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gophers6

adding honey

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I am new to Mr. Beer, having brewed only the WPCA that came with it. I'm surprised at how good it is. My next batch will be the wiezen with booster. I like honey wheat beer so I'd like to add honey to this next batch. Any hints on 1.how much, 2.when to add, 3. still use all the booster? Thanks.

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1. I would start off with a cup.
2. Add it when you mix in the extracts to make the wort.
3. You can still use all of the booster. However you do have to remember that you will need to let the beer ferment for an extra week because you are adding the honey. A good rule of thumb is one week per fermentable. So if the recipe is one can of extract, a pack of booster, and a cup of honey would need about three weeks.

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norman1 wrote:

I am new to Mr. Beer, having brewed only the WPCA that came with it. I'm surprised at how good it is. My next batch will be the wiezen with booster. I like honey wheat beer so I'd like to add honey to this next batch. Any hints on 1.how much, 2.when to add, 3. still use all the booster? Thanks.

Remember that honey does not impart it's flavor to the beer. Rather it gives the beer a dry finish. I would suggest that you start at 1/2 cup and try that much.

Also consider replacing the booster with a can of UME or a pound of DME instead. It will give your beer much more body.

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And, if you are going to stray off the path a wee bit, and we all do, heck some of us just run nekkid throught the woods, I'd say you need to get a hydrometer for those experiments. They don't cost much, and just use the tube it came in for your sample, that way you don't use up much.
:side:

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If your honey is pasturized you can add it with the HME. However, if your honey is unpasteurized, be sure to boil it for a bit.

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yankeedag wrote:

And, if you are going to stray off the path a wee bit, and we all do, heck some of us just run nekkid throught the woods, I'd say you need to get a hydrometer for those experiments. They don't cost much, and just use the tube it came in for your sample, that way you don't use up much.
:side:

Now that's a really good hint. I've been wanting to get a hydrometer, but had seen a big ole tube for the sample and was worried about taking such a large sample. Can you just put a stopper in the tube and keep and use the same sample?

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I be t'inkin that maybe samplin' the actual brew in th' keg would be a much better idea laddy. To re-sample a sample is like re-drinking a beer. if you get me drift.:dry: Besides, you'd keep poppin yer stopper, if the yeast is still workin in yer sample, and we all know that hurts.
;)

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I second the comment about tossing the booster and using your money on a UME. In all my beers the booster tends to give off an unpleasant hard alcohol aftertaste. But if you like that kinda thing, go at it, I did it and the beer was still drinkable!

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TexCajun wrote:

If your honey is pasturized you can add it with the HME. However, if your honey is unpasteurized, be sure to boil it for a bit.

I've seen this before but am curious why. Honey is a natural antiseptic and is used as such by a lot of cultures.

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mcgrewc wrote:

TexCajun wrote:

If your honey is pasturized you can add it with the HME. However, if your honey is unpasteurized, be sure to boil it for a bit.

I've seen this before but am curious why. Honey is a natural antiseptic and is used as such by a lot of cultures.

Unpasteurized honey may contain bacterias and wild yeasts that can ruin your beer.

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Remember that yeast loves Beer, all yeast loves beer. Keeping wild yeasts out of your wort is what is all about!

Plus you do not really know what anti-bacterial qualities your local honey really has!:huh:

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