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Slick2887

New Brewer, highly addicted!

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Hello all!

I received a Mr Beer kit as a gift a while back and finally got around to opening it up and starting my first batch of West Coast Pale Ale. I followed the instructions that came with the kit, but was a little disheartened after reading up on the subject online (the kit instructions leave out ALOT of important details lol).

My batch has been fermenting for 7 days and I took a little sample to taste. It tasted like flat beer and almost has me thinking I should bottle it (aside from the fact that everyone on this forum says to hold off for at least 14 days hehe. Just for the sake of experimentation, I'm thinking of filling one bottle now, another in 7 days, then the rest after another 14 days and see how much they vary with the different times.

The West Coast Pale Ale seems like a relatively basic recipe and may not require extended amount of time to ferment, but I was wondering what everyone else's experiences have been?

PS- I already bought another keg and have American Devil IPA and Witty Monk Witbier ready to start brewing! Despite wanting to jump right in, I'm holding off to see how my first batch turns out and how I can improve my technique :silly:

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Welcome...

In lieu of a hydrometer (which I would recommend as you get more into this so that you know when the beer is done instead of having to depend on time guesstimates... They are available on the Mr. B site or at your LHBS, and it's $6 well spent), I'd recommend waiting for the 14 days. If it is indeed tasting like flat beer, you may be OK to proceed, but you'll really not know if it is complete without the hydrometer. The 14 days gives a good buffer.

Regarding a staggered bottling... as you remove volume in the fermenter, you're introducing a potential risk of infection either from the spigot or from the addition of airspace in the top of the fermenter. You may be fine, but I wouldn't recommend it (and I think I've seen the just-departed Mr. B Brewmaster state the same earlier).

What I'd recommend now is...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pEzuC5UoM8g

(I know it's hard... ;))

My best recommendations for this and future brews is patience and temperature control. Try to pitch your yeast at a cool enough temp (I try for 70) and try to ferment at a cool enough temp (I try for mid-60's).

Good luck and have fun...

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Of all the ingredients you can add to beer the absolutely most important one is one that you can not buy.

And that is patience.

Everyone, when they're starting out, just can't wait to get that first beer in a glass. Trust me, everyone on this forum has been there. And the omly way you're going to learn this is through experience.

So go ahead and bottle one or two now, a couple more a week from now and the rest after three weeks. Then give them, respectively, one, two and three weeks conditioning in the bottles. You'll see how time can make a good beer into a great beer.

Oh and, welcome to the obsession. ;)

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Patience seems to be the most important technique to master haha. I know I'm just starting out, but everyone is correct when they say "home brewing is NOT a hobby, its an OBSESSION :cheer: .Thanks for the advice!

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I just started brewing after receiving my first Mr Beer kit this past January.

Yep, patience is the hardest part of this venture.

Especially letting beer condition in the bottles for several weeks while you are thirsty.

The solution is to buy more LBK's and brew MORE BEER! :P

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BTW, here's a similar question from 6 months ago and the reply from the former Mr. Beer brewmaster on the subject...

Rattlehead wrote:

Hi All,

So I am in the process of brewing my first batch! I am at Day 7 of primary fermentation. I am planning on going the full 14 days but I was wondering if it would be ok for me to bottle one bottle's worth of beer (32 oz) today? My reasoning is I am a bit of nerd and I want to compare the taste and clarity of one week of fermentation versus two as part of the learning process. My concern is that when I remove a portion of the beer from the keg that it will introduce air (oxygen) through the vents. Will the introduction of this air into the keg mess up the rest of the beer and cause off flavors? Any thoughts you all can provide is most appreciated.

...

To clarify, fermentation appears to be done, all indicators point that way: krausen gone, trub on the bottom, tastes like flat beer, no carbonation present.

My interest is really about trying to truly appreciate and understand the difference an extra week makes in the keg as far as reducing off-flavors and clearing up the beer. Its really more about learning than patience. Like I said I'm kind of a science nerd, so I'm particular about really understanding the subtle differences as oppossed to just following standardized directions.

The major question I have is whether or not intruducing a decent amount of air into the headspace of the keg will have any noticeable effect on the beer. Since they tell you not to open the lid, I guess there maybe the chance, you could introduce some bacteria or something nasty into the beer.

ericg wrote:

Seems to be a lot of disagreement on this one...

I'll just say that if it were my beer, I wouldn't do it. While Kealia & Stinkyjunk are right that sampling throughout the process isn't likely to hurt anything, that's a lot different than drawing out 32 oz of beer, which would require 32 oz of air to replace that volume.

I suspect that that amount of air in the keg would at the very least reduce the shelf life of the beer that stayed in the keg. At worst, some dust in that volume of air might bring some bacteria or wild yeast into the keg and start some off flavors. Either way, the beer left in the keg won't age in the same way that the beer in your bottle will, so it won't be a very good experiment anyways.

If you really want to see this difference for yourself, I'd suggest brewing 2 batches of a recipe (obviously, you need 2 kegs to do this). Bottle 1 after a week, then the second after 2 weeks.

:chug:

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Slick2887 wrote:

Patience seems to be the most important technique to master haha. I know I'm just starting out, but everyone is correct when they say "home brewing is NOT a hobby, its an OBSESSION :cheer: .Thanks for the advice!

:borg: Welcome to the BeerBorg Information Center. You will be Assimilated. Resistance Is quite Futile: We have Beer.

While your waiting for your beer to become of age, might want to read Adjunct Ratios and the Simple Guide Line.

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Yep. What they all said. It is tough, but patience is your best friend right now.

Welcome to the obsession!

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Welcome to the forum Slick!!!!

Please allow me to opine with the others and recommend you not do that. Just be patient. You will be glad you did.

:cheers:

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Welcome Slick...

What they all said...

Leave it sit and you will be rewarded.

:cheer:

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Thanks everyone! I'm definitely going to wait on priming/bottling.

In the meantime, I'll "rack" up my credit cards by ordering more supplies (including hydrometer) :laugh:

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Slick2887 wrote:

Thanks everyone! I'm definitely going to wait on priming/bottling.

In the meantime, I'll "rack" up my credit cards by ordering more supplies (including hydrometer) :laugh:

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Congratulations!

You made beer! The standard kits make good beer, imagine how much you'll like the deluxe or premium. Yes, you're addicted, don't try to fight it, heh heh.

I generally ferment all my batches 14 days. Sometimes a little less, rarely more.

You will have some real fun adventures trying different beers. I've made 115 batches so far, and only a few of them have been exactly the same, although I'm starting to make some pretty standard pale ales.

The MrB fermenter is now the center of your life! :laugh:

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welcome to the borg Slick2887 :cheers:

remember this

2+ weeks fermenting (depending on the recipe) sometimes more
2+ weeks carbinating at room temp(depending on the recipe)
2+ weeks conditioning in bottles at room temp (depending on recipe)

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Guest System Admin

Welcome Aboard!

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As everyone has said. Time is the secret ingredient. And patience has it's rewards. The West Coast Pale is a fairly basic beer but it's a good beer when done right and most important of all, my WIFE likes it. I keep her well supplied and she lets me brew whatever and how much I want. It don't get any better than that. Good look with your brewing.

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Welcome. It is quite the obsession. I've been at it for about a little over month now and have made 4 batches of 4 different beers. Just read and gain as much knowledge as you can. I come home from work, sit here, drink my Yuengling out of the kegorator and read. The waiting is definitely KILLING me, but, it will be worth it in the end. ;)

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:borg: Welcome to the BeerBorg Information center. you will be assimilated. resistance is quite futile: we have beer.

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I took a hydrometer reading at day 13 and 14 and it was the same so I went ahead and bottled it!

I started another batch of American Devil IPA this past weekend and it was such a different experience having already gone through some of the 'growing pains' of learning to brew. I cooled down the wort to as close to 70 degrees as I could before adding it to the LBK. Took a hydrometer reading before pitching the yeast (OG was 1.041) and now I'm waiting at least 3 weeks before even thinking about taking a hydrometer reading :-). Thanks again to everyone for all of the great advice!

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Slick2887 wrote:

I took a hydrometer reading at day 13 and 14 and it was the same so I went ahead and bottled it!

I started another batch of American Devil IPA this past weekend and it was such a different experience having already gone through some of the 'growing pains' of learning to brew. I cooled down the wort to as close to 70 degrees as I could before adding it to the LBK. Took a hydrometer reading before pitching the yeast (OG was 1.041) and now I'm waiting at least 3 weeks before even thinking about taking a hydrometer reading :-). Thanks again to everyone for all of the great advice!

You catch on fast Slick! :chug:

:cheers:

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A few batches and you will be turning out high quality brew.... I really prefer using different yeast to get brew that is cleaner tasting or 3-4 of mr b yeast..
jmho
Welcome

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