a BIAB?

Thanks, I want to try this!

From what I have read, the general rule about not squeezing the bag because of tannins isn't super accurate because tannins don't really start coming into play until you pass the 170degF mark. If you keep everything below 170, Tannins shouldn't be a problem.

It seems like a lot of BIABers on here squeeze till their heart's content with no problems.

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crazybrody wrote:

tesilential wrote:

Hey experts, I'm brewing a stout in the next few days and wanted to double check something.

Why is the full boil volume used in the mash? Isn't the conversion more efficient at a certain ratio?

This is my first BIAB/all grain beer, let me know what you think.

Edit: 2.4 gal batch

4 lbs Maris Otter
.25 lbs roasted barley
.25 lbs chocolate malt
.5 lbs flaked oats

all mashed @ 153ish

.75 oz kent goldings AA 4.5% @ 60 minutes

1/3 packet of safale s04 and 1 mr beer yeast combo ;)

That looks good to me but be careful with the roasted barley some people love it and others dont. I dont seem to have any issue with it. I used a full lb steeped in a 5 gallon batch and it turned out good so your amount should be ok.

I think the reason that you add the full amount of water in a brew in a bag is to keep it simple. You do get better efficiency with 1.5 to 2 qts of water per lb of grain. Plus you dont (or arent supposed to) sparge with BIAB. I usually do sparge but only because I cant fit the full volume of water in my pot with the grains in it. Im getting about 70-80 percent efficiency with my method and Im happy with that.

I was under the impression I HAD to use roasted barley in order to make a stout?

any suggestions are welcome, i'm going to buy the ingredients in 2 hours!

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You dont HAVE to use anything you dont want. While a stout does have a certain flavor profile like the burnt and coffee flavors you get from roasted barley. You can use any dark malt you choose.
Im not saying dont use the roasted barley, in fact I would suggest you try it, and in the amounts that you listed.
You could use the chocolate malt and some black malt to give the color and not overpower the chocolate malt with the roasted barley. This would make more of a sweet stout. But you also have to be careful with black malt as it can get astringent tasting with to much in a batch.

I always say the beauty of homebrew is you can do whatever you want. You can make a stout and hop it like an IPA. If its what you like then do it. But you cant figure out what you like without finding some thing you dont like.

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Thanks for the replies everyone!

this is my first MIAB and I'm dying to know what should my strike temp be? Ingredients: 4 pounds Maris Otter, .25 lb roasted barley (crisp), .3 lb chocolate (crisp), and .5 pound flaked oats. I will mash with 3 gal of water and total grain weight = 5 pounds.

My goal is to mash around 152, and I have a PC with an airtight lid, so I imagine my temps won't drop at all once the mash begins.

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Finally finished :silly: !

OG = 1.054

I squeezed the crap outta the grain bag and sparged with a quart of 168*f water. I think my conversion is good because the wort was sweet and delicious! Far better than the extract worts in initial taste. Pitched about half a packet of safale 04 and 1 mr beer yeast pack simultaneously. Will try to keep it under 68*, but that's difficult now, even in individual coolers with water bottles and ice. damn you hot weather!

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Hot weather? Where the hell are you? It started pissing down snow at my place in Sammamish,WA this afternoon and hasnt stopped since

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Clearcut23 wrote:

Hot weather? Where the hell are you? It started pissing down snow at my place in Sammamish,WA this afternoon and hasnt stopped since

No kidding. Even in the Metro NYC area, you've had to back up while you pee for the last two months.

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Awesome thread. Especially like the pictures. Maybe serving as inspiration for my next step in my brewing evolution...

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Ya it's hot in Tampa, FL. The kegs @ 72 today, so I'm adding ice to the cooler to try to get it down to the 60's before primary kicks in later.

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It snowed about 6 inches here overnight. Just got in from making a snowman with my 2 year old. Fun times

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tesilential wrote:

Hey experts, I'm brewing a stout in the next few days and wanted to double check something.

Why is the full boil volume used in the mash? Isn't the conversion more efficient at a certain ratio?

This is my first BIAB/all grain beer, let me know what you think.

Edit: 2.4 gal batch

4 lbs Maris Otter
.25 lbs roasted barley
.25 lbs chocolate malt
.5 lbs flaked oats

all mashed @ 153ish

.75 oz kent goldings AA 4.5% @ 60 minutes

1/3 packet of safale s04 and 1 mr beer yeast combo ;)

I've only used US Two Row, but the recipe looks ok, definately don't use more than .25lbs of chocolate malt ... also, watch the flaked oats don't give you clogged vent holes when fermenting .... Pop!

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I ended up with a lotta wort so my fermenter is almost to the neck. I have the lid just resting on the neck, not twisted on so it won't blow. Also I used a paint strainer so there aren't any grains or material in my wort at all. In fact it looks thinner than the extract worts I've made in the past and the OG is slightly lower. I expect high attenuation since I mashed for 90 minutes at 154 or less. My freezer isn't cooling the ice quickly enough to get the temps down!

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Your wort is almost touching the keg neck? If I may, I would seriously suggest you place this in a container, igloo type or a deep baking pan. This one will overflow. Batten down the hatches... LOL


. icon_omg-20110224.gif

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Got a 22qt ss pot from Walmart today, 70 bucks. Seems like a well made pot, also picked up some paint strainer bags at HD. Now all I need is a recipe, anyone have a good proven BIAB recipe for a first timer :blush:

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Kinda depends on the beer style you like. Give us an idea or two on your preference and we may be able to hook you up...

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Looky what I found on clearance at Wally today...

!B7yfbuQB2k~$(KGrHqIOKjIEzJrWft2sBM1RlYG

2 gallon stackable water cooler. They only had two left. I considered picking up both. $6 each...

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I like IPA's the most, with lots of hop flavor. I was thinking of a SN Celebration ale clone? Maybe using american two-row, crystal 50-60l, and alot of cascade hops? Not sure on the yeast type :unsure:

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US-05 is a good choice from the dry front. A simple, but tasty, IPA is a Bell's Two Hearted clone. It uses Centennial, but Centennial is referred to as "super Cascade", so I'd bet you'd get similar flavor with cascade. Just bump up the amounts to match the AA...

Here's my BIAB recipe for Two-Hearted based on other people's clones of this fine brew (will be executed on shortly)...
Amount Item Type % or IBU
4.50 lb Malteurop 2-Row (2.0 SRM) Grain 78.26 %
0.75 lb Vienna Malt (3.5 SRM) Grain 13.04 %
0.25 lb Cara-Pils/Dextrine (2.0 SRM) Grain 4.35 %
0.25 lb Caramel/Crystal Malt - 10L (10.0 SRM) Grain 4.35 %
0.41 oz Centennial [8.80 %] (60 min) Hops 26.3 IBU
0.20 oz Centennial [8.80 %] (45 min) Hops 12.1 IBU
0.20 oz Centennial [8.80 %] (30 min) Hops 10.1 IBU
0.20 oz Centennial [8.80 %] (15 min) Hops 6.5 IBU
0.16 oz Centennial [8.80 %] (0 min) Hops -
0.16 oz Centennial [8.80 %] (Dry Hop 3 days) Hops -
1 Pkgs American Ale Yeast Yeast-Ale (US-05)

Est Original Gravity: 1.064 SG
Est Final Gravity: 1.018 SG
Estimated Alcohol by Vol: 5.97 %
Bitterness: 54.9 IBU
Est Color: 5.2 SRM

Note that cascade has a lower alpha, so if it were me doing it, I'd bump it up to match the IBU. Of course, you could just take what you've listed and pretty much wing something together in QBrew or Beersmith...

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swenocha wrote:

Looky what I found on clearance at Wally today...

!B7yfbuQB2k~$(KGrHqIOKjIEzJrWft2sBM1RlYG

2 gallon stackable water cooler. They only had two left. I considered picking up both. $6 each...

That's the one I have. It works great. I don't like the spout very much, but last time I just poured it directly out of the cooler instead of trying to use the spout. The spout looks like it would come out easily, though, so I may get around to replacing it some day.

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It screws right out. I already explored that and am wondering what I could find to replace it...

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Hey guys loving this thread had a few questions:

For BIAB method, is this mainly used for full mash batches or can it be used for partial?

What kind of bag do you use / where do you get them?

When I do partials i leave my heat on very low and it usually maintains the temp / sometimes i have to play with the heat, is it better to just cover it with the towels and let it sit?

thanks guys

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Full mash or partial? Sure... either one

Kind of bag? I use Lowe's paint strainers (http://tinyurl.com/paintstrain). You can also get bags at the LHBS

Keep on heat or wrap? Personal preference. I've found, for me, it's easier to maintain a consistent temp with the wrap off of the heat. I think it really depends on if you can maintain that consistent temp on your stove/burner.

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swenocha wrote:

Full mash or partial? Sure... either one

Kind of bag? I use Lowe's paint strainers (http://tinyurl.com/paintstrain). You can also get bags at the LHBS

Keep on heat or wrap? Personal preference. I've found, for me, it's easier to maintain a consistent temp with the wrap off of the heat. I think it really depends on if you can maintain that consistent temp on your stove/burner.

+1

I use the paint strainers and the cooler swen posted earlier and they work just fine. I'm so lazy, I use my coffeepot to heat the water because it brings it right to 170.

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bpgreen wrote:

swenocha wrote:

Full mash or partial? Sure... either one

Kind of bag? I use Lowe's paint strainers (http://tinyurl.com/paintstrain). You can also get bags at the LHBS

Keep on heat or wrap? Personal preference. I've found, for me, it's easier to maintain a consistent temp with the wrap off of the heat. I think it really depends on if you can maintain that consistent temp on your stove/burner.

+1

I use the paint strainers and the cooler swen posted earlier and they work just fine. I'm so lazy, I use my coffeepot to heat the water because it brings it right to 170.


Lazy is such a harsh word, bpgreen. Efficient sounds much better.

I have a question about the cooler you and swen were talking about. Do you just dump your heated water in that cooler and mash in the cooler? Do you still have use a bag?

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slykryck wrote:

bpgreen wrote:

swenocha wrote:

Full mash or partial? Sure... either one

Kind of bag? I use Lowe's paint strainers (http://tinyurl.com/paintstrain). You can also get bags at the LHBS

Keep on heat or wrap? Personal preference. I've found, for me, it's easier to maintain a consistent temp with the wrap off of the heat. I think it really depends on if you can maintain that consistent temp on your stove/burner.

+1

I use the paint strainers and the cooler swen posted earlier and they work just fine. I'm so lazy, I use my coffeepot to heat the water because it brings it right to 170.


Lazy is such a harsh word, bpgreen. Efficient sounds much better.

I have a question about the cooler you and swen were talking about. Do you just dump your heated water in that cooler and mash in the cooler? Do you still have use a bag?

This article explains it fully...

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swenocha wrote:

slykryck wrote:

bpgreen wrote:

swenocha wrote:

Full mash or partial? Sure... either one

Kind of bag? I use Lowe's paint strainers (http://tinyurl.com/paintstrain). You can also get bags at the LHBS

Keep on heat or wrap? Personal preference. I've found, for me, it's easier to maintain a consistent temp with the wrap off of the heat. I think it really depends on if you can maintain that consistent temp on your stove/burner.

+1

I use the paint strainers and the cooler swen posted earlier and they work just fine. I'm so lazy, I use my coffeepot to heat the water because it brings it right to 170.


Lazy is such a harsh word, bpgreen. Efficient sounds much better.

I have a question about the cooler you and swen were talking about. Do you just dump your heated water in that cooler and mash in the cooler? Do you still have use a bag?

This article explains it fully...

That article is awesome swen! Thanks.

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slykryck wrote:

Lazy is such a harsh word, bpgreen. Efficient sounds much better.

Early in my programming career, somebody who was very senior told me that the secret to his success was creative laziness. He wasn't talking about trying to avoid tasks, but trying to find better ways to do them or to find ways to automate them so he didn't have to do them again.

I find myself looking for ways to be creatively lazy in many areas.

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thanks for the help guys, I did like that article


swenocha wrote:

True dat. My 'Two Dogs' cost $6.48 (pre tax, all inclusive) for a 2.4 gallon batch (of course, corn, carafa, and hops had leftovers, so cost at the LHBS was a bit higher, but those were used in the following batch). Of course, I need to do it again, as it was my first BIAB and I didn't have a good grasp of temp management at the time. My temps creeped up to 160-162 before I realized it, and thus I ended up short of FG by quite a bit. The next two didn't have that problem, so I'm itching to go at this recipe again...


TwoDogs_ingredients.jpg

is there a place where you get the ingredients so cheap?

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bpgreen wrote:

slykryck wrote:

Lazy is such a harsh word, bpgreen. Efficient sounds much better.

Early in my programming career, somebody who was very senior told me that the secret to his success was creative laziness. He wasn't talking about trying to avoid tasks, but trying to find better ways to do them or to find ways to automate them so he didn't have to do them again.

I find myself looking for ways to be creatively lazy in many areas.

That's similar to something I was told once by my sister-in-law's father. He said if you want to find the best way to do a job, assign it to the laziest guy you know. Same principle.

I do much the same in my job. Saving footsteps or drive time is definitely to my benefit.

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pswams26 wrote:

thanks for the help guys, I did like that article


swenocha wrote:

True dat. My 'Two Dogs' cost $6.48 (pre tax, all inclusive) for a 2.4 gallon batch (of course, corn, carafa, and hops had leftovers, so cost at the LHBS was a bit higher, but those were used in the following batch). Of course, I need to do it again, as it was my first BIAB and I didn't have a good grasp of temp management at the time. My temps creeped up to 160-162 before I realized it, and thus I ended up short of FG by quite a bit. The next two didn't have that problem, so I'm itching to go at this recipe again...


TwoDogs_ingredients.jpg

is there a place where you get the ingredients so cheap?

Rebel is my LHBS (though they are primarily an internet/ship outlet)...

2-row at $0.83/lb
Bonlander at $1.35/lb
Flaked Maize at $1.50/lb
Carafa II at $0.12/oz (though I can get that cheaper at my other LHBS)
Perle at $1.19/oz
Saaz at $1.89/oz
S-04 yeast at $2.45/pkg

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swenocha wrote:


This article explains it fully...

I'm doing my first PM tonight, and I'm going to use this method. I got a 2gal cooler from Target for $10. I'm using esheppy's fat tire clone recipe. I'm pretty excited but nervous at the same time :laugh:

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The only challenge with this method, in my mind, is to not let your temps get away from you. Otherwise it is no harder than steeping. In fact, I find it easier than trying to get every drop of sticky extract out of the can...

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The all grain stout I brewed on the last page cost $10 + yeast (which I had already). I'm excited because now I can make practically any recipe, for cheaper than a standard refill.

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Great article on the partial mash process. Hope to try this in the near future.

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swenocha, I've heard alot about the Bells Two hearted Ale, so I picked some up to try. I'll let you know how it was, and maybe try your recipe. Cheers!

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