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tempratue range

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I just startd my first batch,Cowboy Lager. It's been 14 days now fermenting and the sample I took is still cloudy and yeast tasting with a very small amount of bubbles. The best temprature range I can get is 77 to 81 degrees, thats room temprature. Is this too hot for fermentation? Should I wait another week?

Thanks for any advice.
Cheers!

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Thats pretty hot. Try putting the fermenter into a shallow cookie sheet with a bit of water in it and draping a wet t shirt over the keg that is in the water. I makes kind of a self cooling thing for the keg.

Or go get a cheap cooler and put it inside the cooler with frozen water bottles.

I think its too late for this batch but you will have beer so dont worry too much. I bet at those temps at 14 days your ready to bottle.

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We caught a heat wave right after I started. Lasted about a week. I would put the keg outside at night to cool off. It got down to 74 by morning and up to 81 at the most by days end. The second week was 72 to 78. Are you thinking it's pretty much gone?

Thnx

sorry for the typos, fat fingers and old eyes

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It's not gone its just a learning experience. Dont expect to be amazed by the results, but it will be beer. Yeast like constant temperatures as well. If you can swing it go get a cooler. I think mine is a 48 qt and it fits about perfect, save room for about 3-6 frozen water bottles and then switch them out about every 12 hours. This will keep the temp down and cosistant. You can kind of see my keg in a cooler in this pic.

mboops-20110717.jpg

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I'm goin to give it a shot. Couldn't hurt I guess. I have some October fest I want to try next. Any advice?

Thanks crazybrody!

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:chug: Welcome to the borg! as far as advice that cowboy lager after 4 weeks in the bottle will be ok but not great! I know i have done this when i started last year as for your nexy batch in the hot summer months i use a ice chest and rotete bottle of frozen water out daily it helps keep thing at a good temp for brewing! :stout:

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Two weeks at that temp, the beer is likely done fermenting. Bottle it and try to keep the bottles between about 68 - 75 for at least 4 weeks before you put one in the fridge to test.

As has been said, don't judge what you can make by that batch. At the temps you mentioned you will likely have some off-flavors (but it will still be beer). On your next batch try the cooler or the water pan + t-shirt to hold temps closer to 65-72 and you will get a "cleaner" performance from the yeast.

Live and learn. We all went through it.

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Guest System Admin

I am running the same problem. Basement is holding at 79 degrees and a bit higher when we have a "hot" day.

And I am not home enough to keep up with frozen bottles in a cooler. Out of town too much.

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packerduf wrote:

I haven't used it, but perhaps this yeast would benefit temperature challenged brewers:

Still Spirits Turbo Yeast Heat Wave (138 g)

Just curious if anyone has used spirits yeast with beer. It said something about turbo carbon is suggested and on it is says not for use with beer or wine. Is there a difference? If not why do they package them saying spirits yeast, wine yeast or champagne yeast?

ED: Started to look around at different sites and they say that spirit yeast wouldn't work well with beer. Something about it breaks down simple sugars leaving little to no taste as where beer yeast break down a variety of different sugars and impart significant taste signatures :dry: I don't know just what I read...anyone here ever tried it?

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I usually either work from home or travel and work at the client site. I was traveling a lot when I started brewing, so I used the wet t-shirt method (except I used a towel). It works well enough that I do that when I'm working from home, also. Makes it easier to manage. I use a disposable aluminum roaster from the dollar store or from Sam's (they're actually less money and more durable at Sams, but you have to buy a bunch of them). Under ideal conditions (low humidity) the temperature can be 10 degrees cooler (or more) than the room temperature. If your humidity is high, you won't see that much of a drop, but you can improve your results by aiming a fan at the fermenter.

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+1 to all

I use the cooler method with water bottles, but even on the days that I work, I usually have the opportunity to swap out the bottles in the afternoon and evening/late night. That is, when I remember :P

About the yeasts, I have an apartment with crappy insulation, so I have trouble keeping the LBK's cooler than 60*, so I have put my lagers on hold. We had a good bit of heat the past couple weeks, so I decided to try a Saison, which I wanted to experiment with anyway, and used Wyeast 3724 Belgian Saison. It has an optimum temp of 70-85 and works well into the 90*s just fine. Of course, with Belgian yeasts, usually the warmer it is, the more esters you get which is fine by me. I don't even have it in the cooler at this point and it sits right around 85* most days.

I also wanted to brew a modified batch of Nong Cider for the holidays, so I have that working now as it takes a good 4-6 months to condition properly. The nice thing about cider is that it works very well at warm temps and I used the Red Star wine yeast from MB which does well in a wide variety of temps, up to 90 or higher.

There are also a few other strains of yeast that work better for beer than those spirit strains, which mostly just go for broke on high ABV. Experiment with them. The Ale yeast that comes with the HME's (Fromunda yeast as we call it around here), works fairly well at a wide range of temps as well. It should be said though, that if you use Fromunda, you should pitch about 2-4 packets. This helps to keep the yeast from stressing too bad, especially in high alcoholic or high temp conditions.

Edit: Welcome to the obsession. :cheers:

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