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Kealia

Spring Seasonal Maibock: How are you brewing it?

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We had a thread for the Fall Seasonal (and I think there was one for the Winter but I didn't make that one), so I thought we needed one for the Spring Seasonal Maibock.

How are you brewing this one?
After much deliberation I decided against steeping some Carapils or adding anything else and just brew it straight up.

My thinking was that the leprechauns, gremlins, elves, hobbits, etc. spent a good deal of time coming up with this recipe so I decided not to mess with it.

I made mine this past weekend and will let it ferment at the desired range (likely 55-58) for 3 weeks. At that point I will likely raise the temp for 2-3 days for a diacetyl rest (may not be needed, but it can't hurt)and then lager it for a week at 40-45 before bottling.

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I'm doing one straight up, and the other will steep with 1/2 lb Carapils. The first will be primed with sugar, the next batch primed with honey. I'm brewing both of them up tomorrow.

Temps are supposed to drop to the low teens for highs and subzero at night, so I'll be putting both kegs in the back bedroom and closing the heater vent and closing the door. That'll drop the temp down to at least the low 50's in that room, so it's definately going to be in the keg the full three weeks.

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Nice. I love doing head-to-head tests like that.

I thought about ordering two, but want to make sure it's not overly hoppy in terms of what I'm hoping for.

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I made this on Sunday and then it in my cooler with a frozen gallon of water. I checked in on Monday late morning and it was at 46 - D'oh!

Took it out and moved it to another location with a swamp cooler going on and it's been at 54-56 since. Nice layer of krasuen going now.

My OG: 1.062 @ 60 degrees.

Is nobody else brewing this one? Given the response to the last seasonals I expected to see a lot of posts here.


Or do you guys not love me anymore? :unsure:

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Brewed mine up on saturday :cheer: did it straight and fermenting in my garage in a cooler! my garage is about 40 to 49 in the winter so i put it in a cooler by its self and it is brewing right along a very big head of krausen going on right and my og was the same as yours!!!Will ferment for 3 weeks and then batch prime and let it sit for at least 6 weeks before i give it a taste :laugh: maybe 4 weeks :laugh:

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I brewed both of mine yesterday. My OG only came in at .056. I thought that was a little low. The second keg that I give the honey to will be a late addition, so outside of Carapils, both batches were the same yesterday. Finished about two in the afternoon and now at eight AM, both are very, very active. :-)

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That's an interesting difference in the OG. I actually filled my keg to the top of the Q for I could get as much out of this as possible. I wasn't worried about diluting the brew as it was strong to start with.

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Kealia wrote:

My thinking was that the leprechauns, gremlins, elves, hobbits, etc. spent a good deal of time coming up with this recipe so I decided not to mess with it.

Are you saying Eric G. is a short, strange, little creature?

:chug:

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Im just going to brew mine per recipe, Ive got 4 kegs fermenting so i dont have any room for another week, Ive tried the Honey Maibock before so im curious to see the difference, I bet its a lot better.

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Cheers Beer Brothers :chug:
I'm doing mine tonight straight up. Thought about adding a cup of belgian blond sugar, but now I say no.
I'm going for the record for the fastest Mr Beer Brew ever made. :laugh:
My wife's been away & I've been on the loose. :gulp:
Capt Lawrence last Thurs & Friday (Tasting from various barrels with the Brew Master himself & he's asking my opinion. :lol: )Saturday I went to a Victory Brew Nite - 27 Taps! I had them all!
Monday I was at Capt Lawrence Home Brew Nite In Stamford at Coal Fired Pizza place - Racked Last Nite & Tonight I brew. :barman:

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going to do mine by the directions, Then will place in my beer fridge with it's shinny brand new analog thermostat, will set it at around 55 degrees. Just waiting for my first 5 gal batch to finish up before I start this one.

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that would be a lager. so i brewed it according to the recipe except i used Bavarian Lager Liquid Yeast. it is in my mini fridge at the start of lagering between 50 and 55 F :laugh:

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This is my first batch of Maibock. I ordered it because it was a lager, which I remember lagers being a rich golden color, not the light yellow of a pilsner or an Ale, but a richer darker golden color. So when I put it in the keg for fermentation It looked very dark. Which, made me think of the name Mai"bock". Is this truly a Bock beer with the dark brown color?

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Followed directions being only my second brew since xmas.West Coast turned out great.Maibock smelled and tasted great going in but have'nt learned the hydrometer yet for the SG.Thought I might try honey prime on half and do a bottle to bottle comparison over a six week conditioning.Yay...nay...???

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:borg: Welcome to the beerborg information center. you will be assimilated. resistance is quite futile: we have..gobz of beer.

:huh: what? not sure what your asking here.

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Bizdoc wrote:

This is my first batch of Maibock. I ordered it because it was a lager, which I remember lagers being a rich golden color, not the light yellow of a pilsner or an Ale, but a richer darker golden color. So when I put it in the keg for fermentation It looked very dark. Which, made me think of the name Mai"bock". Is this truly a Bock beer with the dark brown color?

Lagers can be just about any color (as can ales, really). Pilsners are lagers and they are very light in color. But some lagers are pretty dark. The Maibock has an SRM of 10, which puts it in the middle of Amber according to the Mr Beer flavor profile.

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I've been gone for the past 5 days so I checked my keg this morning and was happy to see it holding at 54 - 56 with a nice krasuen going. Looks like mine is progressing nicely and the yeast are on cruise control, nice.

For the question above - sure, prime half with honey and taste them head-to-head. It's the only way to really compare things IMO.

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Started mine on Sunday afternoon and it is coming along nicely. have the fridge set at 52-53 and the yeasties are working overtime.

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Brewed mine today, standard instructions and no additives. OG was at 1.064. Smells great.

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Brewing mine straight up as the directions said (there's a first time for everything). I have mine in a cooler I bought at Walmart for $18 and I have been swapping out 1 liter bottle(Mr.B bottle) of ice and 1 sandwich size baggy of ice every 24 hours. It has been staying at 53-57 degrees.I'll be leaving it in the fermenter for roundabouts 3 weeks. We'll see. OG was 1.056. Anyone know what the projected FG is?

I'm pretty excited for this one, my first lager and my temp control experiment has worked out perfectly. The krausen head on this thing is crazy.

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MattyJ wrote:

The krausen head on this thing is crazy.

Same with mine - looks like the top of a cream pie.
A delicious beer cream pie.

New to using hydrometer, but I think my OG was 1.064.

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Yeah, I've got a nice thick, foamy krausen as well. I keep perving this one to make sure my temps hold steady since I'm doing the swamp cooler in the "basement". So far, so good.

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Hoping to check gravity tonight and bring the temp up a few degrees for a diacetyl rest before lagering for a week, then bottling.

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Just checked gravity and I'm at 1.020 after 2 1/2 weeks.

That's about 67% attenuation. I read that the S-23 is a medium attenuating strain so I think that's gonna be about where I net out, but I'm curious as to where everybody else ended up.

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Danielsan wrote:

What exactly is diecetyl rest?

It's just raising the temp for a few days to get the yeast to clean up some of the byproducts (diacetyl being the big one here) that are created during primary fermentation.

Some lager strains produce more than others, and even some ale yeasts can produce it if fermented too warm. These come through as buttery aromas and tastes.

Warming up the beer for a few days as fermentation draws near an end (75% of FG is a good rule of thumb) helps to clean things up and make sure that doesn't get into the final brew.

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I checked gravity last night and I beleive it is 1.018. This was my first time with the hydrometer but I think I read it correctly. I am at day 16 so I was thinking of letting it go to 21. What do you think? Also, how many degree are you raising the temp to before lagering? I fremented between 54° and 58°. Should I go to 61°-62°?

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I just added this one to the brew club. Probably gonna add some grains, but not sure what kind. I also got the dark strong ale.

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Edd1619 wrote:

I checked gravity last night and I beleive it is 1.018. This was my first time with the hydrometer but I think I read it correctly. I am at day 16 so I was thinking of letting it go to 21. What do you think? Also, how many degree are you raising the temp to before lagering? I fremented between 54° and 58°. Should I go to 61°-62°?

Normally it's about 5 degrees, so you could go to 63 or so.

I can control the lagering temps and temps around 66-68 but I don't think I can nail the in between so I'll just let it come up to 66 for a couple of days. But I'm going to give it three full weeks to ferment at normal temps first, I think.

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I'm happy to find this thread, Just got my maibock today, Wow Big Can This is my first seasonal & first non fromunda yeast, can't start for a few days yet as my fermenters are still in use. Going to try hard to keep the right temps.

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Kealia wrote:

Edd1619 wrote:

I checked gravity last night and I beleive it is 1.018. This was my first time with the hydrometer but I think I read it correctly. I am at day 16 so I was thinking of letting it go to 21. What do you think? Also, how many degree are you raising the temp to before lagering? I fremented between 54° and 58°. Should I go to 61°-62°?

Normally it's about 5 degrees, so you could go to 63 or so.

I can control the lagering temps and temps around 66-68 but I don't think I can nail the in between so I'll just let it come up to 66 for a couple of days. But I'm going to give it three full weeks to ferment at normal temps first, I think.

Thanks Kealia. I am thinking I will take gravity again on Friday and if it didn't change then I will bring the temp up then. If it is lower then I will go the full 21 before bringing the temp up. I am figuring the lager period should clear it up a bit. My keg is pretty cloudy right now.

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Edd1619 wrote:


Thanks Kealia. I am thinking I will take gravity again on Friday and if it didn't change then I will bring the temp up then. If it is lower then I will go the full 21 before bringing the temp up. I am figuring the lager period should clear it up a bit. My keg is pretty cloudy right now.

I have to say that I was surprised at how cloudy my hydrometer sample was, too.

I'm checking gravity again tomorrow and will likely then raise my temp for 2-3 days and then a week of cold (fridge temp) lagering.

By then, I expect a pretty clean brew.

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I checked gravity today and it is still 1.018 but before I go the next step I have two questions, if I raise the temp to high will it negatively affect the batch? I can’t really maintain the 63° I wanted to get to. I can get around 66° but I am not sure if that is too high. Also, does the temp have to be raised? Can I just go right to the lagering phase? The sample doesn’t really taste or smell buttery to me. Does that type of off-flavor appear after the carb or conditioning period?

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I think you can go higher if needed. I can;t hold 63 either so mine is coming up to 66.

If you don't smell or taste anything, go ahead and lager it. I'm just doing it out of repetition for my lagers (to build memory for the process). Mine doesn't smell either.

I believe this yeast strain has a low propensity for producing diacetyl in the first place.

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I actually checked everywhere in my house and found a spot that is 62.5 right now so it should stay between that temp and about 65 so I will leave there for a couple days before lagering. Thanks for your help again Kealia. I'll get it sooner or later.....

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My Maibock has been brewing for 2 weeks at about 59 degrees, and unlike previous brews (ales) that were clear in a weeks time, the Maibock is still cloudy and bubbling on top. I intend to let it ferment for another week, I let all brews ferment for 3 weeks, will the Maibock clear up or has your experience shown Maibock to be clear by now?

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Bizdoc wrote:

My Maibock has been brewing for 2 weeks at about 59 degrees, and unlike previous brews (ales) that were clear in a weeks time, the Maibock is still cloudy and bubbling on top. I intend to let it ferment for another week, I let all brews ferment for 3 weeks, will the Maibock clear up or has your experience shown Maibock to be clear by now?

I haven't done this beer, but I don't get too concerned about cloudiness in the fermenter. Beers tend to clear up some in the bottle and more in the fridge.

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The Igloo cooler idea works great, I've been able to maintain my temp at a steady 51 degrees for 17 days, still a little krausen on top and it smells good and strong can't wait :)

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I went back and re-read the Maibock information. I missed the brewing suggestion. It states to let it ferment for 4 to 6 weeks, not the general rule of 2 to 3. So that would explain why I still have bubbles on top and cloudy brew. I'm going to wait the 6 weeks on this one. But it throws a wrench in my brewing schedule now.

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it says to "lager for 4-6 weeks" not Ferment in the keg.
Keep it in the keg for about 21 days. That should solve one problem.
Bottle, and set aside for 6 weeks. That will solve the other problem.

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Your right, I misread it. After looking at the entire instructions it does state ferment 14 days minimum, I have to go to 21 days since it's still fermenting and so very cloudy, then I'll bottle as usual. Thank you for clearing that up.

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Bottled 5 days ago. Tried a Blueberry Maibock using 7 Celestial Blueberry tea bags. I steeped them and I am hoping the blueberry flavor comes through....

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:cheers: Bottling this one up right now tasted great in the hydrometer sampler :chug: :laugh:

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After fermenting for three weeks at about 58, I moved it to my closet and raised the temp to 66 for 48 hours. That dropped me from the dreaded 1.020 stuck gravity to 1.016 which is right where I projected it to be.

Just took the keg and put it in my fridge and will let it lager for a week there before bottling.

Then carb and condition as normal.

FWIW, my hydrometer sample was really cloudy two days ago but re-sampling from my satellite fermenter produced a very clear sample this time around. I wouldn't sweat the cloudiness - as YD said, it will take care of itself.

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Just took a hydrometer reading tonight and moved to a secondary. OG was 1.056(a little lower than I expected). Today at 17 days in the primary it was at 1.020 and very cloudy.

I plan on leaving it in the secondary another 2 weeks at 50-55 and then bottling normally. And lagering at 40-45 for another month.

The sample I took was delicious. It definitely tasted stronger than the 5% ABV that the math says it is. It was very warming, almost too warming for SoCal, as it has ben in the 70's for the past couple weeks.

I'm going to have to brew another quick ale while I'm waiting for this one.

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it's moving your beer from the original fermenting container to another fermenting container while trying to leave all the trub behind.

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and how does this help, if the trub is left behind isn't the fermenting over and done with, and is this a common thing that is routinely done or just for more complex batches???

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mostly used in longer fermenting beers, such as Lagers. If you're doing a more complex Ale, and you need to allow it to ferment longer, some will take it off the yeast cake after 3 weeks, and let it sit a tad longer, allowing more trub to fall out.

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sorry for beating a dead horse here, instructions always read not to open the fermenter due to the possibility of some contamination, seems that changing to a secondary would increase the possibility of introducing a foreign agent and thus spoilage. Is it that beneficial that taking risk of introducing a foreign bacteria is worth the secondary?

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so what am I missing here (don't really feel like going back and reading all 3 pages) what have you got that you want to put in a secondary and why?

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I don't want to use a secondary, just trying to understand why others would want to use a secondary since the instruction book states to not open the fermentation chamber for fear of introducing bacteria, yet opening and pouring into a secondary would seem to increase the chances of introducing a bacteria, and is there a real discernable difference in the brew by transferring to a secondary that would be worth the chance of introducing a foreign bacteria?

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Bizdoc wrote:

I don't want to use a secondary, just trying to understand why others would want to use a secondary since the instruction book states to not open the fermentation chamber for fear of introducing bacteria, yet opening and pouring into a secondary would seem to increase the chances of introducing a bacteria, and is there a real discernable difference in the brew by transferring to a secondary that would be worth the chance of introducing a foreign bacteria?

Ah, ok. Some of what you're missing (as it may not be written in what your reading) is we don't "pour" the wort into the secondary. That in it's self would aerate the wort...not a good thing. So normally it's drained gently into the secondary.
Also, the secondary is sanitized, along with the transfer equipment.
The transfer is done while the yeast is almost done with it's activity, allowing for the production of Co2 to continue to help protect the wort from oxygen.
I really don't need to transfer to secondarys. I've gone mostly to conical fermenters. That allows me to remove the trub from the vessel, thus, eleminating the requirement of a secondary. I still have the beer and layer of Co2 left in the fermenter.
Dose this help?

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So....., after bringing the wort in the keg to 8.5 qts.should I take the temp of the keg to between 51 and 59 F. before pitching the yeast on this Maibock?

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amerikes wrote:

So....., after bringing the wort in the keg to 8.5 qts.should I take the temp of the keg to between 51 and 59 F. before pitching the yeast on this Maibock?

I think the guideline is to pitch within 5 dgree of ferment temp. For my Maibock, I put 2 gallons of spring water in the fridge about 2 days before brewing and used that for initial fill and to bring up to 8.5. That brought the keg temp down to the low 60's and I pitched then. I then fermented between 54 and 57 with no issues. Had a ton of activity in the keg.

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Mine has been going for 19 days. Will take my first reading this evening and maybe bump the temp up a bit for the last couple of days.

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AUStang wrote:

Mine has been going for 19 days. Will take my first reading this evening and maybe bump the temp up a bit for the last couple of days.

This helped me get down those last pesky few points, good call.

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Edd1619 wrote:

amerikes wrote:

So....., after bringing the wort in the keg to 8.5 qts.should I take the temp of the keg to between 51 and 59 F. before pitching the yeast on this Maibock?

I think the guideline is to pitch within 5 dgree of ferment temp. For my Maibock, I put 2 gallons of spring water in the fridge about 2 days before brewing and used that for initial fill and to bring up to 8.5. That brought the keg temp down to the low 60's and I pitched then. I then fermented between 54 and 57 with no issues. Had a ton of activity in the keg.

Thanks Edd1619, this will be only my second brew, so I am cautious to how I proceed. I want everything to turn out well.

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Kealia wrote:

AUStang wrote:

Mine has been going for 19 days. Will take my first reading this evening and maybe bump the temp up a bit for the last couple of days.

This helped me get down those last pesky few points, good call.

Just checked and it is at 1.019, pulled the temp up to close to 60 with the external thermostat. will keep an eye on the temp and adjust as needed in a few hrs.

Very nice taste

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I'm brewing right now, but my temp is too high to pitch, does it hurt to let set for alittle in the freezer? I'm getting close, would like around 55 deg.

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actually, if you have a lager pan that can fit the fermenter, put some ice in it and cold water and then the fermenter and let it sit for a few miniutes and it will cool off alot. i am myself not liking the idea of putting plastic in freezer even for a few minutes, i for get it is in there and it goes to crap after a while.

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Brian1179 wrote:

actually, if you have a lager pan that can fit the fermenter, put some ice in it and cold water and then the fermenter and let it sit for a few miniutes and it will cool off alot. i am myself not liking the idea of putting plastic in freezer even for a few minutes, i for get it is in there and it goes to crap after a while.


Thanks, I wasn't prepared for the higher temps. I just got the water & it didn't have time to cool down, this is my first true lager and I've been pitching MB yeast about 70 deg. ended up around 60 deg when I pitched, I think that should be ok, going to try to ferment between 52 to 55. Sure smells good & a lot of ingredients in that big can. Also did a batch of High Country Canadian Draft w/Pale Export
today.

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Just put mine in the fridge after pitching the yeast and mixing the wort. The temp on the Mr. Beer thermometer on the side of the keg showed aprox. 66 degrees when I pitched the yeast. Time will tell if it works well.

Does this sound ok? I should be able to keep it at 55 degrees after the initial mixing.

How accurate are the temp. strips?

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What's the carbonation temp for this lager. Is it the same as the ales, or since it's a lager is it at a colder temp?

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amerikes wrote:


How accurate are the temp. strips?

Very. Somebody on another forum did a series of tests comparing the temperature strip reading with a probe thermometer carefully placed in the center of the fermenter and found almost no deviation between the two.

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Bizdoc wrote:

What's the carbonation temp for this lager. Is it the same as the ales, or since it's a lager is it at a colder temp?

between 51°-59°F.

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harpdog wrote:

Bizdoc wrote:

What's the carbonation temp for this lager. Is it the same as the ales, or since it's a lager is it at a colder temp?

between 51°-59°F.

I thought the carb temp was room temp as usual then lager at cool temp for 4 - 6 weeks?

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Checked mine this morning right at 55 deg and a lot of action. I have it in a styrofoam cooler with small ice bottless.

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Edd1619 wrote:

harpdog wrote:

Bizdoc wrote:

What's the carbonation temp for this lager. Is it the same as the ales, or since it's a lager is it at a colder temp?

between 51°-59°F.

I thought the carb temp was room temp as usual then lager at cool temp for 4 - 6 weeks?

My bad - didn't read thoroughly and thought it meant ferment temp. Carb at room temp like ales.

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Please give me some ideas of how long to condition this beer and at what temps should it be conditioned.

I am currently keeping the fermentation at 55F for 2 to 3 weeks, and plan on carbonating for 2 to 3 weeks more at 55F.

The instructions say to condition for 4 to 6 weeks. Any suggested temps for conditioning Cold or Warm for this brew???

One final thing....., This brew seems to have a shorter suggested conditioning time than some of the other brews. Does that mean that it would be completely ready to chill and drink at the end of 4 to 6 weeks, or should I condition it longer?

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Well...you're going to get a lot of opinions here, so I'll just share what I'm doing. You're going to have to make your own call.

I fermented for 3 weeks at 55-58. I raised the temp for 3 days to 66 to help finish the fermentation and for a (possible) diacetyl rest.

I then lagered it for 7 days in the fridge.

Bottled this past Friday night and it will sit for 4 weeks at room temp before I pop one in the fridge for 24-48 hours to test it out. That test will tell me if it needs more time or not.

If it's good, or close, I'll move the bottles to my "cellar" where it stays closer to 60 degrees.

Your mileage/choice may vary.

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Cheers Beer Brothers :party:
I racked on 3/12 & today I took them out of containment, cleaned the bottles, labeled, & put them on the shelf. Plan to sample the 1st on 4/9. Can't wait. Blonde_Dynamite.JPG

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Kealia wrote:

Well...you're going to get a lot of opinions here, so I'll just share what I'm doing. You're going to have to make your own call.

I fermented for 3 weeks at 55-58. I raised the temp for 3 days to 66 to help finish the fermentation and for a (possible) diacetyl rest.

I then lagered it for 7 days in the fridge.

Bottled this past Friday night and it will sit for 4 weeks at room temp before I pop one in the fridge for 24-48 hours to test it out. That test will tell me if it needs more time or not.

If it's good, or close, I'll move the bottles to my "cellar" where it stays closer to 60 degrees.

Your mileage/choice may vary.

Thanks Kealia,

Yeah, I expect, and would like others ideas, whatever they maybe. It seems as though all of us glean info from each other, and then incorporate those ideas with our own. I do appreciate input. I'm new to home brewing, and I have been reading a lot of threads. I sometimes get so many ideas that it becomes confusing..... :laugh:

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amerikes wrote:

I sometimes get so many ideas that it becomes confusing..... :laugh:

I hear ya. Lots of input/data is good, but it can get overwhelming.

I read this on another forum and believe it to be true:

Ask 10 homebrewers how to do something and you'll end up with 20 different answers.

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I fermented at 59 for 3 weeks, spoke with Brewmaster at Mr. Beer, they felt the fermentation was long done, mostly I was concerned about the cloudy beer, but they said it was fine and would clear up in the conditioning, bottled last Friday and intend to carbonate for 2 weeks at 68 to 74, then condition back to the basement for a week at 58 to 62, then to the refrigerator for a week.

you both are right, so many opinions, seems it is done so many ways that there's almost no wrong way. This morning I visited another brewing site for a couple of hours and what I read there was in fact contrary to many of the posts here, so before I confused myself anymore I left. One of the things I hear preached here is the 2-2-2 routine, on the other site it was 1-2-3. Some here like to rack to a secondary, and the other site stated that there is little reason to rack for most standard extract recipes, especially ALES. Preference I guess.

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So BizDoc....,

When did the Brewmaster think was the optimum time for fermentation?

If I calculated right, it will be about 7 weeks to drink for your batch, correct?

I just started mine this past Friday, March 18th. It would be nice to know how each of our brews turn out. I'm already looking forward to the Summer Seasonal.... :)

And yes, I agree, it appears that there is a good deal of latitude to times. And, I hear of so many saying how good their beer turned out.

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Brewmaster felt 2 weeks was sufficient for fermenting, I did make a response mistake though, I will be keeping the conditioning in the basement for 2 weeks not 1, then moving to the refrigerator, for another week, so my time on this batch is 3(fermenting) -2(carbonating) -3(conitioning. The instructions state to lager for 4 to 6 weeks.

I tasted it when bottling on Friday, it tastes like it is a higher alcohol brew.

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I pick up a case of bottles, caps, capper and auto siphon at the LHBS yesterday and bottled this up today so I hope to sample one on or about 4/19. Also batch primed for the first time so we'll see how it turns out. :unsure:

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Kealia wrote:

I then lagered it for 7 days in the fridge.


Did you transfer to a secondary or leave in the keg?

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Left it in the keg. Crystal clear at bottling time.

I didn't see a need to transfer to a secondary in this case. The risks outweighed the rewards for me.

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Bottled mine yesterday. 3 week ferment at 52 - 55 degrees. The room warmed up over the last few says, sometimes to 60.
ABV came to 5.57. LOAD of trub on the bottom, lots of purty green floaties.
I had a wee taste and it was full of flavor -
I think I'll be very "hoppy" with this one.

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I've seen a lot of temp. variations on here on this brew so far, what's the general Conscience of the perfect brewing temp? I have mine in a cooler on the floor in my basement. My them. strip doesn't go low enough so I have a fridge therm. in the cooler. I've been putting two small ice bottles in morning & night & it's been staying aroung 50 to 52deg. is that to cold? It was started Fri. afternoon the 18th, I sure have A lot of activity in the keg & it smells great. I have a keg of Canadian Draft going on the shelf by my heater and thats staying at 68 deg on the therm.

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berryman wrote:

I've seen a lot of temp. variations on here on this brew so far, what's the general Conscience of the perfect brewing temp? I have mine in a cooler on the floor in my basement. My them. strip doesn't go low enough so I have a fridge therm. in the cooler. I've been putting two small ice bottles in morning & night & it's been staying aroung 50 to 52deg. is that to cold? It was started Fri. afternoon the 18th, I sure have A lot of activity in the keg & it smells great. I have a keg of Canadian Draft going on the shelf by my heater and thats staying at 68 deg on the therm.

I'm new to this, but I have mine fermenting at about 53 to 57 using bottled ice water in my small fridge. Since the recomendation for that yeast says the optimum temp. is between 51 and 59 degrees F., then I would think that would be ok. Also, then it would stand to reason to me, that the carbonation temp. should also be in this same range for two weeks. Or, at least that is what I am thinking. Mine has had a lot of activity also since I started it not quite a week ago. I'm still considering at what temp. that I should condition mine at. That seems to be the point of greatest variation??? Not sure why? Seems to me, that for the optimum brew, there should be some optimum range for the conditioning. Kind of in a quandary about that.

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Carb should be room temp the back to cool temps for condition. I will probably leave mine at room temp for about 4 weeks before testing one out then moving to cooler location.

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I always brew the seasonals as is, as I want to taste them the way the are. They're seasonals, dammit.

But, I have to figure out how I'm going to lager. It's still too cold in my garage, and the temp fluctuates too much in there anyway. I may do the cooler and ice thing, but that sounds like a pita.

I have a camping ac/dc refridge, I have to test that, but I'm sure even at low settin, it's too cold. I just got the seasonal in UPS today, so maybe by this weekend I'll have it figured out.

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Just did mine the other night. Came in at .056 like Truckn. I also filled to the top of the word "quart". Sitting in my garage right now which is staying between 50 and 53. Hoping for the weather to cooperate with temps for a couple of weeks.

I need a clarification though, since this is my first run with a lager yeast. Do I carb at room temp (65-70) or in the garage at lager temps (50-58)? Same question with conditioning.

Thanks guys, I'm excited about this one!!

:stout:

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Carb at room temp. Conditioning seems to be a matter of opinion.

I'm going 2 weeks at room temp to carb, 2 at room temp to condition, then one goes in the fridge and the rest go into cold conditioning around 58 or so - mostly for storage reasons.

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Tabasco wrote:

I may do the cooler and ice thing, but that sounds like a pita.


Well that's how I'm trying to do it & it has been keeping fairly steady, I just don't know my actual fementing temp as I am using a them. in the cooler. Before I do a S-23 brew again I'll do the thermometer in the cover

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Thanks for the labeling tips Beerlabelman! I absolutely love personalizing my creations.

On the temperature discussion, I am fortunate enough to have an extra full size frig and I set the freezer temp to it's lowest setting and the same on the frig side. A couple of times a week I check the temp, and I have been maintaining a consistent 55deg. I plan to ferment for 3 weeks, carb 2 weeks and lager for at least 4 weeks before I even attempt to sample one. :chug:

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Just brewed up the Spring Maibock. :cheer:

The weather started getting warm last week, I didn't know when I'd be able to get this one started.
Now a cold front has passed through and temps in WV are going to be in the 40s for the next week to 10 days. Figured it was a perfect time to brew then ferment in a cooler in the garage.

OG was 1.060, it's gonna be a good one!! :gulp:

Remember....the waiting is the hardest part!!

I'm using a digital thermometer to keep track of temps. I just put the probe into the cooler with the keg, run the cord outside, close lid and bingo, temp checking is easy.

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