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Ikaika

OATMEAL!

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I bought some Steel cut Oats to use in my Stout, I had an idea that I would lightly toast them. I'll be using 2 cups. I'm thinking it would bring out a toasty, nutty flavor. Any thoughts? Is it a good idea?

P.S. I'm not sure on the cooking of the oats but I guess I'll just do what the package says. 25-30 minutes. Or should it be a lot less like 5 minutes?

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If you want to toast the oats do it at like 350 and watch them close as soon as they start to brown take them out.
Then just just a normal steep in a bag at around 160 for 30 minutes.

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crazybrody wrote:

If you want to toast the oats do it at like 350 and watch them close as soon as they start to brown take them out.
Then just just a normal steep in a bag at around 160 for 30 minutes.

Thanks man! Just the answer I was looking for. These oats aren't precooked so I wasn't sure about the steep time. Their not rolled oats either.

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Whats the difference between steeping and mashing? I roasted and steeped oatmeal for my Irish Oatmeal Stout I did a few weeks ago. Turned out pretty good

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Clearcut23 wrote:

Whats the difference between steeping and mashing? I roasted and steeped oatmeal for my Irish Oatmeal Stout I did a few weeks ago. Turned out pretty good

How long did you steep them?

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Clearcut23 wrote:

Whats the difference between steeping and mashing? I roasted and steeped oatmeal for my Irish Oatmeal Stout I did a few weeks ago. Turned out pretty good

Steeping is used to extract sugars that have already been converted (often by roasting). Mashing uses base malts for enzymes in them that convert unfermentable starches into fermentable and unfermentable sugars. Some base malts have just enough enzymes to convert themselves, while others (such as 2 row) can convert their own starches as well as the starches in other grains. If you cracked a bunch of wheat and soaked it in water at 150, you would get little, if any sugar. If you cracked some two row and added it in, the enzymes would get to work on the starches in the wheat and the malt and convert them into various sugars.

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bpgreen wrote:

Clearcut23 wrote:

Whats the difference between steeping and mashing? I roasted and steeped oatmeal for my Irish Oatmeal Stout I did a few weeks ago. Turned out pretty good

Steeping is used to extract sugars that have already been converted (often by roasting). Mashing uses base malts for enzymes in them that convert unfermentable starches into fermentable and unfermentable sugars. Some base malts have just enough enzymes to convert themselves, while others (such as 2 row) can convert their own starches as well as the starches in other grains. If you cracked a bunch of wheat and soaked it in water at 150, you would get little, if any sugar. If you cracked some two row and added it in, the enzymes would get to work on the starches in the wheat and the malt and convert them into various sugars.

Looks like I still have alot to learn. I think i'll stick to LHBS recommended recipes till I get the hang of it

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If you toast them to long, the over with dry / burn them, and that will transfer to the brew. A slow toasting with mixing and no more than 5 to 8 minutes at 350 degrees with a toaster over

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I toasted mine as Brody described for my stout. Then steeped them with other steeping grains for 30 minutes.

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Clearcut23 wrote:

bpgreen wrote:

Clearcut23 wrote:

Whats the difference between steeping and mashing? I roasted and steeped oatmeal for my Irish Oatmeal Stout I did a few weeks ago. Turned out pretty good

Steeping is used to extract sugars that have already been converted (often by roasting). Mashing uses base malts for enzymes in them that convert unfermentable starches into fermentable and unfermentable sugars. Some base malts have just enough enzymes to convert themselves, while others (such as 2 row) can convert their own starches as well as the starches in other grains. If you cracked a bunch of wheat and soaked it in water at 150, you would get little, if any sugar. If you cracked some two row and added it in, the enzymes would get to work on the starches in the wheat and the malt and convert them into various sugars.

Looks like I still have alot to learn. I think i'll stick to LHBS recommended recipes till I get the hang of it

Don't let all of that scare you off. I gave the science behind it, but that's not all that important (well, it is, but you can do a lot even if you skip the science). The main difference is that you typically use about 1.25 qt of water per lb of grains and you need to make sure that you include grains that are considered base malts. The most common are 2 row and 6 row, but I bought a big bag of mild ale from the LHBS that had a clearance before going all-online and it's a base malt. You also mash for longer than you steep, typically 45-60 minutes for a mash. Temperature control and water volume are a little more important for mashing than for steeping, but I'm convinved that if you can steep, you can mash.

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