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packerduf

Head and Lacing - Interesting

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I found these YouTube videos to be quite interesting. John Palmer offers some insight regarding head and lacing, specific to extract brewing.

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Interesting. I thought the discussion about late extract additions in small volume boils to be particularly enlightening.

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oly wrote:

Interesting. I thought the discussion about late extract additions in small volume boils to be particularly enlightening.

This "high gravity boil" issue has me a little confused. Prior to seeing the YouTube videos, I thought a high gravity boil was a boil that included 100% of the malt - regardless of water volume. But now, if I understand what was said in the videos, a high gravity boil is a boil with a higher gravity than the final result (i.e., recipe OG = 1.050, boil gravity = 1.080). So for a MB-sized batch, if my boil volume is 2.4 gal (or so), and I do a hop boil using 100% of the malt, then that is not considered a high gravity boil.

Am I correct on this? If so, it clears up many questions I had regarding this subject.

BTW: I found the use of "hop extract" to be quite interesting also. I never even knew it existed.

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I think your interpretation is correct. Since the extract has already been through a hot break in the manufacturing process, subjecting the whole thing to another hot break will precipitate out proteins that help maintain a good head. Hence his suggestion that you would use enough extract in the boil to replicate the gravity of the total volume going into the fermenter, then adding the remainder of the extract at flame out. This also helps with hop utilization.

That would explain the lack of head and lacing on the Cooper's IPA that I have in front of me. Although I did a full volume boil, it still resulted in the entire amount of extract going through a second hot break when I boiled it, so no proteins to support the foam structure.

Ive checked into buying isomerized hop extract, but can only find it in large volumes. Aromatic and flavoring extracts can be found more easily in homebrew sized quantities.

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Theres a thread on HBT about that takesomeadvice guy... you should check out his real videos that he didnt overlay john palmers voice on... ridiculous is all i have to say.

Edit: John Plamers info is spot on though!

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oly wrote:

Ive checked into buying isomerized hop extract, but can only find it in large volumes. Aromatic and flavoring extracts can be found more easily in homebrew sized quantities.


I did a little poking around, and I agree with your findings. MoreBeer has 1 oz bottles ($27), but it appears to be more of an additive to bump IBUs. Regardless of volume, it doesn't appear to be very cost effective IMO. That may explain why hop extracts (for bittering) have not been given more attention, here on the Borg.
TJTHEBEST wrote:

Theres a thread on HBT about that takesomeadvice guy... you should check out his real videos that he didnt overlay john palmers voice on... ridiculous is all i have to say.

Edit: John Plamers info is spot on though!


I watched a few, and I agree with your assessment - he's a squirrel. But as you said, Palmer's input is spot-on and well worth a listen.

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Interesting listening... I always thought that pasteurizing LME was an inferior way to do things... I might try boiling my wort as suggested next time... and pasteurizing the remainder... I'm curious how it will turn out... maybe I should do a side-by-side batch.

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I can't see the videos here at work, I'll check 'em out when I get time at home. But yah, it makes sense that saving some of the lme for late addition (like we did on Tabacker Imperial IPA), would help with the 'ol head dept.

Geez, I love saying Tabacker Imperial IPA.

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The audio actually says not to do a late addition, but not to take it past hot break... totally backwards from what I've been doing for the last year.

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Tabasco wrote:

...Geez, I love saying Tabacker Imperial IPA.

Me too Tom, but love drinking it even more. My son (Noah) and I finished off the last of the first batch last night. To my delight, it just so happens that batch #2 is ready to pop in the fridge. I guess I'd better get started on batch #3 soon. Noah also brewed a batch of the Tabacker on Sunday night, so we're in good shape for a while. I think an all-grain version is in my future. ;)

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Tabasco wrote:

I can't see the videos here at work, I'll check 'em out when I get time at home. But yah, it makes sense that saving some of the lme for late addition (like we did on Tabacker Imperial IPA), would help with the 'ol head dept.

Geez, I love saying Tabacker Imperial IPA.

You can take the "Tabacker Imperial IPA" I liked the sound of an " 'ol head dept."......lololol.....

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oly wrote:

I think your interpretation is correct. Since the extract has already been through a hot break in the manufacturing process, subjecting the whole thing to another hot break will precipitate out proteins that help maintain a good head. Hence his suggestion that you would use enough extract in the boil to replicate the gravity of the total volume going into the fermenter, then adding the remainder of the extract at flame out. This also helps with hop utilization.

Okay Oly, I'm a little slow sometimes. It took me a while to fully understand the double benefit here.

By reducing the amount of LME used in the boil, it allows you to reduce your water volume, yet still avoid a high-gravity boil - resulting in better hop isomerization/utilization. Further, the late addition of the remaining malt avoids another hot-break, thereby maintaining the medium proteins responsible for increased/improved head retention/lacing (like Tabasco said).

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