Jump to content
Mr.Beer Community
Sign in to follow this  
FedoraDave

Crown Top IPA

Recommended Posts

Actually, this is more of an American IPA in the flavor profile I'm going for. I want to try my hand at a pale ale, and now that I have a pretty good handle on partial mashing, I feel I can do justice to the style.

I'm posting this now because I probably won't be ready to brew it for at least two weeks, and I want input so I can refine it a little before getting the ingredients. So comments, questions, etc., would be appreciated no little, and more than somewhat.

CROWN TOP IPA

Yield = 2.14 gallons

OG = 1.063 Estimate FG = 1.016 IBU = 61 Color = 11 ABV = 6.1%

Canadian 2-row - 3 lb.
Crystal 20L - 1/2 lb.
Light DME - 1 lb.

Northern Brewer pellet - 1/4 oz. 60 minutes
Northern Brewer pellet - 1/4 oz. 50 minutes
Northern Brewer pellet - 1/4 oz. 40 minutes
Northern Brewer pellet - 1/4 oz. 30 minutes
Northern Brewer pellet - 1/4 oz. 22 minutes
Northern Brewer pellet - 1/4 oz. 7.5 minutes

California ale yeast - 1 unit

This pretty much falls in line with QBrew's American IPA characteristics.

From what I've read, Northern Brewer is used in California Steam Beers. I use it for the flavoring boil in FedoraDave's American Ale, but I've never used it for bittering or aroma. I feel it will bring some good qualities to the brew.

California ale yeast seemed like a natural choice.

I'm adding the DME because I'm reluctant to do a partial mash of more than 3 pounds, and the recipe seems too thin unless I use the DME to supplement. I might go with extra light to lower to color value a little, but that's an aesthetic choice more than anything. I also wonder if I need the Crystal 20L steep, or is that just gilding the lily?

Any other input would be greatly appreciated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks good to me...
Lots of Hop additions, going to be babysitting your timer.

I'd leave the 20L in(You could substitute it for something like Biscuit Malt?)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not one to knock anyone on their hop selection but that seems to be a bit of a strange hop for an AIPA being that its a British hop. Also I like my IPAs a little more carmely and roasty which in turn makes them more of a copper color which I like as well, so I usually steep crystal 40 or even 60.

But I love the aggressive hop schedule it should be one tasty beer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

crazybrody wrote:

I'm not one to knock anyone on their hop selection but that seems to be a bit of a strange hop for an AIPA being that its a British hop. Also I like my IPAs a little more carmely and roasty which in turn makes them more of a copper color which I like as well, so I usually steep crystal 40 or even 60.

But I love the aggressive hop schedule it should be one tasty beer.

Well, according to Northern Brewer (the supplier, not the hops strain), Northern Brewer (the hops strain, not the supplier) is a "Very versatile high-alpha dual-use hop from Germany with clean bittering and good aroma – woody and earthy. Widely used for kettle additions in European, English, and American ales and lagers. The signature aroma hop of Anchor Steam. Typical alpha 8-10%."

So I don't think I'm too off-base using it for an AIPA. I think it was the mention that it's used in Anchor Steam that kind of sold me on it, and I like it as a flavoring hops for FD's American Ale.

I'm going for a lighter-colored, drier Pale Ale, and I think the woody contribution of NB hops would work well with it.

I haven't done a hop schedule as aggressive as this, and I may wind up with a hop-bomb that I'm not all that crazy about (QBrew says the upper range for an AIPA IBU is 60), but this is kind of a first-time experimental recipe. And IPA is one of the styles I'd like to nail a recipe on and keep in the rotation.

Thanks for your comments!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dave,
Have you considered Increaing your 2 row to 5.5 to 6 lbs and ditching the DME thereby brewing an all grain. A partial mash of 3 lbs is pretty close to a full mash BIAB. IMO, the BIAB method is no more difficult and actually less work than a partial mash and DME.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmmmm. You make a good point, doc. I may actually do that. I'll run the numbers through QBrew and see what it coughs up.

Yeah, removing the DME and upping the 2-row to 5 lb keeps the numbers pretty much the same.

I think I may just do that. Thanks for the suggestion. Would you recommend a one-hour mash, then?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

docpd wrote:

Dave,
Have you considered Increaing your 2 row to 5.5 to 6 lbs and ditching the DME thereby brewing an all grain. A partial mash of 3 lbs is pretty close to a full mash BIAB. IMO, the BIAB method is no more difficult and actually less work than a partial mash and DME.

I'm not trying to dissuade Dave from going all grain by any means, but I think there are a couple of considerations here. Dave has only done one partial mash so far (I think). With a partial mash, if you make a mistake on the mashing, you're still going to get a decent beer because the DME/LME will make up the difference. With All Grain, if your efficiency is off, your beer is sex in a canoe.

Do you have the equipment to do all grain, Dave? You need a much bigger boil pot. Then, since you've done a full wort boil, you need a way to cool it.

I agree with your premise to an extent. If you've got the room and the equipment to do all grain, it doesn't take any more time or effort to do all grain than partial mash. That's sort of why I skipped steeping and went straight to partial mash--I didn't see enough difference in the process. But it takes a much bigger pot and a lot more room (and potentially a bigger stove or some outdoor setup) to do all grain.

Actually, as I think about it, there was a thread on HBT about doing all grain on a stovetop and I think that was aimed at 5 gallon batches.

Maybe I'm being overly cautious, and maybe this fits that post I made about how the next stage isn't as difficult as you think. But I think it makes sense to get a few partial mashes under one's belt before going all grain.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Either way you go Dave I think you definitely want the crystal as the 2 row is a great base, but the crystal is going to add to the mouthfeel. Sounds like a winner to me!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

bpgreen wrote:

docpd wrote:

Dave,
Have you considered Increaing your 2 row to 5.5 to 6 lbs and ditching the DME thereby brewing an all grain. A partial mash of 3 lbs is pretty close to a full mash BIAB. IMO, the BIAB method is no more difficult and actually less work than a partial mash and DME.

I'm not trying to dissuade Dave from going all grain by any means, but I think there are a couple of considerations here. Dave has only done one partial mash so far (I think). With a partial mash, if you make a mistake on the mashing, you're still going to get a decent beer because the DME/LME will make up the difference. With All Grain, if your efficiency is off, your beer is sex in a canoe.

Do you have the equipment to do all grain, Dave? You need a much bigger boil pot. Then, since you've done a full wort boil, you need a way to cool it.

I agree with your premise to an extent. If you've got the room and the equipment to do all grain, it doesn't take any more time or effort to do all grain than partial mash. That's sort of why I skipped steeping and went straight to partial mash--I didn't see enough difference in the process. But it takes a much bigger pot and a lot more room (and potentially a bigger stove or some outdoor setup) to do all grain.

Actually, as I think about it, there was a thread on HBT about doing all grain on a stovetop and I think that was aimed at 5 gallon batches.

Maybe I'm being overly cautious, and maybe this fits that post I made about how the next stage isn't as difficult as you think. But I think it makes sense to get a few partial mashes under one's belt before going all grain.

Those are important considerations. I appreciate your bringing them up.

I do, actually, have a large enough pot. Before I started my first batch, I bought a brew pot, and I somehow knew I was going to be moving beyond the four cups required for MB batches. I bought a five-gallon pot, which at first seemed silly, but which is now working out well. I've got an 8-gallon monster for when I get my 5-gallon kit up and running.

As far as chilling the wort, that's going to be a bit trickier. I do have an immersion chiller, but I don't have any way to hook it up to anything other than the outdoor faucets, which are turned off for the winter. My only other option is a huge ice bath. I have a galvanized party bucket I won as a doorprize last year, so that will probably work pretty well for that. It even has a stand to keep things at waist-level. Not the most efficient method of chilling that much volume, perhaps, but it'll work. It may be awkward, and I may have to do it outside, but I'll find a way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

linguini wrote:

Either way you go Dave I think you definitely want the crystal as the 2 row is a great base, but the crystal is going to add to the mouthfeel. Sounds like a winner to me!!

Yeah, I wanted the crystal to add body and head retention. Frankly, that's the only part of this recipe I'm 100% confident about! :laugh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I never did a partial mash before jumping to all grain using the BIAB method. I found the process to be straight forward and generally easy for a MR B sized batch. Mashing in a bag is really not much different from steeping except for the volume of water and the amount of grain used. Dave has plenty of experience doing steeping, DME hop boils, etc., so this is not a big jump. Either method should give a great beer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

docpd wrote:

I never did a partial mash before jumping to all grain using the BIAB method. I found the process to be straight forward and generally easy for a MR B sized batch. Mashing in a bag is really not much different from steeping except for the volume of water and the amount of grain used. Dave has plenty of experience doing steeping, DME hop boils, etc., so this is not a big jump. Either method should give a great beer.

Good point. I made a similar point not long ago, that steeping and mashing aren't that much more difficult than extract, so if a partial mash isn't that much more difficult than extract, all grain is kind of the same thing, just on a larger scale. I don't have the equipment for the larger volume, but I think Dave does, and he's done a lot of steeping and I think he recently did a partial mash, so he should be good to go.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

bpgreen wrote:

docpd wrote:

I never did a partial mash before jumping to all grain using the BIAB method. I found the process to be straight forward and generally easy for a MR B sized batch. Mashing in a bag is really not much different from steeping except for the volume of water and the amount of grain used. Dave has plenty of experience doing steeping, DME hop boils, etc., so this is not a big jump. Either method should give a great beer.

Good point. I made a similar point not long ago, that steeping and mashing aren't that much more difficult than extract, so if a partial mash isn't that much more difficult than extract, all grain is kind of the same thing, just on a larger scale. I don't have the equipment for the larger volume, but I think Dave does, and he's done a lot of steeping and I think he recently did a partial mash, so he should be good to go.

This is all correct. It just hadn't occurred to me to go all-grain, and for some reason I didn't monkey around with the numbers in QBrew to see what I would get. Until docpd pointed me in the right direction.

Now I can see his point that a DME addition would actually be more work. And since I've been schooled by crazybrody's excellent thread on his BIAB method, I'm confident about this.

I may change the hop bill, I'm not sure. I want to do a little more research, but I won't be ready to brew this for at least another week, anyway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...