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marblejones

Cold Crashing

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American Blonde Ale has been fermenting for two weeks. Sampled tonight and it is still cloudy. One video says if your beer is cloudy keep it in the fermenter others say to put keg in the refridgerator for three days then bottle.

This is the first beer that I have made and since its a basic beer it looks weak and taste weak so if someone else has brewed American Blonde Ale or the Cowboy Lager could you let me know if this is what you experienced with this beer tasting weak looking like a unshaken orange juice and being cloudy after two weeks.

Thanks for your help!

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If this was your first sample, you could just be getting some of the trub. Personally, I would wait about a week no matter what to finish fermenting. If it's still cloudy, cold crash for a few days. That should clear it up some.

I've done brews that looked cloudy when I sampled after 2 weeks and when I bottled they were much clearer and I didn't need to cold crash. I also had brews that were cloudy that cleared up during conditioning.

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I don't understand the "why" of it, but often a day or two after I take the first hydro sample to test FG my brews clarify alot.

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mashani wrote:

I don't understand the "why" of it, but often a day or two after I take the first hydro sample to test FG my brews clarify alot.

Thats because when the yeast are eating up all of the sugars, you they are mixing stuff up making the beer cloudy. Once they slow down the particles settle to the bottom. On really active fermentations, there will be so much action going on, it looks like something is stirring up the inside of the fermenter. It is kinda hard to see what is going on through the Mr. Beer keg. Glass or clear plastic shows better.

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marblejones wrote:

American Blonde Ale has been fermenting for two weeks. Sampled tonight and it is still cloudy. One video says if your beer is cloudy keep it in the fermenter others say to put keg in the refridgerator for three days then bottle.

This is the first beer that I have made and since its a basic beer it looks weak and taste weak so if someone else has brewed American Blonde Ale or the Cowboy Lager could you let me know if this is what you experienced with this beer tasting weak looking like a unshaken orange juice and being cloudy after two weeks.

Thanks for your help!

Invest in hydrometer to be sure. If it is a stock American Blonde Ale, you should be good, but cold crashing will make the finished product even clearer. The only real way to tell if it is done is take a gravity reading, and look for the same reading for about 3 days in a row. I would guess you are probably good to bottle though.

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My only concern with cold crashing is if you do it too long you can accidentally pull too much yeast out of suspension. This can cause problems when bottle conditioning

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StarRaptor wrote:

My only concern with cold crashing is if you do it too long you can accidentally pull too much yeast out of suspension. This can cause problems when bottle conditioning

I've only heard one other person say that, and they were a first time brewer. Has cold crashing ever been an issue for you, come conditioning time, or is it just something you heard? I just tried it for the first time with this batch, it only cold crashed for about 2 days so not long. But I cold crashed this batch the other day, but I did it after a week, and transfered it to a secondary. I am guessing the motion of transferring from keg to keg will stir up the yeast a bit. Sort of wonder if bottling with a spigot (at the bottom of a keg) the yeast that fell, would be pulled by the flow, the beer with less yeast on top would be pushing down, so it might re suspend it as you are filling bottles.

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